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Lactic Folly

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  1. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clopidogrel in General Question About Residency Match   
    https://med-fom-ubcmj.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2019/03/Letter-3.pdf
    https://meds.queensu.ca/ugme-blog/archives/3568
    https://healthydebate.ca/2018/03/topic/medical-students-carms
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from blah1234 in General Question About Residency Match   
    Stigma (referred to in the comments of the blog you were unable to access). The CaRMS application actually allows programs to filter their applications and choose to look at current year grads only. How many actually use this as a criterion, I can't comment, but the perception of "damaged goods" is definitely there, no matter how unfair it might be.
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from JohnGrisham in Last minute backup with family   
    Given you said there is no overlap between FM and your specialty of choice, is there any other reasonable backup specialty, even if your CV is not geared towards that field? Is FM genuinely your second choice of career?
    I can't advise on programs, but as you said, FM programs in popular locations will be competitive. There are other less competitive specialties from which it might be easier to transfer into FM than the other way around.
    With regards to applying to something that is obviously not your interest on paper, I was told once that you can make the point in your personal statement "yes, I like {my first choice}... and I also like FM." Probably our FM posters could comment more on how effective this is likely to be.
  4. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to NLengr in Federal Election 2019   
    Did the CBC vote compass last night. I ended up tied between the Liberals and the Conservatives. 
    /pain of being socially liberal and financially conservative.....
    //Trump impeachment keeps distracting me from the Canadian election. 
  5. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Compton in Considering Med   
    It could be that the default value for full-time work on a non-medical specific job posting website is 40 hours/week. What type of salaried, 40 hr/week position would be available to a GP in a hospital or urgent care centre? Unless it's administrative, nothing clinical comes to mind readily.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Considering Med   
    It could be that the default value for full-time work on a non-medical specific job posting website is 40 hours/week. What type of salaried, 40 hr/week position would be available to a GP in a hospital or urgent care centre? Unless it's administrative, nothing clinical comes to mind readily.
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from JohnGrisham in Considering Med   
    It could be that the default value for full-time work on a non-medical specific job posting website is 40 hours/week. What type of salaried, 40 hr/week position would be available to a GP in a hospital or urgent care centre? Unless it's administrative, nothing clinical comes to mind readily.
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Considering Med   
    +1. The common tendency is to just look at the salary number... without factoring in hours worked, and pensions which can be substantial. I wouldn't be surprised if you were already doing better on a per hour basis.
    OP, you mentioned stress of residency, but not the stress of working as a staff physician. Often that is hard to appreciate from the outside; but imagine that with increased autonomy comes the increased responsibility and stress for being the person ultimately responsible for your patients' care, overseeing the work of residents and PAs, taking work home on a regular basis... How do you think you would deal with that?
  9. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from anonymouspls in Rads observerships   
    Well, observing the work is by definition what an observership is. A student (especially on elective) might also be provided with teaching files to review. 
    The main advantage of shadowing in pre-clerkship is that you get to see the work environment and learn more about the career from direct interaction with physicians in that field. If you already have access to this, then don't go if you feel it won't be a good use of time - if any boredom or disinterest leaks through, it will make a negative impression. 
    Although I'm usually a proponent of being proactive when it comes to career planning, it's still a bit early for networking, unless you are considering the field very highly and trying to make connections for a summer research project. 
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from yonas in Family Medicine Popularity   
    I suspect you are both overestimating specialty earning potential and lifestyle, and underestimating family practice earning potential. Remember, in a fee-for-service environment, the amount you make is directly tied to the amount you work. I highly doubt there is a difference of 500k/yr for people working similar hours per week..
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from member_225 in First year radiology salary   
    Job market goes in cycles - right now it doesn't seem so bad. Even at its tightest, I don't think it's ever been at the point of needing to look abroad. Of course, it depends on your flexibility (are you tied to a specific location or type of position). Talking to those residents/fellows currently on the interview trail will give you the best indication. 
    If you're earlier in medical training, if you are sensible with money, you shouldn't have difficulty paying off loans, etc. Should be on par with other specialist physicians.
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to blah1234 in IM Burnout - Ambulatory and Better Lifestyle practice models?   
    I was a professional before medicine and I can say that it's not worth it for the money. Yes, I make a comfortable living and do well but if I wanted to optimize for money I would've been much further ahead at my old job. People underestimate the value of investing 10+ years into education not to mention the debt load. I think my hours are fine now but residency was brutal and I think I sacrificed a lot in my personal life to make this dream of mine happen.

    I don't think that there is only one path to success and happiness, and medicine definitely isn't the only one. It is an amazing job for some people and it is a terrible job for others. Unfortunately, the system is designed so that most students don't find out until it's too late to leave. 
  13. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from openminded10 in Starting with a 2-week elective   
    There are books like First Aid for the Wards and How to be a Truly Excellent Junior Medical Student. The material tends to 'gel' more once you have actually had firsthand exposure to the wards, I find, so set aside some time at the start of the rotation to refresh your reading. 
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from frenchpress in Endocrinology?   
    I dunno, having worked in an in-hospital setting for several years, I have yet to experience this at all. It's actually a relief to have a straightforward case once in a while - it seems there are so many diagnostic and management dilemmas, and unexpected complications that can occur in the acute setting. Shades of grey everywhere - someone might have some signs for, but other signs against cholecystitis. Could have an ill unstable patient but the intervention is risky - how to proceed? (hindsight is 20/20 of course). Daily multidisciplinary cancer rounds debating extent of disease and management (is it posttreatment change or recurrence? Chemo/rad/surg or monitor?) Even the "routine"  mammo/CXR is often an exercise in judgment - is that contour or asymmetry within the range of normal? Should we call the patient back (anxiety/radiation/biopsy) or dismiss it (could we be missing some pathology)?
    Very different from my experience as a student in urban family medicine. Despite the much more controllable/favourable hours, given the higher proportion of prescription refills and well checkups as above, and psychosocial/life issues not possible to adequately address in a standard appointment slot, it wasn't for me. Also, the challenge of sorting out the worried well from someone who has something sinister brewing was daunting.
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Wachaa in Endocrinology?   
    I dunno, having worked in an in-hospital setting for several years, I have yet to experience this at all. It's actually a relief to have a straightforward case once in a while - it seems there are so many diagnostic and management dilemmas, and unexpected complications that can occur in the acute setting. Shades of grey everywhere - someone might have some signs for, but other signs against cholecystitis. Could have an ill unstable patient but the intervention is risky - how to proceed? (hindsight is 20/20 of course). Daily multidisciplinary cancer rounds debating extent of disease and management (is it posttreatment change or recurrence? Chemo/rad/surg or monitor?) Even the "routine"  mammo/CXR is often an exercise in judgment - is that contour or asymmetry within the range of normal? Should we call the patient back (anxiety/radiation/biopsy) or dismiss it (could we be missing some pathology)?
    Very different from my experience as a student in urban family medicine. Despite the much more controllable/favourable hours, given the higher proportion of prescription refills and well checkups as above, and psychosocial/life issues not possible to adequately address in a standard appointment slot, it wasn't for me. Also, the challenge of sorting out the worried well from someone who has something sinister brewing was daunting.
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Future_MD35 in Interventional Radiology   
    IR seems quite busy. I do know those who see patients in clinic and admit them as MRP. 
    Best to connect with those at your institution, or through CAIR:
    https://www.cairweb.ca/en/becoming-an-ir/introduction-to-ir/
  17. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Mellow Pharaoh in Weird EC's?   
    Although students may be more likely to be gamers themselves and not stigmatize them, how they'd feel about your judgment in choosing to highlight it as an EC is really a separate question. Most schools do incorporate students into the admissions process. And although I'd conjecture that it would be rare to have a student who hasn't played online games at all, it is still uncommon to highlight as a major leadership EC, rather than as one of several outside hobbies. I think there have been discussions in the past about including contributions on premed101 on one's application - see if you can find those threads.
  18. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LittleDaisy in Top 100 physician-identified OHIP billings released   
    It would be one thing to simply focus on the privilege that professionals enjoy, but it seems that often detractors additionally seek to minimize the hard work, care and contribution to others' welfare, in order to support their narrative. It is this part that I think is most regrettable, rather than the discussion of privilege itself.
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from polarbear123 in Clothes   
    Regarding clinical activities, if white coats are in use at your institution, this instantly elevates the professional appearance of whatever you might be wearing underneath.
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MDLaval in PGY 1 year for Rads   
    I think the general expectation would be to work hard, pitch in wherever possible, learn as much as you can, and develop good relationships with your surgical colleagues. Time in OR versus on ward/consults would depend on what the team needs, and what the team composition is. I doubt too much would be expected of you procedurally as you'd be behind any surgical residents wanting to gain more operating experience - at least in my experience, going to the OR was primarily an educational venture. That being said, I did prefer consults/ward management, as understanding the clinical context and reasoning is necessary to know how to provide useful and relevant recommendations and information as a future imaging consultant. (Plus, I couldn't always see what was happening in the OR clearly, and found surgical atlases more helpful to learn about procedures.)  In general, surgical rotations are the more higher yield rotations during PGY-1.
    In terms of general tips, you probably will never have as light a schedule as in PGY-1 (due to lack of outside reading requirement on even heavy in-house call rotations), so if you have any thoughts about research projects, residents who had ideas and started working on them early on have generally been glad they did so (though I don't think this is the majority by any means, and not something I myself did - just thought about in hindsight).  Doing some online cases can also help you hit the ground running with respect to detection/description/interpretation once PGY-2 starts. Or simply enjoy the relative lack of pressure to do anything on top of taking good care of your patients at an intern level for now  
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from daleader in Med Onc/Rad Onc   
    http://www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/health-policy/employment-study-e
  22. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from tavenan in Poor Undergrad - give up Derm?   
    No disrespect to OP, but I don't think the academic record they describe would really apply to many others in the pool...
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from GrouchoMarx in Poor Undergrad - give up Derm?   
    Perhaps you or your institution are doing something right (for example, posing questions to individual students rather than to a group as a whole?). Unfortunately, given the stress over clerkship evaluations with regards to residency matching, my medical school friends and I found the environment quite competitive. Often it was uncomfortable to answer questions correctly in front of peers, or to be in the right place at the right time and be offered a procedure that not everyone else had yet had the opportunity to do, because of the thinly veiled hostility that could result (of course, when staff/residents were out of earshot; good cheer was the norm until then). 
    Back to the original question, I agree that a student's candidacy is based on their current performance and if felt to be strong, it is unlikely that the undergrad transcript would make any dent in their desirability. If it's being used as a discriminator, the program is probably on the fence about the student anyway.
  24. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from ZBL in Poor Undergrad - give up Derm?   
    Perhaps you or your institution are doing something right (for example, posing questions to individual students rather than to a group as a whole?). Unfortunately, given the stress over clerkship evaluations with regards to residency matching, my medical school friends and I found the environment quite competitive. Often it was uncomfortable to answer questions correctly in front of peers, or to be in the right place at the right time and be offered a procedure that not everyone else had yet had the opportunity to do, because of the thinly veiled hostility that could result (of course, when staff/residents were out of earshot; good cheer was the norm until then). 
    Back to the original question, I agree that a student's candidacy is based on their current performance and if felt to be strong, it is unlikely that the undergrad transcript would make any dent in their desirability. If it's being used as a discriminator, the program is probably on the fence about the student anyway.
  25. Haha
    Lactic Folly reacted to Hellothere77 in How much of medschool is like first aid class?   
    Most med students are terrible at everything, don't worry
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