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Hanmari

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Hanmari last won the day on September 16 2018

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About Hanmari

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  1. "opportunistic and poorly informed" were the words they used lol Parasites.
  2. The traditional hearsay is that ophthalmology is the only competitive specialty where doing this actually helps you match.
  3. You still pay tuition in residency, it's some hundreds of dollars per year. CPSO fee is $345 per year for residents and there is a one-time fee for the application to get your CPSO license. CMPA fees do get charged but if you're in Ontario, the gov't will reimburse 90% of it. PARO website has a guide for starting residency: https://myparo.ca/starting-residency/ I think doing what ellorie did takes financial discipline. If you're living by yourself in one of the big cities you may find it difficult to save any money for the first few years unless you have lots of tax credits. The uppe
  4. For some reason U of T has that rep, but even within U of T the majority aren't gunning for competitive specialties and are just fine regular students. And the gunners don't really openly compete either, it's not the Olympics.
  5. Was looking through the quarantine requirements and found these clauses under the exemption section: Does this mean medical students/doctors are exempt from quarantine requirements upon entry? For some reason I was always under the impression we are not exempt. Full text here, exception list is section 6: https://orders-in-council.canada.ca/attachment.php?attach=39482&lang=en
  6. Maybe if you shadow another 15 ophthals you'll find that a couple of them absolutely despise glass blowing and would never match anyone who goes near glass blowing into their specialty
  7. @gogogo Thank you for that post, my friend. Whether it is the whole picture or a rosy two-thirds is unimportant to me, you've just given me strength to work tomorrow. I'm not kidding or being sarcastic. Thanks.
  8. Mm. Tricky. My knee jerk thought is that you could apply and, if and only if asked in the interview, say that the longer completion time was due to a medical/personal concern. You do not have any obligation to reveal any personal health information. And If they don't ask, don't bring it up. AFAIK you should not be disadvantaged in the selection process for the 2yr schools just because of the # of years it took for you to complete the degree. Could be wrong on that one.
  9. We've got a bunch of new staff on the forum now so hopefully this is relevant to you also. I was wondering out of curiosity, how much time does it take to do your CME credits? I just signed up for the resident Mainpro Mainport... thing where you can log credits in advance (wish I'd found out about this earlier...) and it made me wonder. What are the most efficient ways to meet the requirements? Are there also other things that you need in order to keep your license/If you just meet your CME quota each cycle will your license stay active regardless of the clinical workload, or will the col
  10. I think you'll get a heavily negative bias by asking residents
  11. Thanks, that makes sense. I guess it is reassuring in a way that there is nothing special to be done. Takes too much to do things on top to prevent burnout. It is an inevitable leak but it is comforting to know that when it bottoms out one can still run on empty and let the days pass.
  12. How did you keep going when you hit the wall? Was there something you did in preparation ahead of time that facilitated the (partial) recovery? And how are you and your colleagues dealing with the unprecedented stress around the royal college fiasco? I am now heading into PGY4 and whereas I don't feel I've hit it yet, I am wary it's only uphill from here.
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