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Lactic Folly

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  1. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Publication in not-so-relevant field vs. relevant research experience and no pub   
    Yes, it depends on whether the aim is develop one's research profile, versus demonstrate interest in a field and network for residency matching. From the OP's previous posts, it seems they are primarily trying to improve their competitiveness for CaRMS.
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Publication in not-so-relevant field vs. relevant research experience and no pub   
    Preferred field. If your project may not be publishable as a student, can you do a presentation/poster at least, or write up a case report or review article on the side?
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from ChemPetE in CaRMS 2020 Interviews -- DISCUSSIONS   
    Yes, if it's a competitive specialty and those students are landing interviews everywhere (unlike most other applicants), then they are at the top of the pile and very competitive at least on paper.
    With regards to interviews, 1) it's difficult for candidates to reliably judge their own performance (and much of the committee's impression will be coloured by their prior knowledge of the candidate and their file anyway), and 2) these top applicants presumably have glowing reference letters, implying good social awareness and skills. They are unlikely to want to come across as arrogant by telling people that they thought they interviewed well *before* match results come out. They may also be genuinely humble and self-effacing people who work hard and are well-liked by others as a result.
  4. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Research - type of supervisor?   
    Reference letters tend to be more helpful when they come from people who are known to the selection committee. Therefore, all other things being equal, an academic physician is often the better choice. 
  5. Confused
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from heeach in CaRMS 2020 Interviews -- DISCUSSIONS   
    I think for most cases I didn't actually receive an official rejection from places where I wasn't offered an interview.... just silence. I suppose this leaves less of a door open for replies/rebuttals/requests.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Kaboom in Deleted   
    Agree ankle length pants are fine, assuming there is no awkward flesh-sock gap showing or anything like that.
    Re: blazer, unsure what you mean by feeling uncomfortable (physically restricting or does not feel like 'you'). Although a collared shirt and pants is also a professional look, and interviewers should not have any issues with it, do know that essentially everyone else will be wearing a blazer and consider whether you would be comfortable being the exception. If a traditional lined blazer is too stiff, there are many unlined knit and synthetic options nowadays that are more economical and will also fit the bill, but it's up to you.
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Tullius in What kind of jobs are good for Medical Students?   
    Agree in general. OP didn't mention any professional license though - if they did have one, presumably they wouldn't be asking the question the way it's presented.
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from IMislove in Not feeling smart in medicine...   
    For those who were only students before, there is an identity shift to working professional that happens gradually once in medicine, starting in around clerkship through residency. Prior to admittance, GPA was king. But grades were only a means to an end, not the end itself. Once in medicine, you will be judged on your overall competency, which comprises knowledge and skill as well as other personal characteristics such as work ethic and conscientiousness. 
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Not feeling smart in medicine...   
    For those who were only students before, there is an identity shift to working professional that happens gradually once in medicine, starting in around clerkship through residency. Prior to admittance, GPA was king. But grades were only a means to an end, not the end itself. Once in medicine, you will be judged on your overall competency, which comprises knowledge and skill as well as other personal characteristics such as work ethic and conscientiousness. 
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to JohnGrisham in CaRMS 2020 Interviews -- DISCUSSIONS   
    You should rank everywhere you would see yourself going over being unmatched.
    If you already applied and interviewed for programs, there is no reason to not rank them unless you absolutely hated the place after going through the process and would rather be unmatched.
    So the concept of s safe number is irrelevant and not a useful metric. 
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Research during M1-M2 questions   
    Research for CaRMS is more about working with faculty who are in your specialty of interest, becoming known to the department and making connections. You should be trying to work with the academic MDs in that department. 
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from mew in Are preclerks allowed to attend grand rounds?   
    Grand rounds (by their nature) should be open events. I'm sure the organizers would like to see a good turnout if there is a visiting speaker, hence the rounds were advertised and you were aware of them. M&M rounds are the main type of rounds that might be closed. Just bring your medical student ID tag.
  13. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to LostLamb in The process is taking it's toll...   
    I have never gotten around to writing my “story” but if you read my very old posts you will probably piece it together. 
     
    I am in my last six months of residency (as a subspecialist) of my life and am thrilled that I stuck things out for 5 (non consecutive) application cycles. I am going to do with my life what I literally have always wanted to do—provide medical and psychiatric care for people with developmental disabilities and mental health across the lifespan—I just didn’t know it was a thing when I was very young. I just knew by having and living with a sibling with significant special needs that it was something missing for that vulnerable part of society...and their families.
    Truly, to tolerate the uncertainty of a future career in medicine you need to continue with your life, alternate plans, and put the noise of naysayers out of your mind. 
    many people, family included, spoke directly or behind my back about “why doesn’t she give up?”. Since working toward this goal was not costing them or affecting them in any way, I couldn’t figure out what business they had to speak this way....and ignoring that chatter was very healthy for me but also gave me pause to regularly reflect on whether or not this was what I truly wanted. I am fortunate that both my parents understood and fully supported my goal. You need someone in your wheelhouse—and maybe it’s just us on the forum, but that’s something and may be all you need. 

    Many meander through life unsure of what they want, what the point is, and very unhappy. Having dreams and goals help immensely, but they must also be tempered with a dose of reality. Sometimes you just can’t afford another MCAT or degree, Or your family or medical situation dictates that you need to work or take time off, and this you’ll press pause on this goal.
     
    The key is that you do not define yourself and your success by a singular outcome, and that you continue to seek growth and build mastery and obtain fulfillment whatever the situation you’re in. And at some point you’ll get into medicine, or you won’t and you’ll find another way of living meaningfully and contently. 

    All the best to all of you, I get how you feel and I have much confidence you’ll all “make it” somehow—whatever that ends up meaning!
    LL (the shrink who almost became a high school teacher)
     
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to skyuppercutt in Undergraduate transcripts - relevance?   
    Pretty much what lactic Folly said. Also, I've always wondered why questions like that really mattered. 
    Would you not apply to a program because they requested your transcript? Probably not.
    If you did apply and didn't get an interview, would it matter that the reason was from a weak undergrad transcript vs any one of the million other reasons why people don't get a transcript? Probably not. 
    I wouldn't waste my time discussing this in a personal statement. Also, programs don't need to talk to each other about this. If they wanted to see it too, they would just ask for it instead of asking another program. 
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clopidogrel in How competitive is physiatrist? Is it a competitive specialty?   
    OP was asking about physiatry, not psychiatry... Best is to go to the source directly (CaRMS stats), and arrange some shadowing if you can.
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from gangliocytoma in How competitive is physiatrist? Is it a competitive specialty?   
    OP was asking about physiatry, not psychiatry... Best is to go to the source directly (CaRMS stats), and arrange some shadowing if you can.
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in General Question About Residency Match   
    No, what we are saying that you do not want to be remembered as someone who didn't match. There is stigma attached to the fact that the program evidently liked other candidates better than you (therefore you did not match there the first time around). That is why ploughboy's encounter was awkward. It would be better for you if the program did not know you were a prior year grad at all, and were meeting you for the first time along with the current year grads (but this is not possible).
  18. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clopidogrel in General Question About Residency Match   
    No, what we are saying that you do not want to be remembered as someone who didn't match. There is stigma attached to the fact that the program evidently liked other candidates better than you (therefore you did not match there the first time around). That is why ploughboy's encounter was awkward. It would be better for you if the program did not know you were a prior year grad at all, and were meeting you for the first time along with the current year grads (but this is not possible).
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to frenchpress in .   
    I meant that the general task of giving references is widely considered to be part of the job when you are a employed as a professor, at least at my university. Just like that of an employer for an employee. 
    Of course there’s no obligation to provide a personalized and detailed reference to every student who asks. But among my own department colleagues I found over the years (most frequently when we were all complaining around grad school and med school application season) that a majority do feel it is a professional obligation to provide at least a basic reference when asked. I always tell students I WILL give a reference, but I am very up front with them when I am unable to provide a STRONG reference. Most then decline. But I have had the occasional student who needed a reference for something to check some box, and even when I told them it wouldn't have anything other than a description of the course and the class average and their grade, they still wanted it - so they got it! And I have even given a rather detailed and poor reference to a student, after I told the student directly that’s what would happen, because they were adamant that they wanted it anyways. 
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Medase in Picking a Masters- Clinical Research or Basic Sciences?   
    Yes, but the challenges would be negotiating such a position with protected research time (into which your clinical and administrative commitments would likely spill over). If you wished to be a PI running your own basic science lab, you'd need funding, space, employees, etc. and would be competing for grants against full-time PhD researchers.
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Medase in Picking a Masters- Clinical Research or Basic Sciences?   
    It depends on what you mean by "sticking with research after med school." Do you see yourself as someone who primarily sees patients in an academic centre, and is involved in some research projects, versus someone who devotes significant time to research and runs their own program, securing grants and employing staff etc.
  22. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Medase in Picking a Masters- Clinical Research or Basic Sciences?   
    To me, 60/40 time split would actually imply the latter (physician scientist), if you're talking 3 clinical days and 2 research days (and extra off hours likely devoted to research as well).
    For many physicians in an academic centre, they essentially have a 100% clinical workload (which they need to work teaching into as well) and all the research is done on their own time, with maybe some academic days here and there (depends on the status of the particular department)... 
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clopidogrel in General Question About Residency Match   
    In that case, you should delay your graduation while you undertake your enrichment year, so that you can graduate and match the same year.
    As you may have read, one strategy after going unmatched is to work closely with a department, in hopes of gaining a spot there next round.
    Otherwise, I'm not sure that being remembered as an unmatched candidate is all that desirable, especially when you are competing against a fresh cohort of potential stars...
  24. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from blah1234 in General Question About Residency Match   
    Stigma (referred to in the comments of the blog you were unable to access). The CaRMS application actually allows programs to filter their applications and choose to look at current year grads only. How many actually use this as a criterion, I can't comment, but the perception of "damaged goods" is definitely there, no matter how unfair it might be.
  25. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clopidogrel in General Question About Residency Match   
    Stigma (referred to in the comments of the blog you were unable to access). The CaRMS application actually allows programs to filter their applications and choose to look at current year grads only. How many actually use this as a criterion, I can't comment, but the perception of "damaged goods" is definitely there, no matter how unfair it might be.
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