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Lactic Folly

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  1. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from GrouchoMarx in Poor Undergrad - give up Derm?   
    Perhaps you or your institution are doing something right (for example, posing questions to individual students rather than to a group as a whole?). Unfortunately, given the stress over clerkship evaluations with regards to residency matching, my medical school friends and I found the environment quite competitive. Often it was uncomfortable to answer questions correctly in front of peers, or to be in the right place at the right time and be offered a procedure that not everyone else had yet had the opportunity to do, because of the thinly veiled hostility that could result (of course, when staff/residents were out of earshot; good cheer was the norm until then). 
    Back to the original question, I agree that a student's candidacy is based on their current performance and if felt to be strong, it is unlikely that the undergrad transcript would make any dent in their desirability. If it's being used as a discriminator, the program is probably on the fence about the student anyway.
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from ZBL in Poor Undergrad - give up Derm?   
    Perhaps you or your institution are doing something right (for example, posing questions to individual students rather than to a group as a whole?). Unfortunately, given the stress over clerkship evaluations with regards to residency matching, my medical school friends and I found the environment quite competitive. Often it was uncomfortable to answer questions correctly in front of peers, or to be in the right place at the right time and be offered a procedure that not everyone else had yet had the opportunity to do, because of the thinly veiled hostility that could result (of course, when staff/residents were out of earshot; good cheer was the norm until then). 
    Back to the original question, I agree that a student's candidacy is based on their current performance and if felt to be strong, it is unlikely that the undergrad transcript would make any dent in their desirability. If it's being used as a discriminator, the program is probably on the fence about the student anyway.
  3. Haha
    Lactic Folly reacted to Hellothere77 in How much of medschool is like first aid class?   
    Most med students are terrible at everything, don't worry
  4. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from targaryen in Getting mostly satisfactory and few outstanding in my evaluation   
    New study published in Academic Medicine:
    https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Abstract/publishahead/Which_Student_Characteristics_Are_Most_Important.97556.aspx
    "Professionalism components, clinical reasoning, and curiosity were among the most important characteristics distinguishing high-performing clerkship students."
  5. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from blah1234 in Pediatric subspecialties income - why lower than internal medicine   
    I agree with blah1234. Perhaps some of the mentors you mention are not the best role models for making choices with respect to job satisfaction, and you should view their perspective as more of a precautionary tale. I find medicine such a challenging and ever-evolving field, in both human and technical aspects, that if one is actively engaged in its practice, I can't imagine it ever becoming boring. Stressful and leading to burnout? Sure. But not mundane - there's so much to tackle just to be able to provide an excellent quality of care. 
    With regards to lifestyle friendly and well-compensated (by this I assume you mean when compared to other physicians, not compared to the general population), these ideas are not quite compatible in a fee-for-service environment. Compensation is not generally offered without an expectation of hard work in return. I will also say that although everyone's personal situation varies, if a staff physician is working full-time and struggling to pay their mortgage, I would suspect it's the mortgage and not their remuneration that is the primary problem. Live within (preferably below) your means.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from targaryen in Getting mostly satisfactory and few outstanding in my evaluation   
    It's true that medical students are already a select bunch, so the majority will be in the "at expectation" category which is fine. Getting a few outstanding evals is great. 
    It's also true that evaluations are often subjective, though I think a significant part of it is that preceptors are often pulled in many directions and therefore making assessments based on limited interactions, so an initial impression may 'stick,' or the one half-day they work with you (plus brief comments from others) may not be completely reflective of your overall performance. 
    That being said, I think it's commendable to aim for improved performance. If in the same class, most students are achieving mostly at expectation, but a few manage to achieve above expectation in more rotations, they are likely performing differently. It may not be completely straightforward to do so, as I suspect that outstanding students simply perform higher than expected for their level of training (i.e. work is more like that of a resident, requires fewer corrections or additions from the supervisor).  
    That being said, I think that if a student took the initiative to seek feedback early on (before the standard midterm eval) with the intention to achieve a higher level of performance (not just seeking a letter of reference), it wouldn't be a common thing to do, and this demonstrated motivation would set them above their peers. It might prompt the preceptor to spend extra time and attention interacting with them to provide the requested feedback, and assuming this feedback is acted upon, it may in turn improve the evaluation. 
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MDLaval in PGY 1 year for Rads   
    I think the general expectation would be to work hard, pitch in wherever possible, learn as much as you can, and develop good relationships with your surgical colleagues. Time in OR versus on ward/consults would depend on what the team needs, and what the team composition is. I doubt too much would be expected of you procedurally as you'd be behind any surgical residents wanting to gain more operating experience - at least in my experience, going to the OR was primarily an educational venture. That being said, I did prefer consults/ward management, as understanding the clinical context and reasoning is necessary to know how to provide useful and relevant recommendations and information as a future imaging consultant. (Plus, I couldn't always see what was happening in the OR clearly, and found surgical atlases more helpful to learn about procedures.)  In general, surgical rotations are the more higher yield rotations during PGY-1.
    In terms of general tips, you probably will never have as light a schedule as in PGY-1 (due to lack of outside reading requirement on even heavy in-house call rotations), so if you have any thoughts about research projects, residents who had ideas and started working on them early on have generally been glad they did so (though I don't think this is the majority by any means, and not something I myself did - just thought about in hindsight).  Doing some online cases can also help you hit the ground running with respect to detection/description/interpretation once PGY-2 starts. Or simply enjoy the relative lack of pressure to do anything on top of taking good care of your patients at an intern level for now  
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Nirvanesthesia in Submitted vs Accepted vs Published Research   
    I am not sure of the current CaRMS format, but it would be appropriate to distinguish these categories on your CV, and include the date submitted or accepted if applicable. Published and accepted should be of similar weight; submitted is better than simply having worked on a project, since it indicates your project has progressed to final writeup. 
    There isn't a strict relative weighting for papers - it depends on your role, and the quality and impact of the project. But only having submitted and no published papers might suggest you have only begun involvement in research recently.
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from medigeek in Admitted but never kissed a girl   
    As others have said, try focusing on being friends with women first. Having intentions of dating in the back of your mind leads to you feeling that you are making an approach rather than simply talking to someone normally. These underlying hopes/expectations lead to anxiety, which leads to avoidance, which reinforces your anxiety and discomfort.
    If you simply try to socialize/ be friendly with women, with a similar mindset of simply enjoying conversation and sharing interests as you would your other male friends (instead of the subtle pressure of wanting something which leads to feeling like a creep), you will be able to relax more and have more positive interactions. These increased experiences will decrease your anxiety and improve your confidence overall. Getting to know people gradually over time also will improve your odds of developing a genuine relationship. 
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in How could personality issue prevent someone from matching?   
    Well, first of all, CaRMS is simply too competitive to say that someone will match to their first choice if only they have no issues. Many solid students still go unmatched, unfortunately.
    That being said, as stated in your title, yes, a personality issue could hamper one's chances of matching. This could be someone who is abrasive, a poor team player, or anything that leads people in a program to not want to work with them. Sometimes such people have better chances at other schools where they are not well known.
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bandicoot in What will help me get my top choices in radiology?   
    Agree - you can't do electives at every school, and remember most people will have similarly positive evals and references, so you need to stand out in some way to get interviews at schools you haven't done electives at (that being said, what they might be looking for can be variable).
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to Edict in What will help me get my top choices in radiology?   
    Pubs probably do matter in radiology. Doing electives where you want to match is the must do thing, but often you need a cherry on top and that can come in the form of research or other meaningful ECs. Also, know your target, if your top choice is a research heavy school, they may value research more. I've heard from a few toronto rads staff that research is valued.
    Also for rads, look up the residents and see if they have publications. You may be surprised. 
     
  13. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from ATG4B in 3yr vs 4yr finances - What would you do?   
    First, congrats! Do you have *any* reason to prefer Calgary other than the difference in cost? Does the difference in program length matter to you otherwise? How sure are you of the residency programs you'd apply to or are you completely undecided at this point?
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from hiyayosup in How do you deal with a bad break up?   
    Don't give up now! Think how much better you'll feel when you've succeeded and left your ex behind. Don't give him a reason to look back and feel self-satisfied, instead of regretful.
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Supreme Court ruling may pave way to identification of Ontario’s top-billing physicians   
    Response from OMA:
    https://www.oma.org/sections/news-events/news-room/all-news-releases/release-of-physician-billings-data-confirms-high-patient-demand-and-commitment-of-ontarios-doctors/
    Release of Physician Billings Data Confirms High Patient Demand and Commitment of Ontario's Doctors
    Ontario’s physicians care for more than 300,000 patients every day. They are committed to the health and well-being of every resident of this province. The physician billings released today, as a result of the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision not to grant leave to appeal, clearly shows the demand for health care services and the time, commitment and dedication of Ontario’s doctors to providing this care.
    It is important to keep in mind that:
    Every billing represents a distinct health care service delivered to patients in Ontario.
    These physicians can only bill for every patient they examine, every test they interpret, or every procedure they perform. Every billing submitted means one more Ontario resident treated, and one fewer patient waiting for a needed service. The priority for Ontario’s doctors is to treat and care for more patients, not less.
    Ontario’s doctors are committed to working with the Government of Ontario to improve the delivery of care for patients and end hallway medicine.
    We are committed to working with government to improve how health care services are delivered to reduce both costs and waiting lists. For example, the OMA recommended and was granted the formation of a joint Appropriateness Working Group.
    The amount a physician bills for a service is not their salary or take-home pay.
    From their OHIP billings, physicians must pay for professional and support staff salaries, office space, supplies and equipment, all of which are needed to treat patients. On average, these expenses account for 30 percent of the amount billed, however this can be as high as 50 percent.
    Ontario patients will continue to be the top priority of Ontario’s 31,500 doctors. We look forward to working with the provincial government and all of our partners in the system to deliver the health care Ontarians need and deserve.
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from ChemPetE in Supreme Court ruling may pave way to identification of Ontario’s top-billing physicians   
    What's often left out of a discussion focused on billings/overhead is the amount of work/care that is provided. Hospital-based rads may have fewer overhead expenses than clinic-based; but if patient volumes and higher acuity/complexity are considered, the more intense workloads mean that on an hourly basis, income probably does not differ as much from the other hospital-based physicians that I know of.
    Given that in a hospital, we all expect:
    1) the imaging department to be running as efficiently as possible to accommodate the volume of studies requested and reduce the amount of time patients have to wait for tests
    2) high quality interpretations and reports (which obviously take time to do properly)
    3) reports to be released as quickly as possible to support patient care
    this means ++after hours work to keep on top of things on a regular basis. Not on call, but last week was working basically from 7 am to 1 am except for a short dinner break, and then continuing over the weekend as the scanners keep running (we are a bit short-staffed right now).  Admin work and meetings (e.g. quality improvement) are also part of a hospital-based practice, but if they can't be scheduled on days off, it means putting off less urgent clinical work to accommodate.
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to sangria in Feeling alone in med school   
    OP, recognize that your perceived introversion is not a hindrance. I know that you are referring to not fitting in and feeling alone as a pre clerk - the day to day "which group do I sit with" or "what social event is coming up next".  Find 1 or 2 people whom you can gel with a bit more and start there.  You are already doing what you are supposed to do by being cordial and friendly and open.  Keep that up.  There is nothing wrong with you. 
    I've felt the same way -- clerkship is such a breath of fresh air. It is your ability to connect with patients and the people you work with in a professional setting that matters.  In life, you aren't going to form tight bonds with everyone, and that's ok.  Do find supports in or out of the faculty.  Reach out to your family and friends back home.  Seek out interests outside of medicine.  You are going to be a great doctor. 
     
  18. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in How important is it to have a fun personality?   
    Agree, residency is more a job interview than a social club. At least you know that you did well enough during medical school interviews to be accepted.
    PDs want someone who will do well in the program i.e. works hard, doesn't cause trouble, contributes to program initiatives and is a good team player. I think most people make the distinction between fun to hang out with and pleasant to work with.
    I had a similar question about being considered a "quiet" student, and was advised that it's more those students who come across as overbearing that run into difficulties due to their personalities during the match.
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to LostLamb in How important is it to have a fun personality?   
    To really know if your personality is a hindrance, you need to identify and then outright ask someone or several someone’s you trust what their impressions are of you. 
    I wouldn’t worry about being too shy or introverted. Medicine contains all kinds of folks. I’d worry more about being too “fun” as you describe it. That, too, can get people in trouble.
    good luck!
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Feeling alone in med school   
    Yup. I have one close friend from medical school days. Which is one more than I would have had otherwise, so, win.
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Feeling alone in med school   
    Sorry to hear. Do you have any interests you can explore outside of medical school in your new city? That being said, it's only 1st year, and maybe you can deepen your bond with the 1% over the 2nd year. Like high school, medical school will also end, and it gets better afterwards. Here's to finding your tribe in residency.
  22. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Feeling alone in med school   
    Sorry to hear. Do you have any interests you can explore outside of medical school in your new city? That being said, it's only 1st year, and maybe you can deepen your bond with the 1% over the 2nd year. Like high school, medical school will also end, and it gets better afterwards. Here's to finding your tribe in residency.
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from chateau22 in Feeling alone in med school   
    Sorry to hear. Do you have any interests you can explore outside of medical school in your new city? That being said, it's only 1st year, and maybe you can deepen your bond with the 1% over the 2nd year. Like high school, medical school will also end, and it gets better afterwards. Here's to finding your tribe in residency.
  24. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from ACHQ in Is it possible to transfer into the specialty you were unmatched from?   
    I'm not too familiar with the process personally, but it's doubtful any listing of potential vacancies is made publicly available by PGME. According to the info on the site, it looks like applicants submit their interest and then it's forwarded to PGME/programs to see if there are any openings.
  25. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in "Are you sure you want to go into family?"   
    No surgeon I worked with ever tried to convince me to go into surgery. Although when I was on surgery as an off-service PGY-1, I was mistaken for an on-service resident and placed in charge of the team when the chief was away...
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