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Lactic Folly

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  1. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to TechToMD in Interesting Program Directors Take on CARMS   
    Coming from a 3 year program, I would be in favour of a standardized exam. I'm going for a fairly competitive surgical specialty, and the lack of ability to show programs any kind of objective measure of my aptitude makes it really hard to gauge my chances in any way. The only viable way they have of testing us is by seeing us on elective, but we can't do electives everywhere. I would like it to be more like the US where we do a standardized test that gives an objective score to work off of, and lets applicants measure for ourselves how competitive we'd be for a certain specialty.
    If there is an objective measure to work off, stronger candidates could even start using some of their precious electives as what they are meant for: to explore different areas of medicine that they may not get further training in but might come in handy in the future (for example, as a -hopefully- future surgeon I'd like to do an elective in family medicine to see what it's like for patients and the GP's perspective in referral which I can use to write better dictations in the future knowing what GP's like to see).
    I'd argue this could even bring in more well rounded residents into a program and help people make more informed decisions about where they would be happy specialty-wise. Lots of advantages here, but of course the question returns to the validity of the test being used. I agree that USMLE is not a great test for our model, something that suits our medical school curriculum and is more clinically oriented would be better. And of course, 3 year schools would have to make adjustments as necessary but I don't think that's impossible nor is it a bad thing.
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Butterfly_ in use of a mentor   
    If you don't have any further questions at this point, you could just email a nice thank-you for the advice given so far. This would keep the door open if you wish to contact him again in the future.
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MDLaval in radiology electives   
    At a school that gives more weight to elective performance, it would be better to have people really pull for you at the pre-interview stage if they were really impressed by your performance during the elective (i.e. knowledgeable with strong interpersonal skills). This would help you be ranked highly - the above applicant sounds rather forgettable and it's not clear how they would rank in the end, unless they really blow the interviewers away or have an impressive CV.
    If someone offers you a case to write up, take the opportunity. As you've noted, many electives are rather observational in nature otherwise.
    There have been previous threads of advice on this topic in this forum that should be retrievable via search.
     
  4. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to cleanup in -   
    You've got the world at your feet. A little too much selection. It means you're incredibly talented, intelligent, hard-working.
    You've said lifestyle is huge, so let's look at things from that perspective. That basically encompasses income, hours, length of training, possibility for passive income, and possibly most importantly, stress & health aspects. I would assume you're basically coming at it from the perspective of "I don't want to spend too long in school, but I want to make a good living without working myself to the bone."
    All of this is just my opinion, anyone can feel free to disagree
    Dentistry
    Pros
    General dentistry has a much shorter length of training than any medical specialty, even family In the same vein, if you are in general dentistry, there is rarely a requirement for you to do a residency The top-earning dentists most likely out-earn the top-earning physicians You are likely to have much more flexibility over your hours, regardless of whether you are a practice owner or an associate You also have more control over the types of patients you see and the types of procedures you perform Passive income is more prevalent in dentistry than it is in medicine, it is more common to earn a living without doing clinical work; this depends on your personality really Depending on the field of medicine you're in or the types of patients you deal with, very rarely are you dealing with emergent, life or death, or extreme QOL-altering situations. Not that dental and oral issues are not impactful, but the ceiling is lower Cons
    Dental school itself is, in my opinion, more of an arduous experience than medical school (before residency) The lowest-earning dentists likely earn far less than the lowest-earning physicians, and on average, dentists likely earn less than physicians as a whole Ownership in dentistry is often the avenue to high income, unless you are a specialist; with some exceptions, there is a ceiling to how much you can make as an associate Dentistry is competitive in urban areas; you may find yourself pushed to move away, practice far away, or otherwise leave urban areas that you may otherwise be able to easily/comfortably practice in as a physician Passive income, though nice, comes with its own headaches. Practice ownership in dentistry is far more onerous than in medicine. Overhead is very high, the complexity of equipment & resources you need is significant, and many different types of staff are necessary Dentists are the subject of litigation at a lower threshold compared to family physicians; often the risk of being sued or threatened operates with a hair trigger If you don't like teeth, or don't like the manner in which the public views/approaches dentists, this can be a risk factor for burn out & compassion fatigue. Clinical dentistry is difficult on the body. Physical burn-out is just as likely as mental burn-out. Medicine
    Pros
    Medical school is a tight-knit, fun experience. In my opinion medical students have much more support and intra-professional resources than dental students do You've got way, way more selection with respect to fields, disciplines, what you might be interested in. Don't underestimate this with respect to your lifestyle as liking what you do and the field you're in is paramount to avoiding compassion fatigue When you are first out of school you are likely to earn just as much as, if not more than, the average fresh-out-of-school general dentist. You may also do this on a lighter workload (fewer clinical hours per week) It's not as necessary as in dentistry to participate in practice ownership to earn a certain level of income, due to the possibility of higher, more rapid billables. This is of course field & location dependent, but I would say the level of ownership is likely lower due to it being less appealing overall with respect to income & autonomy compared to dentistry You may enjoy higher levels of respect from the public; people come to both for help, but overall I would say dread going to the dentist more. This is a case of "I need to go see my doctor" vs. "I have to go see my dentist". It's subtle, but a consideration. How people deal with this is highly dependent on personality, but I can see it weighing on my colleagues differently. Family medicine is far less physically strenuous than general dentistry You'll never know what walks through the door! Heck, you might even get dental issues. Cons
    Length of training. Residency is tough. Earning low income during your residency years can be a grind, especially as those around you are jumpstarting their careers. It pays off, but once again it's a comfort level thing. You may not have as much flexibility with respect to hours compared to a general dentist. There may be a lower ceiling to income compared to a general dentist who is very business minded. The variability is lower. You may have to deal with emergent, life or death, extreme QOL-altering situations. This can be mentally and emotionally exhausting. You're more at the mercy of government legislation, health policy and tax issues than dentistry. Holy poo that's a lot of paperwork.  
    Anyone can feel free to correct me on anything.
    I'm very happy as a fresh-out-of-school DDS, earn a comfortable income, but it has its drawbacks. I also see that without specialization or practice ownership, there is a definite ceiling to income mandated by physical limitations (it's just too hard and exhausting to work more than I do right now). I'd say if you compared a family physician 2 years out of school compared to me, they may not make more overall, but likely make more per hour, and aren't as physically stressed as I am. 
    OP, it's a tough choice, but overall you should feel lucky that you have such immense opportunity available to you. I'm sure you'll be comfortable and happy no matter what you decide to do. :)
     
  5. Thanks
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from brady23 in Why or why not internal medicine?   
    What you wrote sounds more like the clerkship/resident experience of IM... which I liked, but I found that I could focus more on the enjoyable aspects of thinking/problem solving, discussing cases with colleagues, and doing occasional procedures in other fields without having to deal with as much documentation/paperwork and other challenges such as family dynamics in inpatient medicine.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from GrouchoMarx in The Perfect Clerk   
    The danger with always being careful not to show up anyone else is that you may receive evaluations stating that you need to read more, lack confidence, etc.
    Rather than pretending that you don't know, it may be better to say that you were just taught that info by someone else, came across it in your reading around a patient, etc.
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from medcan15 in radiology electives   
    At a school that gives more weight to elective performance, it would be better to have people really pull for you at the pre-interview stage if they were really impressed by your performance during the elective (i.e. knowledgeable with strong interpersonal skills). This would help you be ranked highly - the above applicant sounds rather forgettable and it's not clear how they would rank in the end, unless they really blow the interviewers away or have an impressive CV.
    If someone offers you a case to write up, take the opportunity. As you've noted, many electives are rather observational in nature otherwise.
    There have been previous threads of advice on this topic in this forum that should be retrievable via search.
     
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from excelspreadsheet in Is it okay to be reserved in an interview?   
    Of course, it's perfectly fine to be reserved/calm. But that is different from coming across as bored and distant, which has an unfriendly connotation to it. Given such feedback, I'd recommend videotaping yourself for a better self-assessment. You don't have to be brimming with enthusiasm and telling jokes to come as more friendly - just smiling more and leaning forward will help convey more warmth, as will employing more verbal social graces. Hopefully you performed better than you thought, and it's not an issue.
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Premedstudent0307 in Getting jumped at Queen’s for being Asian   
    Lots of immigration to Edmonton and Calgary in the past when economy was booming = more diverse, populous cities.
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Eudaimonia in Need help pertaining to school choices and residency chances   
    Edict probably means that even though you might see fewer people matching OOP in a given instance, it doesn't mean that there is necessarily an advantage given to in-province applicants - it just reflects the preferences of the applicants who are attending medical school in their home region.
    Agree that the only differences would likely be the ability to make in-depth connections at Queen's, and perhaps a shorter distance to travel for electives at the other Ontario centres. But if you don't have an issue doing Ontario electives while being based at Dal, I don't think it will make a significant difference. Programs still want the best fit regardless of where you have trained.
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from targaryen in Calling other professions Dr?   
    Seems to be some lack of clarity regarding what scenarios "in the clinical setting" refers to in this thread, which has bearing on the discussion.
    1) Health care professional working with a patient: Agree that clarity to the patient is important. Medical trainees would not be responsible for introducing others on the health care team to the patient though, so I don't see this becoming an issue for the typical student or resident. Everyone has name tags in the hospital, and would be expected to clarify their role when introducing themselves to patients - similar to a resident who may call themselves Dr. but should mention that they are a resident. It should be noted that just because an allied health PhD prefers to be addressed formally by medical trainees, in my mind it does not mean that they would necessarily introduce themselves as Dr. to patients. If anyone has recent experiences with this, please share - in the hospital, I mainly see nurse practitioners which are master's level allied health, and not PhD.
    2) Referring to other health care professionals when they are not present: [first name last name] sans title usually works for nearly everyone in the hospital if you don't wish to be overly hierarchical. I do agree that others might expect to hear students/residents refer to their attendings as Dr. 
    3) Addressing others directly (whether it be on the ward in rounds, in the team room, etc.): I believe this was OP's scenario. A medical trainee can decline to address other full members of the health care team by their preferred title, but it's probably not a politically astute move (360 degree evals and all). It's not much different from addressing a patient as Dr. if you knew they had a doctorate. To pass pediatrics OSCE, we had to specifically address the pediatric patient's parents by their proper name ('Mom' or 'Dad' was not acceptable).
    When you're not in the presence of the patient, I'm not sure how scope of practice is relevant (and it doesn't do much good for a physician to provide a prescription if the patient can't afford to fill the script or has no place to stay on discharge). If I were the attending physician and noticed that my learners felt uncomfortable calling my PhD colleagues by their proper titles (out of some sense they should not seek to feel 'more special' when in the hospital, not out of a desire to avoid confusion away from the patient's bedside), to be frank I wouldn't think it reflected well on them. As noted above, a doctoral-level PhD is a higher academic degree than MD, which is an undergraduate-level professional degree. Just my opinion.
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from NutritionRunner in Calling other professions Dr?   
    Seems to be some lack of clarity regarding what scenarios "in the clinical setting" refers to in this thread, which has bearing on the discussion.
    1) Health care professional working with a patient: Agree that clarity to the patient is important. Medical trainees would not be responsible for introducing others on the health care team to the patient though, so I don't see this becoming an issue for the typical student or resident. Everyone has name tags in the hospital, and would be expected to clarify their role when introducing themselves to patients - similar to a resident who may call themselves Dr. but should mention that they are a resident. It should be noted that just because an allied health PhD prefers to be addressed formally by medical trainees, in my mind it does not mean that they would necessarily introduce themselves as Dr. to patients. If anyone has recent experiences with this, please share - in the hospital, I mainly see nurse practitioners which are master's level allied health, and not PhD.
    2) Referring to other health care professionals when they are not present: [first name last name] sans title usually works for nearly everyone in the hospital if you don't wish to be overly hierarchical. I do agree that others might expect to hear students/residents refer to their attendings as Dr. 
    3) Addressing others directly (whether it be on the ward in rounds, in the team room, etc.): I believe this was OP's scenario. A medical trainee can decline to address other full members of the health care team by their preferred title, but it's probably not a politically astute move (360 degree evals and all). It's not much different from addressing a patient as Dr. if you knew they had a doctorate. To pass pediatrics OSCE, we had to specifically address the pediatric patient's parents by their proper name ('Mom' or 'Dad' was not acceptable).
    When you're not in the presence of the patient, I'm not sure how scope of practice is relevant (and it doesn't do much good for a physician to provide a prescription if the patient can't afford to fill the script or has no place to stay on discharge). If I were the attending physician and noticed that my learners felt uncomfortable calling my PhD colleagues by their proper titles (out of some sense they should not seek to feel 'more special' when in the hospital, not out of a desire to avoid confusion away from the patient's bedside), to be frank I wouldn't think it reflected well on them. As noted above, a doctoral-level PhD is a higher academic degree than MD, which is an undergraduate-level professional degree. Just my opinion.
  13. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Calling other professions Dr?   
    I'm not familiar with this cultural view... anyone with a PhD is Dr. by title, as ZBL said. Have you had PhD anatomy (or other basic science) professors in the preclerkship portion of medical school? How did you address them? Maybe your university was different, but all our professors went by Dr.
    Although you probably don't mean to intentionally convey disrespect by using Mr/Ms, it could come across as suggesting that the title someone has earned through their PhD isn't valid simply because they're not in medicine like you are. Hence the frustration you are sensing. It may be worth clearing the air and apologizing if you can reasonably claim that you just found out she actually holds a PhD.
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to goleafsgochris in Is there such thing as "too many" electives in a non-competitive specialty?   
    Totally agree.  This is what I was talking about above.  "Exploring specialties" is the official line your med school will give you, but everyone knows that's not realistic at all anymore.  You should be exploring specialties in your 1st year or 2 (prior to your electives starting), by doing informal shadowing etc.  In no way should you be spending your formal electives doing this if you want to maximize your chance at a specialty.  
    TBH the people that use electives to "explore specialties" all end up in family medicine (often by choice).
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from NutritionRunner in Calling other professions Dr?   
    I'm not familiar with this cultural view... anyone with a PhD is Dr. by title, as ZBL said. Have you had PhD anatomy (or other basic science) professors in the preclerkship portion of medical school? How did you address them? Maybe your university was different, but all our professors went by Dr.
    Although you probably don't mean to intentionally convey disrespect by using Mr/Ms, it could come across as suggesting that the title someone has earned through their PhD isn't valid simply because they're not in medicine like you are. Hence the frustration you are sensing. It may be worth clearing the air and apologizing if you can reasonably claim that you just found out she actually holds a PhD.
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from NeuroD in Calling other professions Dr?   
    I'm not familiar with this cultural view... anyone with a PhD is Dr. by title, as ZBL said. Have you had PhD anatomy (or other basic science) professors in the preclerkship portion of medical school? How did you address them? Maybe your university was different, but all our professors went by Dr.
    Although you probably don't mean to intentionally convey disrespect by using Mr/Ms, it could come across as suggesting that the title someone has earned through their PhD isn't valid simply because they're not in medicine like you are. Hence the frustration you are sensing. It may be worth clearing the air and apologizing if you can reasonably claim that you just found out she actually holds a PhD.
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from PharmaLife in Calling other professions Dr?   
    I'm not familiar with this cultural view... anyone with a PhD is Dr. by title, as ZBL said. Have you had PhD anatomy (or other basic science) professors in the preclerkship portion of medical school? How did you address them? Maybe your university was different, but all our professors went by Dr.
    Although you probably don't mean to intentionally convey disrespect by using Mr/Ms, it could come across as suggesting that the title someone has earned through their PhD isn't valid simply because they're not in medicine like you are. Hence the frustration you are sensing. It may be worth clearing the air and apologizing if you can reasonably claim that you just found out she actually holds a PhD.
  18. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Distancea in Things NOT to do as an interviewee (Interviewer perspectives welcome!)   
    Although as you said, I would suggest refraining from making any reference to an interviewer's ethnicity or accent in the future, if he had been offended, he would probably not have smiled in response IMO.
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to indefatigable in Myers-Briggs Personality Type and Medical Specialities   
    This is really important.  When I've done the test myself, I've received answers giving various personality types, but I recently tried a predictive tool based on social media analysis - and it gave a completely different type of personality (despite the name of the link - it's affiliated with Cambridge.  As a bonus it does an analysis of the big 5 types as well):
    https://applymagicsauce.com
    I think different aspects of personality can come into conflict with themselves - i.e. more thinking/judging vs sensing/feeling.. etc. 
    However, I do know all aspects of my personality currently believe that doing med school in a 2nd language, without full linguistic ability, was possibly an error, as the personal/psychological/emotional price has been too high and the thinking/judging believes that I'll never be able to reach my own potential in terms of performance and thus be permanently frustrated.  This is with the full realization that med school may never have happened and that upon admission I had no real indication that 2nd language can be such a barrier to excelling.
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MDLaval in Dating Profiles   
    A nanny in addition to a stay-at-home spouse?
    You could live like this, but you wouldn't be able to retire for a long time, which may or may not bother them, haha.
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Mustang92 in Myers-Briggs Personality Type and Medical Specialities   
    Of course, no system is perfect, and there is a book by Annie Murphy Paul that makes an argument for discrediting the use of such tests. But a brief online test may not convey enough of the nuances - that there is no value judgment in any of the modes. Both Thinking and Feeling preferences can be equally "caring" - it is not about intentions, but rather the preferred method in which decisions are made.
    I attended a leadership session in which two groups, one of T participants and the other of F participants, were each asked to solve the same problem. It brought to light the very different approaches the two groups had, and offered insight into how an emphasis on people's personal situations could be misconstrued as favoritism/unfairness by others, while a lack of attention to those personal factors could be seen as less caring/accommodating. Yet each group was trying to find the optimal solution to the problem in their own way. 
    This then, is what I see as the main utility to learning about these theories - not in a deterministic "this is the career for you" sort of way, but to know that these dimensions can exist and lead people to see the world in different, but equally valid, ways.
  22. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from End Poverty in Myers-Briggs Personality Type and Medical Specialities   
    INTJ (a preponderance of I types on this message board, perhaps not surprising?). Although the above list of specialties is not necessarily the be-all and end-all of career choice, I do find the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator a fascinating and useful framework for better understanding ourselves and the people around us. It gives us a vocabulary for the spectrum of how people prefer to communicate and approach decisions, letting us ascribe to them to preferences which we can work to tailor our interactions towards, rather than labelling someone for their differences.
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LostLamb in Dating Profiles   
    A nanny in addition to a stay-at-home spouse?
    You could live like this, but you wouldn't be able to retire for a long time, which may or may not bother them, haha.
  24. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from End Poverty in Dating Profiles   
    A nanny in addition to a stay-at-home spouse?
    You could live like this, but you wouldn't be able to retire for a long time, which may or may not bother them, haha.
  25. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from NeuroD in How bad is it if I forgot to shake their hands at the end?   
    Don't read too much into what the interviewers are doing... they are not the ones being interviewed, so they won't be paying as much attention to how they are coming across. I doubt there is any correlation between the amount of writing and their thoughts about you. If you felt your answers were fine, then I would not overthink too much...
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