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Lactic Folly

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  1. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Grand Rounds and Other ways to stand out   
    While I wouldn't go so far as to say the interview has no weight, I believe that there is a common perception (likely not unwarranted) that anyone can be personable, enthusiastic and present oneself as a congenial team player for 20 min, but this may or may not correlate to their actual performance once in the program. Therefore, more weight is placed on other parts of the application such as elective performance, references, and CV. This approach is more practical than political in basis IMO. Having made it through medical school admissions already, most people interview pretty well at this point in their careers, and are difficult to distinguish based on a limited interaction (unless they are exceptionally charming, or do something to turn the interviewers off).
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from mitmtl in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from sangria in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  4. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from missindep in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  5. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  7. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from throwaway756 in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from CanMedMedMed in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from somebowdy in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from blah1234 in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Darkchrono in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  13. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from JohnGrisham in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.'
    You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school.
    Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from NeuroD in Grand Rounds and Other ways to stand out   
    Yes, being considered annoying is the kiss of death. Chances are better for a less well-known candidate who looks good at interview/application. They still have that halo of excitement and potential, unsullied by the pitfalls that can come with too much exposure. The point of more exposure is to make people feel that you belong in that program - not to annoy them, which is the opposite effect.
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Bringing up past trauma during interview?   
    It would be better to focus on what you have done/accomplished, rather than what happened to you if possible. Have you been involved in volunteer or advocacy work related to helping others through a similar experience? Can you speak about your unique empathy and motivation to help such patients?
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from boggie111 in Grand Rounds and Other ways to stand out   
    Yes, being considered annoying is the kiss of death. Chances are better for a less well-known candidate who looks good at interview/application. They still have that halo of excitement and potential, unsullied by the pitfalls that can come with too much exposure. The point of more exposure is to make people feel that you belong in that program - not to annoy them, which is the opposite effect.
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Can introverts get into med school? Should they be doctors?   
    Of course. Your definition of introversion (recharging through some alone downtime) is what's accepted for the term, and the admission person's implication that there is any adverse relationship with how well one works with others, or with med school/interview performance is most likely unfounded. People all have their own biases, often preferring those who they see as similar to themselves (same hobbies or outward personality), so don't be disheartened by such comments even if they seem to come from an "official" source - if it doesn't make it into the formula for med school admissions, it ultimately won't make a difference.
  18. Haha
    Lactic Folly reacted to Intrepid86 in Baby shower gift   
    Unless they're naming the baby after you I wouldn't spend $200.
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from henslice in Virtual Patient   
    Yes, definitely. As you said, simulated patients with intentionally (real-life) ambiguous presentations can help develop critical thinking skills in diagnosis. Also, it would be a way to ensure that students are exposed to the necessary breadth of patient presentations (for example, both common and uncommon presentations of critical diagnoses, which we cannot rely on chance alone for exposure during clinical rotations). I've seen a number of studies on this.
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to PilotMD in More females than males in medicine?   
    The topic is an interesting one - at the risk of offending 'snowflakes' who may be perusing the forum, I will give my two cents.
    First - I do not think women make better physicians or surgeons. That is, I do not believe there is some inherent advantage conferred by a double X chromosome that results in improved clinical outcomes. I believe that anyone is capable of being a great physician (or firefighter, or nurse, or teacher, or....) regardless of gender (or sexual orientation, religious belief, political leanings, etc). However, there is good data to suggest that women have better outcomes (large internal medicine study, recent BMJ article looking at female surgeons, etc). The question is why? If we focus on gender, we aren't going to get anywhere. We have to look past gender and focus on things that truly matter. For example, in the surgeon study, one of the hypothesis from the lead author is that perhaps women surgeons fair better due in part to surgery self selecting for the best female applicants (that is, due to the nature of surgery - aka: old boys club - women work harder to gain access to these specialties, as such, they are on average a more elite cohort then their male counterparts). Another reason could be communication - perhaps women spend more time with their patients, communicate better expectation and outcomes then their male colleagues and this translates into better care. I have one partner who calls all his patient 1 day after they have been discharged to 'check in' - his readmission rates are the lowest amongst our group and he  personal attributes this as one factor (he is able to reassure patients that certain things are normal, etc). The bottom line is - we need to figure out why we are seeing these findings so that we can generalize these practice patterns to improve on patient outcomes (whether it be better communication, more time spent with patients, more empathy, etc). 
    As to why their are more females in medical school then men - who cares. Equality is not about outcome, it is about opportunity. Choosing an individual for a particular job (or program of study, or whatever) should be based on that individuals abilities, skills, potential, etc. and not on irrelevant aspects such as gender, sexual orientation, religious belief, marital status, etc. Pick the best person for the job, period. So if we believe that medical school selection is not biased to these irrelevant characteristics (which I do), then if 60% of the top applicants are female (or male), then so be it. Now, it's definitely worth studying why this is being observed (as mentioned already, women may perform better in MMI interviews - aka communication, problem solving, etc. - and there may be a larger cohort of women in university to begin with). Again, it is not gender, but some other characteristics that are driving these observed differences - focus on those and leave irrelevant factors out of it. 
    My thoughts
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from capital in Repeat year competitive matching potential   
    A student who impresses is someone who stands out from their peers, assuming the majority pursuing a 'very competitive specialty' are likeable and have a good knowledge base. Someone the program considers a "star" who is at the top of the application pile, and wishes to recruit. Agree that it can be difficult to evaluate from the student's perspective, but the top students in the country are likely to have CVs containing many awards and accomplishments. Given the shadowing and research you have already done, have you received much feedback from the department? Were you able to produce a high quality or quantity of work during your research experience?
    If you have extenuating circumstances leading to the academic repeat, I suppose a superior USMLE score could help provide reassurance if you explained it in your personal statement. But you would really need excellent performance, 9x% percentile+... just my opinion. 
  22. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from capital in Repeat year competitive matching potential   
    If it is a very competitive specialty and the academic issue is not difficult to see on the transcript, I suspect an interview offer would already mean it's been glossed over (except at one's home school which may offer a courtesy interview). As said above, even solid candidates with no red flags may not be offered very many interviews, and end up unmatched or in a backup field.
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    I second Butterfly_'s post. I wouldn't push others to enter medicine (obviously a personal decision, and not a career suitable for everyone), or say that someone should pursue it all costs (the assumption is that anyone making multiple application attempts would be continuing with their backup career plan at the same time).
    However, I would never dissuade anyone from applying to medicine, as long as they have a realistic idea of what they're getting into. Many other careers also have their own significant stresses with much less job security. We are now in the middle of a cold spell, yet I'm seeing an increased number of people standing at intersections holding cardboard signs for help. I should count my blessings that I have hospital privileges and do not have to worry about being laid off due to business downturn or restructuring.
  24. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    What would those of you dissatisfied with medicine have done instead? I have extended family in engineering, law... the dentists on this board also speak of their challenges.
  25. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from capital in Repeat year competitive matching potential   
    Agree, your main shot will be at programs that are familiar and impressed enough with you that they are willing to overlook the blemish on your record. Are you someone who can really "wow" in person during an elective?
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