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Lactic Folly

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  1. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    I second Butterfly_'s post. I wouldn't push others to enter medicine (obviously a personal decision, and not a career suitable for everyone), or say that someone should pursue it all costs (the assumption is that anyone making multiple application attempts would be continuing with their backup career plan at the same time).
    However, I would never dissuade anyone from applying to medicine, as long as they have a realistic idea of what they're getting into. Many other careers also have their own significant stresses with much less job security. We are now in the middle of a cold spell, yet I'm seeing an increased number of people standing at intersections holding cardboard signs for help. I should count my blessings that I have hospital privileges and do not have to worry about being laid off due to business downturn or restructuring.
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    What would those of you dissatisfied with medicine have done instead? I have extended family in engineering, law... the dentists on this board also speak of their challenges.
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from capital in Repeat year competitive matching potential   
    Agree, your main shot will be at programs that are familiar and impressed enough with you that they are willing to overlook the blemish on your record. Are you someone who can really "wow" in person during an elective?
  4. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    I second Butterfly_'s post. I wouldn't push others to enter medicine (obviously a personal decision, and not a career suitable for everyone), or say that someone should pursue it all costs (the assumption is that anyone making multiple application attempts would be continuing with their backup career plan at the same time).
    However, I would never dissuade anyone from applying to medicine, as long as they have a realistic idea of what they're getting into. Many other careers also have their own significant stresses with much less job security. We are now in the middle of a cold spell, yet I'm seeing an increased number of people standing at intersections holding cardboard signs for help. I should count my blessings that I have hospital privileges and do not have to worry about being laid off due to business downturn or restructuring.
  5. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to Butterfly_ in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    There are always pros and cons to any career. Everyone has different preferences, priorities, and aspirations.  Value and worth, these concepts can only be answered by the person themselves. What may be worth millions to one person might be worth nothing to another. 
    Medicine isn't the only profession where people can strive for years and years without fruition. Many entrepreneurs in business work decades until they have a successful product to market. Lawyers can take years to become a partner in a well-known firm. Accountants take numerous exams and years of auditing to become chartered professionals. Other careers are just as difficult and can take just as much sacrifice. 
    Personally, I think having the ability to practice medicine is a privilege and honor. Not many careers have the opportunity to care, heal, and relieve suffering. To me, it is a dream worth sacrificing for. And being in medical school now, everyday I feel so grateful to be here. Compared to my previous career, I feel so much happier, excited, and motivated.
    Having spoken to quite a few docs myself, I find that there is dichotomy of views --some love their jobs, some hate it. 
    For the ones that hate it, perhaps this has to do with pursuing medicine for the wrong reasons, or that they haven't had the opportunity to pursue any other career prior to entering medicine, or maybe its burn out. I'm not sure. 

    But for the ones that love it, it's more than just a job or a career. It's a calling. I had a tutor that told me once, "I have been practicing medicine for almost 50 years. I can't think of anything else more fulfilling and rewarding. If I could go back in time and do it all over again, I would in a heartbeat." 
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from medigeek in Interview with top choice program, do you tell them?   
    Yes, I would mention the family ties. It helps make your interest more convincing/sincere and programs would like to know that you have a personal support system. Your personal reasons will be noted as long as you have mentioned them in your personal statement/interview, and I wouldn't emphasize them to the detriment of other factors - you want to avoid making it sound like your outside commitments might interfere with your availability to the program. 
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Comparing salaried vs private positions   
    Numbers aside, I'd encourage you to think about your long-term goals and how each position might set you up accordingly. Would you want to take the opportunity to locum first and learn about the business side of medicine, and then move into a salaried, or another type of position if you want? It's often valuable to gain experience working in a number of different settings, unless an ideal position is currently available. 
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from garlic in Radiology as a backup...?   
    Also differ with this. By the same reasoning, AI could also equally replace other fields of medicine (input patient symptoms/physical exam/labwork for a diagnosis).
    We have had computer-assisted detection in mammography for many years now, and most of the findings flagged by the computer are dismissed upon human review (the technology helps as a second reader for increased sensitivity, but if everything flagged was pursued, this would lead to a huge number of workups and anxiety). 
    Contrary to common perception of pattern recognition (appearance x = diagnosis y), much of image interpretation is far from black and white, and it may be necessary to decide whether a finding is even real or could be within the range of normal, using one's knowledge of additional patient factors / history and value system to help decide how to word the final report and recommendations.
    The other question of course is who will shoulder responsibility if the machine gets it wrong, so it is likely that technology will continue to serve as an aid to human physicians as tere said.
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from medigeek in Value of personal statements (carms apps) & typos, importance ??   
    It depends on the program and reviewer. I don't know if there tends to be great variation in the content that people write, outside of their particular backgrounds. You'd want to avoid any statements leading to a raised eyebrow, of course.
    Similarly, the impact of a typo would depend on who is reading it. Some people might not even notice it, or if they do it, brush it off as insignificant. Others might hold the view if that this program was really a top pick, you would place importance on submitting the best application you could, and proofread it carefully before submitting.
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from medigeek in Value of personal statements (carms apps) & typos, importance ??   
    Examples:
    Something that shows you don't have a realistic understanding of the specialty you're applying for.
    Stating your passion for field X when you're applying to field Y.
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from medigeek in Value of personal statements (carms apps) & typos, importance ??   
    Yes, agree, I forgot to mention that a strong personal letter should include some specific reasons as to why the program/location is a good fit for you. This can help set applicants apart when a program is trying to decide among candidates they have no prior knowledge of.
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from vicpremed in Performed Poorly In All 5 Interviews... Please Help!   
    Mostly body language / facial expression - things that I can't assess directly myself. But also good to hear how the answers - when speaking, one may not notice all the ahh's and umm's that are apparent to another listener.
  13. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from DeeplySuperficial in How to make good use of pre-clerkship summer months?   
    Clinical electives (especially after 2nd year) so you get used to the hospital environment. Gaining practice in examining patients and writing up assessments/notes will help you hit the ground running come clerkship.
    If you have an idea of what competitive program you wish to pursue, try to do some research or other work in the field. If you don't know which program to focus on yet after first year, use the summer to do some more career exploration to help you decide, and try to arrange research for the summer after 2nd year.
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Question for current radiology residents - semi urgent   
    My opinion is that a strong letter in medicine reflects well on you - however, if the letter may cause confusion about your career interests, it would be best to explicitly clarify in your personal statement that you were once considering internal medicine, but now have decided to focus on radiology.
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Radsinthefuture in Question for current radiology residents - semi urgent   
    My opinion is that a strong letter in medicine reflects well on you - however, if the letter may cause confusion about your career interests, it would be best to explicitly clarify in your personal statement that you were once considering internal medicine, but now have decided to focus on radiology.
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Calgary IM Personal Statement   
    Surely you must envision yourself learning and growing in some way during your residency??
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MDtingz in Drop out rate?   
    For longer-term career satisfaction, it's probably more relevant to think in terms of meaning rather than fun. It may or may not be thrilling to do that nth cholecystectomy on call , but it is meaningful and satisfying to use the skills you've trained years for in order to carry out a technically successful procedure for the patient who needs that immediate intervention. Similarly, it was probably not fun to study for the MCAT, but satisfying to receive that medical school acceptance, which made the process meaningful (and it is meaning, not fun, that is the greater contribution to happiness). Desire for change is quite person dependent, and for those who find change/improvements exciting, the medical field offers a limitless stream of new developments and ideas to influence one's practice.
  18. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from JohnGrisham in Maternity Leave/ Parental leave PARO   
    Yes, it's very common. I'd also note the maximum number of months that you can miss in residency and still complete on schedule, if that works for your household. Something like 3 months (check program requirements).
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from NutritionRunner in Are Residents in Canada Overworked and Underpaid?   
    Clerks are students, not employees (unlike residents who have dual status). The work that they do is basically hands-on training, and is supervised by residents and staff, who also see the patient, check the student's work, and are 100% responsible for any errors or omissions. 
    It's just an odd concept since I never really expected pay as a clerk - any stipend was a bonus, as there are other professions where students do unpaid practicums as part of their training. Of course, clerks aren't useless, and often they can spend the most time talking to patients which is very valuable. I was just curious what services wouldn't function properly without clerks (except perhaps when extra retractors are needed in the OR). Are there still many services where clerks do solo call without resident backup?
    Ref. House of God Law #11.
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to ACHQ in Are Residents in Canada Overworked and Underpaid?   
    Hahahahahah sorry I didn’t mean to be so harsh, but it is the reality of the situation. Some of the best medical students will be an asset to a team (an asset as much as a JMR can be). My point was that CTU won’t crumble in their absences.
    tbh I could care less if med students slow me down, but their job during their IM rotation is NOT to help make me more efficient (which they cannot do anyways), it’s to learn Internal medicine. I WANT my clerks learn something that they can carry with them forward regardless of what they eventually go into, even if it means we have to spend a little bit more time for it. 
    “CTU” is a constructed system to teach medical students and residents internal medicine. As people mentioned if we just wanted to provide patient care and peace out we could (like how weekend rounding works, although we’re on call and there the whole day ahah)
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Birdy in Income and Lifestyle   
    Yes, students who have worked in other careers prior to medicine often express a greater appreciation for the security and privilege it provides, compared to many other people who also work difficult hours in less desirable occupations for much less pay and job security.
  22. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from PT2MD in Income and Lifestyle   
    Yes, students who have worked in other careers prior to medicine often express a greater appreciation for the security and privilege it provides, compared to many other people who also work difficult hours in less desirable occupations for much less pay and job security.
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from marta12345 in Income and Lifestyle   
    Yes, students who have worked in other careers prior to medicine often express a greater appreciation for the security and privilege it provides, compared to many other people who also work difficult hours in less desirable occupations for much less pay and job security.
  24. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from F508 in Income and Lifestyle   
    Yes, students who have worked in other careers prior to medicine often express a greater appreciation for the security and privilege it provides, compared to many other people who also work difficult hours in less desirable occupations for much less pay and job security.
  25. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Reference Letters - should I help my referees write them, etc.   
    Only if they request your help with pointers on content. If they're a medical person and they haven't asked you to draft a letter, I wouldn't offer. Don't want to imply that they don't know how to write a good letter of reference. You want one that's personalized, anyhow. Do provide your CV, official instructions from the school, envelopes, etc. of course.
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