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Lactic Folly

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  1. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LiconC in Asking the same person to submit an LoR over and over and over...   
    Not much way around if it, if this is going to be one of your strongest letters. If it helps, most of the time and effort lies in writing the initial draft. It should take much less work afterwards if all they need to do is change the date and print out a new copy in subsequent years.
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from TheSalmonMousse in Papers that are not yet published?   
    You would specify that they have been accepted, in press (or submitted to xx Journal if there is no official manuscript decision yet).
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Tullius in How To Impress During An Radiology Observership   
    To start: http://www.svuhradiology.ie/

     

    For more:

    Demystifying Interventional Radiology: A Guide for Medical Students

    http://link.springer...8-3-319-17238-5

     

    Probably more than you need for an observership:

    Interventional Radiology: A Survival Guide (Kessel) and Learning Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Munoz)

     

    Since it's IR, it would also be helpful to know about sterile technique if you haven't been in the OR yet (i.e. where to stand and where to keep your hands).

  4. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from IMislove in When a resident tells you to go home?   
    Yeah, I guess the common theme here is that you should be working hard and looking for ways to contribute because that's part of who you are - a team player who's dedicated to becoming a better physician, not someone who's primarily interested in making a good impression for their evaluation. I don't know how well preceptors can tell true from fake enthusiasm; likely most prefer a smiling face to a long one, although attempts to outshine other students may rub the team the wrong way.
  5. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Arztin in When a resident tells you to go home?   
    Yeah, I guess the common theme here is that you should be working hard and looking for ways to contribute because that's part of who you are - a team player who's dedicated to becoming a better physician, not someone who's primarily interested in making a good impression for their evaluation. I don't know how well preceptors can tell true from fake enthusiasm; likely most prefer a smiling face to a long one, although attempts to outshine other students may rub the team the wrong way.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to Edict in Climate in Diagnostic Radiology   
    But i guess my argument is even the financial rewards may not pan out like you want them to. Generally speaking, once a specialty gets a good gig, people all rush towards that specialty or that practice setting and it becomes ultracompetitive and/or there are no jobs very quickly. 10 years down the line things laws change, tech changes and suddenly what was once well paying can become less well paying. At that point you could be left holding the bag. There certainly are people i'm sure who chased the income, by the time they are looking for the job after residency, the market is saturated, they can't find a good job and settle for some other practice setting, then the laws or tech readjust, that income potential disappears and they watch as friends in the specialty they considered but left behind make a killing because of some new law or tech that benefits them. An example is that family medicine used to not be a well paying specialty but that changed with the introduction of FHTs. There are certainly family doctors who got into the FHTs and are now making gold plating incomes for a lot less work. Another example of people chasing the "good gigs" is in IM subspecialties, cardiology and GI used to be very well paying procedural specialties, everyone went for them, they were ultracompetitive, then they got saturated. People then went for Nephro because running a dialysis unit was a good gig, that got saturated, people went for ICU, that got saturated, then people went for Rheum, Endo and Heme because there were jobs and now people are going for GIM because there are jobs. 
    For this reason i argue for doing something you are interested in (most people with enough shadowing and exposure can narrow things down to 2-3 specialties). The interest won't fade, the money might. 
     
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Calling other professions Dr?   
    I'm not familiar with this cultural view... anyone with a PhD is Dr. by title, as ZBL said. Have you had PhD anatomy (or other basic science) professors in the preclerkship portion of medical school? How did you address them? Maybe your university was different, but all our professors went by Dr.
    Although you probably don't mean to intentionally convey disrespect by using Mr/Ms, it could come across as suggesting that the title someone has earned through their PhD isn't valid simply because they're not in medicine like you are. Hence the frustration you are sensing. It may be worth clearing the air and apologizing if you can reasonably claim that you just found out she actually holds a PhD.
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MDtingz in Drop out rate?   
    For longer-term career satisfaction, it's probably more relevant to think in terms of meaning rather than fun. It may or may not be thrilling to do that nth cholecystectomy on call , but it is meaningful and satisfying to use the skills you've trained years for in order to carry out a technically successful procedure for the patient who needs that immediate intervention. Similarly, it was probably not fun to study for the MCAT, but satisfying to receive that medical school acceptance, which made the process meaningful (and it is meaning, not fun, that is the greater contribution to happiness). Desire for change is quite person dependent, and for those who find change/improvements exciting, the medical field offers a limitless stream of new developments and ideas to influence one's practice.
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to goleafsgochris in At each Canadian medical school, how many exams can you fail without having to repeat the year?   
    This is one of the bad things about PBL--its almost impossible to evaluate.  Some preceptors at Mac would zone out completely and give everyone basically the same eval.  But some would essentially evaluate based on how much you talk.  If youre in a group of ~8 students, you sometimes have to force yourself to say a bunch of bs that doesn't add anything just to increase the percentage of time you are talking.  Harder than you think if there are 5-6 extroverts in your group. Also it goes without saying, but talking more in no way correlates with how much you learn in a PBL setting.
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to ralk in sexual assault and "stigma" in med school apps   
    If you come across a relevant question where bringing up what you went through would be a meaningful part of honest and thorough answer, I'd say you shouldn't feel the need to shy away from telling this part of your personal journey towards a career in medicine. Especially considering the growth you've shown in response to it, I would be very surprised (and deeply disappointed) if it were in any way held against you.
    By the same token, however, don't feel that not talking about this part of your life is somehow deceptive towards interviewers. I'd go even further and suggest that you not go out of your way to disclose what you went through, not because I think it'll stigmatize you, but rather because doing so can land you into a bit of classic trap interviewees frequently fall into - drawing attention to aspects of your story important to you, rather than the aspects important to their interviewers. The key part of your story to sell is that you proactively took on an advocacy role and provided support for a group of victims. As an interviewer, while I do care about the motivation behind those actions, it's by far a secondary consideration - I would still think highly of what you've done if you hadn't been assaulted, even while acknowledging the strength it takes to turn such a negative experience into positive action.
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from BoardManGetsPaid in ..   
    Agree that you want coaches who will give you as much constructive feedback as possible. It's one thing to provide a confidence boost to someone who needs it, but most everyone starting out this in this process will have room for improvement. Did these coaches have a background in medical admissions? Are you near a university where you can access in-person coaching? Even family/friends may be helpful to pick up on body language cues, as they will be motivated to help you succeed.
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to ZBL in Internal Sub-specialties Salary   
    Usually more slack or slightly less hours, usually fewer patients per day, usually much less acuity/stress, usually group practices so vacation is a bit easier, usually minimal call, and more likely to be salaried positions through a university so less need to worry about billing. However, like every specialty, there’s a ton of variability in everything I just listed. Some earn more than FM, some earn less, some work more hours, some work less and same goes for FM. Truly the best way to see what they’re all like is to just get some clinical experience in these specialties and chat with residents/staff as the CMA data only goes so far (though I’d doubt you actually have clinical interest in all of them, as they’re pretty different). To that end, based on your recent posts about various specialties, I think your best bet is to do some soul searching as to what it is you really want in a specialty. There’s no shortage of specialties with good lifestyles, and really most specialties can be tailored to some extent to get you close to the lifestyle and salary you want (either scaled up or down), so I think rather than wondering about the average lifestyle/salary ratio for everything you should focus on what you actually want to be doing clinically with your time, then narrow in from that. 
  13. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from SunAndMoon in Cost of medical school as a factor in decision-making   
    Do you know if you want to do family or specialize?
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from thesupreme in ..   
    It's natural to have some of the same feelings as starting at a new high school, which may sound a bit surprising given that most people have completed undergrad +/- some work experience prior to starting medical school, but I'll leave it at that. There are some good reads out there about the difference between fitting in and belonging. By virtue of your acceptance, you now belong in this profession, and hopefully that knowledge will help release some of the anxiety about fitting in. Congratulations! Life may throw curveballs regardless, but the changes that are coming will be an amazing opportunity for growth that you've worked hard to achieve. 
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Distancea in U of T vs. MacMed   
    I just wanted to say that I appreciate the frankness of the above post, given that the author identifies as a Mac graduate. Seems that most if not all of the important factors have been covered in this thread.
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from beepboopbot in U of T vs. MacMed   
    I just wanted to say that I appreciate the frankness of the above post, given that the author identifies as a Mac graduate. Seems that most if not all of the important factors have been covered in this thread.
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Med Eye in U of T vs. MacMed   
    I just wanted to say that I appreciate the frankness of the above post, given that the author identifies as a Mac graduate. Seems that most if not all of the important factors have been covered in this thread.
  18. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Edict in U of T vs. MacMed   
    I just wanted to say that I appreciate the frankness of the above post, given that the author identifies as a Mac graduate. Seems that most if not all of the important factors have been covered in this thread.
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to Edict in U of T vs. MacMed   
    If you don't have a good reason already to go to McMaster, I would choose UofT.
    1. 3 vs 4 yr curriculum - Unless you are rushing to get out, a 4 year program gives you time to explore specialties. Do not underestimate how tough a 3 year program can be on your wellbeing, doing med school without breaks is not without challenges and sacrifices.
    2. Mixed vs PBL - UofT has the better curriculum especially since it has updated it to include some PBL, the Mac pre-clerkship is essentially do whatever you want, very little contact time and very little direction, you don't know what is important or not important to study, people just end up reading Toronto Notes for tutorials
    3. Toronto vs Hamilton - Up to you to decide, but I would argue most people would do better in Toronto. If undecided, pick the big city, it is easier to leave the big city than to leave and come back.
    4. Research - This is the one area both schools are excellent in. Toronto has more breadth, but may be more self directed and hard to navigate due to size. Hamilton is insane in certain areas like clin epi, weaker in others but it is very easy to get research in Hamilton, very little competition
    5. Surgery vs Non-surgery - I've heard people say UofT convinces you to specialize, just by virtue of exposure to all these super sub specialists. However, if you are thinking surgical specialty, Toronto has much more support for that, from strong anatomy teaching to skills labs to SEAD to a longer surgical clerkship.
    6. Where do you want to be for residency? - If the answer is Toronto, choose Toronto, if the answer is Hamilton, choose Hamilton, if the answer is other, it is basically the same, although i've heard rumors that it seems to be a little harder to convince other schools that you want to go there as a UofT student.
    7. Culture - This varies year to year, but generally speaking Mac has a friendly and collaborative class, people share resources and advice and there is a bit of a "we are all in this together vibe" which may or may not have something to do with being a 3 yr program in a 4 yr world. Toronto, from what I hear is a bit more competitive, close within each academy but people tend to do their own thing.
  20. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from plastics91 in U of Alberta vs. McMaster   
    There are established linkages between surgery and research in a broad range of fields including machine learning, probably more so than with emergency medicine in Canada if I had to guess, though I could be wrong on that. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27119951 
    A search reveals a scientist at McMaster who is doing research in machine learning and trains surgical residents/fellows in research. https://rhpcs.mcmaster.ca/who-we-are/ranil
    The McMaster Surgeon Scientist program has biotechnology/innovation as one of its areas of focus. https://fhs.mcmaster.ca/ssp/ 
    I provided links to UofT residency programs since you expressed an interest in returning to Toronto. There are Clinician Investigator Programs at other schools as well, which are designed for residents interested in research careers. Your undergraduate program will primarily serve to get you into the residency program of your choice. Some research during your MD years would help, but I don't know how much time you would have for learning additional subjects like math/comp sci during Mac's program. Your time would likely be better spent learning medicine and working on strengthening your application for highly competitive fields such as the ones you are considering. With summers off in Alberta, you could set up months-long research projects in Toronto if you wish.
    When I meant that research could be time consuming, I meant in general, not with reference to GIM in particular which should not be longer than pursuing research through other Royal College specialties. Again, it depends if you see yourself building a career as a clinician researcher (PI), or being a clinician who simply participates in some research. You would want support from your department to apply for grants, etc. more than simply going down in clinical hours and pay, although your group scheduling would need to accommodate that as well.
    Again, it's easier if you're working somewhere that already has dedicated research personnel to support these activities. That's why I am unsure of your emphasis on FM being able to set up shop anywhere, as you will want to be close to a university performing research in machine learning/AI if you are seriously pursuing this path. This will determine your practice location more than needing to work in a hospital ER. I don't have firsthand knowledge of the EM job market, but any hospital with an emergency department needs it to be staffed, and it's flexible for anyone with privileges to pick up ER shifts, as long as the hospital and ER group are willing. 
  21. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from plastics91 in U of Alberta vs. McMaster   
    Also, not sure what you mean by funding hinging on a hospital - both hospital-based EM and traditional fee-for-service clinic-based FM bill the government directly for their services. The emergency medicine physician holds hospital privileges, but provides services as an independent contractor, as does the FM physician. It's the surgical specialties which are more constrained by availability of hospital resources (in particular OR time).
  22. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from plastics91 in U of Alberta vs. McMaster   
    I differ on this somewhat. All the surgeons I have seen in academic centres do some research, whether it's medical education research, participating in multicentre trials, etc., and some publish quite a bit with the help of trainees. https://surgery.mcmaster.ca/research/ongoing-areas-of-research Of course, there is a significant difference between doing some research (mostly on one's own time while still maintaining a full clinical practice) and being a clinician researcher with protected time as above.
    Unless someone already has a strong background in the area of research they wish to pursue (e.g. MD/PhD), I think it is much easier to establish a research program (if someone is that serious about it) if there is some infrastructure. It is invaluable to have access to a training program such as the ones listed above, which would provide access to mentors and research resources, and pave the way to further fellowships and success in obtaining grants. Not impossible without these if one is sufficiently determined of course, but more uphill.
    FM(EM) is primarily clinical training. You could apply for a research-oriented FM residency, but the coursework may not be entirely relevant to your interests. You could approach computing science and engineering faculty on your own, but will you be able to convince them to devote their limited time and funding to collaborating with you? I am not sure that being a trailblazer in FM is enough of a selling point in itself, unless you are bringing something else to the table (whatever experience and connections you may have from your MSc).
    I suspect that as far as non-surgical options go, general internal medicine is likely the more hospitable specialty for these kinds of research interests. More common for academic GIM to be doing fellowships in areas such as clinical informatics, and carrying that on into future practice. But developing a successful research program is also a time-consuming endeavour. It depends on how serious you are about this, like choosing surgery as a career.
    When looking at specialties, I would focus less on the subject matter (because everything makes a difference to patient QoL and becomes more interesting the more you learn about it). Rather, I would focus more on the nature of the work itself. How important is it for you to work with your hands, and specifically in the OR? If you haven't read it, Brian Freeman's Ultimate Guide to Choosing a Medical Specialty is pretty good.
    I think that if being close to family is more important in the long run, and you can see yourself being satisfied working in family medicine in Toronto (as the +1 EM is also competitive - 60-something percent match rate in recent years), then go for Mac. If you need more time for specialty exploration, the 4 year program may be advantageous for that reason, but certainly students have matched well coming from Mac - you'll just need to hit the ground running.
    Often reading or talking to people in the field about their careers can be equally or more high-yield than observing, since those further along in their careers are familiar with the range of practices out there and can distill what's most relevant to specialty choice and career satisfaction, whereas although there is also no substitute for firsthand experience as a student, it is only a small slice of a particular practice rather than of the possibilities available in an entire field.
  23. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from plastics91 in U of Alberta vs. McMaster   
    It sounds like research is important to you. Do you hold a PhD, or currently work in AI research? If not, would you pursue a program such as https://surgery.utoronto.ca/surgeon-scientist-training-program or http://www.deptmedicine.utoronto.ca/eliot-phillipson-clinician-scientist-training-program ? Do you envision yourself a clinician scientist with a research program and a collaboration with computing science? The right infrastructure is invaluable for setting up a research career - I found a family medicine-based informatics fellowship in the US but not sure if similar opportunities exist in Canada. https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/departments/family-medicine/education/fellowships/clinical-informatics-fellowship
    How much time would you spend on research during the school year?
  24. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from plastics91 in U of Alberta vs. McMaster   
    Congrats! It is evident that you have done a fair amount of career exploration and reflection.
    Given this, the main outstanding question in my mind based on your post is - how far along are you in that decision?
    For example, if you are 90% for FM-EM, and can see yourself being able to decide on the 3-year program versus a 5-year specialty in fairly short order once commencing the medical program, then sure, it might be a 'waste' of the extra year as you put it.
    However, if you are more 50/50 at this point, then the extra year may be beneficial, especially as your shortlist essentially consists of the most competitive Royal College specialties. My understanding is that electives for fields such as ophth and derm can be challenging to obtain (they are sought after by FM students too), and deciding on a field early on will make it easier to book them.
    With regards to your career-related connections in Toronto, do you anticipate you would travel back and see people on weekdays? weekends? It's not clear to me whether the concern about distance is primarily a career or family- related consideration.
  25. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from happybee in Drop out rate?   
    For longer-term career satisfaction, it's probably more relevant to think in terms of meaning rather than fun. It may or may not be thrilling to do that nth cholecystectomy on call , but it is meaningful and satisfying to use the skills you've trained years for in order to carry out a technically successful procedure for the patient who needs that immediate intervention. Similarly, it was probably not fun to study for the MCAT, but satisfying to receive that medical school acceptance, which made the process meaningful (and it is meaning, not fun, that is the greater contribution to happiness). Desire for change is quite person dependent, and for those who find change/improvements exciting, the medical field offers a limitless stream of new developments and ideas to influence one's practice.
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