Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Hanmari

Members
  • Content Count

    359
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from Understandable in Learning Nothing in Clerkship   
    All of medical education is a tug of war between learning and exploitation that synthesizes into a steady deterioration of everything, punctuated by replenishments that become fewer and further between. And that is not okay, but it is not the hill you want to die on. Expect nothing from the system and look at the daily work in terms of its utility - will it help you match? Is it actually good learning? At rare times it actually is. And sometimes you may want to show initiative to make good impressions even if it isn't. But if you decide it is truly useless, do not hesitate to claw back as much time and energy as you can from the system and put it to your own use. Take frequent breaks, refuse to do procedures, call in sick within the limits afforded by your school. Bear in mind the potential consequences of doing such things and balance those risks with the benefits of having more free time. Play the tug of war right, and you can get through the hoops with less burnout. 
  2. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from Pakoon in Can you avoid certain preceptors in clerkship?   
    Weeeeell... I mean, clerks are trying to make good impressions so they can get ref letters and match, so if they didn't mesh so well with a preceptor then I say it's reasonable to consider avoiding them if possible to maximize one's chances. I agree learning to work with incompatible personalities is a valuable skill to have, but I wouldn't have put it above maximizing the chance of match. We all know there are no shortages of difficult people we can learn to work with in residency, at an arguably lesser cost. 
     
    I like this approach, OP. Package things as maximizing the positives instead of avoiding the negatives, and the system will frown less upon you.
  3. Like
    Hanmari reacted to mdlifecrisis in Worried about getting reference letters   
    You can ask for reference letters retrospectively, just shoot them an e-mail (just remind them of who you are: send them your eval, a small summary of some of the things you did during the rotation, CV, photo)!
    Don't stress about it too much, most of us our average, that's actually how "average" works. 
     
  4. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from takasugi in Can you avoid certain preceptors in clerkship?   
    Weeeeell... I mean, clerks are trying to make good impressions so they can get ref letters and match, so if they didn't mesh so well with a preceptor then I say it's reasonable to consider avoiding them if possible to maximize one's chances. I agree learning to work with incompatible personalities is a valuable skill to have, but I wouldn't have put it above maximizing the chance of match. We all know there are no shortages of difficult people we can learn to work with in residency, at an arguably lesser cost. 
     
    I like this approach, OP. Package things as maximizing the positives instead of avoiding the negatives, and the system will frown less upon you.
  5. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from Findanus in Can you avoid certain preceptors in clerkship?   
    Weeeeell... I mean, clerks are trying to make good impressions so they can get ref letters and match, so if they didn't mesh so well with a preceptor then I say it's reasonable to consider avoiding them if possible to maximize one's chances. I agree learning to work with incompatible personalities is a valuable skill to have, but I wouldn't have put it above maximizing the chance of match. We all know there are no shortages of difficult people we can learn to work with in residency, at an arguably lesser cost. 
     
    I like this approach, OP. Package things as maximizing the positives instead of avoiding the negatives, and the system will frown less upon you.
  6. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from medmedmed132 in Learning Nothing in Clerkship   
    All of medical education is a tug of war between learning and exploitation that synthesizes into a steady deterioration of everything, punctuated by replenishments that become fewer and further between. And that is not okay, but it is not the hill you want to die on. Expect nothing from the system and look at the daily work in terms of its utility - will it help you match? Is it actually good learning? At rare times it actually is. And sometimes you may want to show initiative to make good impressions even if it isn't. But if you decide it is truly useless, do not hesitate to claw back as much time and energy as you can from the system and put it to your own use. Take frequent breaks, refuse to do procedures, call in sick within the limits afforded by your school. Bear in mind the potential consequences of doing such things and balance those risks with the benefits of having more free time. Play the tug of war right, and you can get through the hoops with less burnout. 
  7. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from zoxy in Learning Nothing in Clerkship   
    All of medical education is a tug of war between learning and exploitation that synthesizes into a steady deterioration of everything, punctuated by replenishments that become fewer and further between. And that is not okay, but it is not the hill you want to die on. Expect nothing from the system and look at the daily work in terms of its utility - will it help you match? Is it actually good learning? At rare times it actually is. And sometimes you may want to show initiative to make good impressions even if it isn't. But if you decide it is truly useless, do not hesitate to claw back as much time and energy as you can from the system and put it to your own use. Take frequent breaks, refuse to do procedures, call in sick within the limits afforded by your school. Bear in mind the potential consequences of doing such things and balance those risks with the benefits of having more free time. Play the tug of war right, and you can get through the hoops with less burnout. 
  8. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from dooogs in Learning Nothing in Clerkship   
    All of medical education is a tug of war between learning and exploitation that synthesizes into a steady deterioration of everything, punctuated by replenishments that become fewer and further between. And that is not okay, but it is not the hill you want to die on. Expect nothing from the system and look at the daily work in terms of its utility - will it help you match? Is it actually good learning? At rare times it actually is. And sometimes you may want to show initiative to make good impressions even if it isn't. But if you decide it is truly useless, do not hesitate to claw back as much time and energy as you can from the system and put it to your own use. Take frequent breaks, refuse to do procedures, call in sick within the limits afforded by your school. Bear in mind the potential consequences of doing such things and balance those risks with the benefits of having more free time. Play the tug of war right, and you can get through the hoops with less burnout. 
  9. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from DrOtter in LMCC 2 Results   
    "opportunistic and poorly informed" were the words they used lol
    Parasites.
  10. Like
  11. Haha
    Hanmari got a reaction from DrOtter in Is medical school environment in Canada competitive? or does it depend on school?   
    For some reason U of T has that rep, but even within U of T the majority aren't gunning for competitive specialties and are just fine regular students. And the gunners don't really openly compete either, it's not the Olympics.
  12. Haha
    Hanmari got a reaction from Mathmaximum in Is medical school environment in Canada competitive? or does it depend on school?   
    For some reason U of T has that rep, but even within U of T the majority aren't gunning for competitive specialties and are just fine regular students. And the gunners don't really openly compete either, it's not the Olympics.
  13. Haha
    Hanmari got a reaction from petitmonstre111 in Is medical school environment in Canada competitive? or does it depend on school?   
    For some reason U of T has that rep, but even within U of T the majority aren't gunning for competitive specialties and are just fine regular students. And the gunners don't really openly compete either, it's not the Olympics.
  14. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from procrastinating in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    I wish I'd picked a hobby and made it second nature. It's tough to develop new hobbies or broaden your horizons once you're a cog in the system. I'd have picked a single long-term interest and really delved into it, like take classes it in or something. To the point where it becomes effortless to do it in everyday life because that is the only way it won't shrivel up from the nuclear fallout of medicine.
    It's tough to spend any time on hobbies even when you're in med school, med school is time-consuming and difficult. So is every stage after this until retirement. There is never a good time to start. All you can do is start cutting out the tiniest bits of time you can find and throw it at something you care about in a meaningful way that will build up and make that hobby easier to do over time. If you already started in undergrad, good on you, keep it alive.
    And if you can't even find that little amount of time, that's alright. Lots of people can't. But pay attention to that fact. Really be aware each step of the way that you are giving up precious things for medicine and importantly, come to terms with that. You might still regret it but you will regret it less than if you had gunned obliviously. And god forbid if you get hit with a terminal illness before you reach whatever goal you've planned, at least you'll know what you gambled on was by choice and you might be able to go down laughing.
  15. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from Tullius in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    I wish I'd picked a hobby and made it second nature. It's tough to develop new hobbies or broaden your horizons once you're a cog in the system. I'd have picked a single long-term interest and really delved into it, like take classes it in or something. To the point where it becomes effortless to do it in everyday life because that is the only way it won't shrivel up from the nuclear fallout of medicine.
    It's tough to spend any time on hobbies even when you're in med school, med school is time-consuming and difficult. So is every stage after this until retirement. There is never a good time to start. All you can do is start cutting out the tiniest bits of time you can find and throw it at something you care about in a meaningful way that will build up and make that hobby easier to do over time. If you already started in undergrad, good on you, keep it alive.
    And if you can't even find that little amount of time, that's alright. Lots of people can't. But pay attention to that fact. Really be aware each step of the way that you are giving up precious things for medicine and importantly, come to terms with that. You might still regret it but you will regret it less than if you had gunned obliviously. And god forbid if you get hit with a terminal illness before you reach whatever goal you've planned, at least you'll know what you gambled on was by choice and you might be able to go down laughing.
  16. Haha
    Hanmari got a reaction from Ms_Sunshine in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    I think you'll get a heavily negative bias by asking residents
  17. Haha
    Hanmari got a reaction from Medddddd in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    I think you'll get a heavily negative bias by asking residents
  18. Like
    Hanmari got a reaction from gogogo in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    @gogogo
    Thank you for that post, my friend. Whether it is the whole picture or a rosy two-thirds is unimportant to me, you've just given me strength to work tomorrow. I'm not kidding or being sarcastic. Thanks.
  19. Thanks
    Hanmari reacted to gogogo in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    I didn't say non-physicians need a PhD to earn a lot. I was talking specifically about tech and brought up the example of data science, which is one of the hottest jobs in tech right now. Many of the people in data science have a PhD, meaning they have almost just as much training as a family doctor, but are earning half of what the average family doctor does. And that's just family medicine, which is one of the lower paid specialties (on average). The cardiologists, ophthalmologists, etc. making 500k+ are making a salary that you won't touch in tech/corporate unless you're the very best of the best and have decades of experience (or are in Silicon Valley, which again, is rare, can come with long hours too, and is usually a short-term option for Canadian tech grads who eventually move back to Canada and take a huge paycut).
    Here are the notable jobs in our society that make 250k+ (I'm not including insanely rare jobs, like professional athlete, artist, etc.):
    1. Partner at a professional firm (e.g., law, accounting)
    2. Corporate executive 
    3. High up at a consulting firm/investment banking
    4. Independent business owner/founder
    All of the jobs above usually require just as many hours as medicine, if not more. Consultants, for example, are in a different city *every week* from Monday to Thursday. One consultant I spoke to was married and had to take a project in Sweden, meaning he wouldn't see his wife for 6 months. People in IB are basically working nonstop everyday (100 hours a week is typical). The same for law firm partners. And being an independent business founder/owner is so rare that it's probably not worth discussing. Also remember that these jobs are not guaranteed like in medicine. There's no guarantee you'll become partner at a law firm, for example. In medicine, once you're in, you have the job for life.
    If you choose a lifestyle specialty (e.g., family medicine, endocrinology), you will make a salary that the people in the above jobs are working a minimum of 60 hours a week to achieve. Except they also have the risk of being fired any time, losing their job during a recession, have to travel for corporate events, etc. For instance, a friend who was making 150k in investment banking 2 years after undergrad seemed to have it all. The bank was even paying for her taxis to drive her home at night. But then I realized that she was working every day from 7am to 1am. And that's for 150k, a salary you could easily double as a family doctor working on your own terms. The level of autonomy, stability, and salary for the hours worked in medicine is not easily replicated in other industries.
    If you are working resident hours as staff,  you are doing it because you chose a specialty with those hours, and you are being compensated nicely for it. For instance, the cardiologists working insane hours are making 500-600k. That would take beating a lot of competition in corporate after 1-2 decades just to get there. It's not any easier. 
    As for debt, unless you're bad with money, you can pay off medical school debt within 5 years of practice. There are also scholarships during med school that can offset costs, as well as the tuition tax breaks I mentioned above. Finally, again, it's not like people in other industries don't have debt. MBA and law school costs ~100k.
  20. Haha
    Hanmari reacted to LittleFrog in MD Class of 2024 bag colour   
    All these comments are so out of touch. There is a large majority of students who haven't been able to get into medical school and seeing so many people complain about the colour of a backpack is very careless. Be grateful for the position you are in, and don't complain about something many students would give anything to have. No one is forcing you to wear it. 
  21. Haha
    Hanmari got a reaction from Fast_Layne in MD Class of 2024 bag colour   
    I remember we pylons desperately tried to vote pink as the colour after our year because we were so bitter.
    I never used mine at all and gave it away to my dad who does a fair amount of hiking. I told him it'd help the rescuers see him if he ever gets stranded.
  22. Thanks
    Hanmari got a reaction from Fxckedprobably in 8 years to complete undergraduate degree   
    Mm. Tricky. My knee jerk thought is that you could apply and, if and only if asked in the interview, say that the longer completion time was due to a medical/personal concern. You do not have any obligation to reveal any personal health information. And If they don't ask, don't bring it up. AFAIK you should not be disadvantaged in the selection process for the 2yr schools just because of the # of years it took for you to complete the degree. Could be wrong on that one.
  23. Like
    Hanmari reacted to LostLamb in Happy last day of residency to everybody finishing!!!   
    Congrats!
    I am done 18 years of post secondary education...multiple degrees and a part degree in there...
    Happy to be done.
    I billed my first code and made 20 bucks before taxes today (it isn't my clinic day but I had a phone call to a parent to do and after 2 attempts with no answer earlier this week i finally got through!)
    Hurray for staffhood
  24. Like
    Hanmari reacted to Intrepid86 in Not happy in medicine.. Not sure what to do?   
    Training is finite, and your current rotation is temporary. This perspective is important regardless if you are a student or resident. You will not enjoy everything equally. It is not required or expected. You thought your IM experience would be one thing, but it turned out to be another. Your expectations of medicine are starting to hit up against some of the realities. This is normal.
    When things get difficult, it is helpful to keep in mind that most personal struggles boil down to one binary decision; you either keep going, or you quit. This might sound callous, but it is by far the most important decision to make, and the decision most people are actually wavering on in their minds, whether they realize it or not. You always have the option to do one or the other, so make the decision first, then you'll realize things get simpler after that initial mental hurdle.
    For the sake of discussion, let's say you keep going. Now make the next important distinction. What things do you have control over, and what are the things you don't? It is wasted effort and energy to worry about things you have little or no control over, such as which rotation you're on, who the attending is, how they act, etc. What you do control is your own work ethic, attitude, and response to criticism. This type of stoic reflection is helpful to peel the layers of a problem, and also for one's own mental health, but it is skipped by 90% of people.
  25. Haha
    Hanmari got a reaction from LostLamb in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    I think you'll get a heavily negative bias by asking residents
×
×
  • Create New...