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Organomegaly

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  1. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from MD_Dream97 in Queen's or UofT Med?   
    Although I disagree with his comment that the home school advantage is not a real thing (it is for sure), a lot of what you say here has more to do with the city than the school itself. People simply favour the city of Toronto over many other cities. It IS a world-class city, no doubt. But you imply here people pick U of T for some sort of prestige or superiority over other educational experiences. In my experience, having known dozens of people from my undergraduate program who made the decision between Toronto and other Ontario medical schools, it was typically for the city that people went to Toronto. Statistically, many people will be hailing from the GTA originally and want to reconnect with family and social circles. Many of these people who went to U of T didn't particularly even like the Toronto curriculum or the over-crowedness of the learning atmosphere but, again, picked it for geographical reasons. Toronto is Toronto -- if you are a big city person, no city in Canada can match it.  With this in mind, it is really unfair to use the number of offers sent out by each school to compare U of T and Queen's for QUALITY when you are pitching Toronto against Kingston. 
    Aetherus makes good points that Queen's does have a recently revitalized curriculum and consistently boasts a match rate that is superior to more massive research centres like U of T and McMaster. Especially after U of T's basically record-setting abysmal match this year, this is true year after year. And Queen's does not necessarily send a large proportion of their class to family medicine either. Many of these matched people are Royal College bound specialists. 
    Another point you make is with regards to world class lecturers and hospitals, implying that by default this makes your learning better. This is a naive view. Toronto absolutely does offer this and as Canadians we should all be collectively proud of the accomplishments we've made as a whole from coast to coast, including those made at Toronto. But unless you are at the cutting edge of research in your field, the research accomplishments of your school do not necessarily translate into better learning experiences. McMaster also offers world-class renown researchers and clinicians, especially in internal medicine, some of whom are among the most cited researchers in the world (top 10-20 in the world for all-time citations). I did part of my clerkship with one such person, and to be honest, it was probably one of my most underwhelming learning experiences, and not because my learning expectations were high. This person was quite nice, but they were distant, absent and too specialized and often missed the big picture for a student. Although it was cool to say I've worked with them, the bulk of my learning and development as a physician is with the everyday clinicians. Clinicians who are dedicated to the teaching of medical students; they may not be the most seasoned researchers, or world experts, but I would take a teacher passionate about his students' learning over that any-day. You're in medical school to learn the the basics - and as someone else on this forum said, you can learn that just as effectively at Saskatchewan than you would at U of T or McMaster.
    I make a point of addressing your arguments because I worry that people would read them and fall to the dogma, selecting a school like U of T for the wrong reasons and not having their expectations met. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of good reasons to go to a school like Toronto, and if I had to select between most Ontario schools I would have gone to Toronto. But I do not believe the reasons you stated are those ones. 
  2. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to whatisgoingon in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    I think I have an idea what they like about that...
  3. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to Intrepid86 in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    That's true. Family doctors can certainly niche their practices into something more specialized, but I feel it's not really answering the question that was posed. The OP is largely referring to career satisfaction derived from family medicine in its most traditional, comprehensive care form.
  4. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from rawshrimp in Picking Mac over other schools?   
    Speaking as a senior resident in a medicine program that has also been involved in CaRMS selection. Your evaluators will NOT care the process by which you were selected for medical school. They will barely even recognize that. What will matter is your interpersonal skills and clinical competence. Period.  
    All medical schools will be adversely affected by COVID. This is not a Mac unique problem, Mac being a year shorter wont matter because all schools will have to contend for overlapping cohorts contending for experiences. There is only so much clinical availability for opportunities. 
  5. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to hijkl in .   
    okay, this post seems a little dramatic to me. if this person passed the MMI at mac, i'm sure they also could have just as easily passed the MMI at queen's or the panel at western/ottawa/toronto. 
    if anything (and i don't think it does mean anything), this shows that the lottery system is a perfectly fine alternative since the MMI isn't able to screen for people like this dude anyway.
  6. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from TDP in Picking Mac over other schools?   
    Speaking as a senior resident in a medicine program that has also been involved in CaRMS selection. Your evaluators will NOT care the process by which you were selected for medical school. They will barely even recognize that. What will matter is your interpersonal skills and clinical competence. Period.  
    All medical schools will be adversely affected by COVID. This is not a Mac unique problem, Mac being a year shorter wont matter because all schools will have to contend for overlapping cohorts contending for experiences. There is only so much clinical availability for opportunities. 
  7. Thanks
    Organomegaly got a reaction from ancef in Picking Mac over other schools?   
    Speaking as a senior resident in a medicine program that has also been involved in CaRMS selection. Your evaluators will NOT care the process by which you were selected for medical school. They will barely even recognize that. What will matter is your interpersonal skills and clinical competence. Period.  
    All medical schools will be adversely affected by COVID. This is not a Mac unique problem, Mac being a year shorter wont matter because all schools will have to contend for overlapping cohorts contending for experiences. There is only so much clinical availability for opportunities. 
  8. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from 5th time the charm in Picking Mac over other schools?   
    Speaking as a senior resident in a medicine program that has also been involved in CaRMS selection. Your evaluators will NOT care the process by which you were selected for medical school. They will barely even recognize that. What will matter is your interpersonal skills and clinical competence. Period.  
    All medical schools will be adversely affected by COVID. This is not a Mac unique problem, Mac being a year shorter wont matter because all schools will have to contend for overlapping cohorts contending for experiences. There is only so much clinical availability for opportunities. 
  9. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from Aegean in Picking Mac over other schools?   
    Speaking as a senior resident in a medicine program that has also been involved in CaRMS selection. Your evaluators will NOT care the process by which you were selected for medical school. They will barely even recognize that. What will matter is your interpersonal skills and clinical competence. Period.  
    All medical schools will be adversely affected by COVID. This is not a Mac unique problem, Mac being a year shorter wont matter because all schools will have to contend for overlapping cohorts contending for experiences. There is only so much clinical availability for opportunities. 
  10. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from Wesmosis in MCCQE Part 1 New Format - How to Study   
    I have no hard evidence of that statement! It's just been something a few of my classmates have tossed around the grapevine. I agree it would change studying significantly so if anyone finds out for sure it may be helpful to know
  11. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to PhD2MD in A Cautionary Tale: 7 years as a premed gunner with an A average & Why I chose Money over medicine   
    I think we should take it easy on this guy/let this die. I had a patient today that was eerily similar. Really felt for him, and then remembered this thread.
  12. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to Arztin in A Cautionary Tale: 7 years as a premed gunner with an A average & Why I chose Money over medicine   
    This thread is getting nowhere. I find it a bit too inflammatory. Therefore, I will lock it. 
    Good luck in your future endeavors canuck!
  13. Like
  14. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from DrOzuma in Ever Feel Like Med School Is A Big Rich Kids Club?   
    sup soul sistah
  15. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to Bambi in Worried About Debt   
    I owe over 200K and am not concerned as I should be able to pay it off after residency.
  16. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from Arztin in MCCQE Part 1 New Format - How to Study   
  17. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to Arztin in MCCQE Part 1 New Format - How to Study   
    The SOR includes a total score, the pass score and final result (e.g. pass, fail). The total score is reported on a scale ranging from 100 to 400 with a mean of 250 and a standard deviation of 30 based on all spring 2018 results. The current pass score is 226 and was established by a panel of physician experts from across the country following a rigorous standard setting exercise in June 2018.
     
    https://mcc.ca/research-and-development/score-interpretation/
  18. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from Monkey D. Luffy in Queen's or UofT Med?   
    Although I disagree with his comment that the home school advantage is not a real thing (it is for sure), a lot of what you say here has more to do with the city than the school itself. People simply favour the city of Toronto over many other cities. It IS a world-class city, no doubt. But you imply here people pick U of T for some sort of prestige or superiority over other educational experiences. In my experience, having known dozens of people from my undergraduate program who made the decision between Toronto and other Ontario medical schools, it was typically for the city that people went to Toronto. Statistically, many people will be hailing from the GTA originally and want to reconnect with family and social circles. Many of these people who went to U of T didn't particularly even like the Toronto curriculum or the over-crowedness of the learning atmosphere but, again, picked it for geographical reasons. Toronto is Toronto -- if you are a big city person, no city in Canada can match it.  With this in mind, it is really unfair to use the number of offers sent out by each school to compare U of T and Queen's for QUALITY when you are pitching Toronto against Kingston. 
    Aetherus makes good points that Queen's does have a recently revitalized curriculum and consistently boasts a match rate that is superior to more massive research centres like U of T and McMaster. Especially after U of T's basically record-setting abysmal match this year, this is true year after year. And Queen's does not necessarily send a large proportion of their class to family medicine either. Many of these matched people are Royal College bound specialists. 
    Another point you make is with regards to world class lecturers and hospitals, implying that by default this makes your learning better. This is a naive view. Toronto absolutely does offer this and as Canadians we should all be collectively proud of the accomplishments we've made as a whole from coast to coast, including those made at Toronto. But unless you are at the cutting edge of research in your field, the research accomplishments of your school do not necessarily translate into better learning experiences. McMaster also offers world-class renown researchers and clinicians, especially in internal medicine, some of whom are among the most cited researchers in the world (top 10-20 in the world for all-time citations). I did part of my clerkship with one such person, and to be honest, it was probably one of my most underwhelming learning experiences, and not because my learning expectations were high. This person was quite nice, but they were distant, absent and too specialized and often missed the big picture for a student. Although it was cool to say I've worked with them, the bulk of my learning and development as a physician is with the everyday clinicians. Clinicians who are dedicated to the teaching of medical students; they may not be the most seasoned researchers, or world experts, but I would take a teacher passionate about his students' learning over that any-day. You're in medical school to learn the the basics - and as someone else on this forum said, you can learn that just as effectively at Saskatchewan than you would at U of T or McMaster.
    I make a point of addressing your arguments because I worry that people would read them and fall to the dogma, selecting a school like U of T for the wrong reasons and not having their expectations met. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of good reasons to go to a school like Toronto, and if I had to select between most Ontario schools I would have gone to Toronto. But I do not believe the reasons you stated are those ones. 
  19. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from Edict in Queen's or UofT Med?   
    Although I disagree with his comment that the home school advantage is not a real thing (it is for sure), a lot of what you say here has more to do with the city than the school itself. People simply favour the city of Toronto over many other cities. It IS a world-class city, no doubt. But you imply here people pick U of T for some sort of prestige or superiority over other educational experiences. In my experience, having known dozens of people from my undergraduate program who made the decision between Toronto and other Ontario medical schools, it was typically for the city that people went to Toronto. Statistically, many people will be hailing from the GTA originally and want to reconnect with family and social circles. Many of these people who went to U of T didn't particularly even like the Toronto curriculum or the over-crowedness of the learning atmosphere but, again, picked it for geographical reasons. Toronto is Toronto -- if you are a big city person, no city in Canada can match it.  With this in mind, it is really unfair to use the number of offers sent out by each school to compare U of T and Queen's for QUALITY when you are pitching Toronto against Kingston. 
    Aetherus makes good points that Queen's does have a recently revitalized curriculum and consistently boasts a match rate that is superior to more massive research centres like U of T and McMaster. Especially after U of T's basically record-setting abysmal match this year, this is true year after year. And Queen's does not necessarily send a large proportion of their class to family medicine either. Many of these matched people are Royal College bound specialists. 
    Another point you make is with regards to world class lecturers and hospitals, implying that by default this makes your learning better. This is a naive view. Toronto absolutely does offer this and as Canadians we should all be collectively proud of the accomplishments we've made as a whole from coast to coast, including those made at Toronto. But unless you are at the cutting edge of research in your field, the research accomplishments of your school do not necessarily translate into better learning experiences. McMaster also offers world-class renown researchers and clinicians, especially in internal medicine, some of whom are among the most cited researchers in the world (top 10-20 in the world for all-time citations). I did part of my clerkship with one such person, and to be honest, it was probably one of my most underwhelming learning experiences, and not because my learning expectations were high. This person was quite nice, but they were distant, absent and too specialized and often missed the big picture for a student. Although it was cool to say I've worked with them, the bulk of my learning and development as a physician is with the everyday clinicians. Clinicians who are dedicated to the teaching of medical students; they may not be the most seasoned researchers, or world experts, but I would take a teacher passionate about his students' learning over that any-day. You're in medical school to learn the the basics - and as someone else on this forum said, you can learn that just as effectively at Saskatchewan than you would at U of T or McMaster.
    I make a point of addressing your arguments because I worry that people would read them and fall to the dogma, selecting a school like U of T for the wrong reasons and not having their expectations met. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of good reasons to go to a school like Toronto, and if I had to select between most Ontario schools I would have gone to Toronto. But I do not believe the reasons you stated are those ones. 
  20. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from Aetherus in Queen's or UofT Med?   
    Although I disagree with his comment that the home school advantage is not a real thing (it is for sure), a lot of what you say here has more to do with the city than the school itself. People simply favour the city of Toronto over many other cities. It IS a world-class city, no doubt. But you imply here people pick U of T for some sort of prestige or superiority over other educational experiences. In my experience, having known dozens of people from my undergraduate program who made the decision between Toronto and other Ontario medical schools, it was typically for the city that people went to Toronto. Statistically, many people will be hailing from the GTA originally and want to reconnect with family and social circles. Many of these people who went to U of T didn't particularly even like the Toronto curriculum or the over-crowedness of the learning atmosphere but, again, picked it for geographical reasons. Toronto is Toronto -- if you are a big city person, no city in Canada can match it.  With this in mind, it is really unfair to use the number of offers sent out by each school to compare U of T and Queen's for QUALITY when you are pitching Toronto against Kingston. 
    Aetherus makes good points that Queen's does have a recently revitalized curriculum and consistently boasts a match rate that is superior to more massive research centres like U of T and McMaster. Especially after U of T's basically record-setting abysmal match this year, this is true year after year. And Queen's does not necessarily send a large proportion of their class to family medicine either. Many of these matched people are Royal College bound specialists. 
    Another point you make is with regards to world class lecturers and hospitals, implying that by default this makes your learning better. This is a naive view. Toronto absolutely does offer this and as Canadians we should all be collectively proud of the accomplishments we've made as a whole from coast to coast, including those made at Toronto. But unless you are at the cutting edge of research in your field, the research accomplishments of your school do not necessarily translate into better learning experiences. McMaster also offers world-class renown researchers and clinicians, especially in internal medicine, some of whom are among the most cited researchers in the world (top 10-20 in the world for all-time citations). I did part of my clerkship with one such person, and to be honest, it was probably one of my most underwhelming learning experiences, and not because my learning expectations were high. This person was quite nice, but they were distant, absent and too specialized and often missed the big picture for a student. Although it was cool to say I've worked with them, the bulk of my learning and development as a physician is with the everyday clinicians. Clinicians who are dedicated to the teaching of medical students; they may not be the most seasoned researchers, or world experts, but I would take a teacher passionate about his students' learning over that any-day. You're in medical school to learn the the basics - and as someone else on this forum said, you can learn that just as effectively at Saskatchewan than you would at U of T or McMaster.
    I make a point of addressing your arguments because I worry that people would read them and fall to the dogma, selecting a school like U of T for the wrong reasons and not having their expectations met. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of good reasons to go to a school like Toronto, and if I had to select between most Ontario schools I would have gone to Toronto. But I do not believe the reasons you stated are those ones. 
  21. Like
    Organomegaly got a reaction from Sauna in Queen's or UofT Med?   
    Although I disagree with his comment that the home school advantage is not a real thing (it is for sure), a lot of what you say here has more to do with the city than the school itself. People simply favour the city of Toronto over many other cities. It IS a world-class city, no doubt. But you imply here people pick U of T for some sort of prestige or superiority over other educational experiences. In my experience, having known dozens of people from my undergraduate program who made the decision between Toronto and other Ontario medical schools, it was typically for the city that people went to Toronto. Statistically, many people will be hailing from the GTA originally and want to reconnect with family and social circles. Many of these people who went to U of T didn't particularly even like the Toronto curriculum or the over-crowedness of the learning atmosphere but, again, picked it for geographical reasons. Toronto is Toronto -- if you are a big city person, no city in Canada can match it.  With this in mind, it is really unfair to use the number of offers sent out by each school to compare U of T and Queen's for QUALITY when you are pitching Toronto against Kingston. 
    Aetherus makes good points that Queen's does have a recently revitalized curriculum and consistently boasts a match rate that is superior to more massive research centres like U of T and McMaster. Especially after U of T's basically record-setting abysmal match this year, this is true year after year. And Queen's does not necessarily send a large proportion of their class to family medicine either. Many of these matched people are Royal College bound specialists. 
    Another point you make is with regards to world class lecturers and hospitals, implying that by default this makes your learning better. This is a naive view. Toronto absolutely does offer this and as Canadians we should all be collectively proud of the accomplishments we've made as a whole from coast to coast, including those made at Toronto. But unless you are at the cutting edge of research in your field, the research accomplishments of your school do not necessarily translate into better learning experiences. McMaster also offers world-class renown researchers and clinicians, especially in internal medicine, some of whom are among the most cited researchers in the world (top 10-20 in the world for all-time citations). I did part of my clerkship with one such person, and to be honest, it was probably one of my most underwhelming learning experiences, and not because my learning expectations were high. This person was quite nice, but they were distant, absent and too specialized and often missed the big picture for a student. Although it was cool to say I've worked with them, the bulk of my learning and development as a physician is with the everyday clinicians. Clinicians who are dedicated to the teaching of medical students; they may not be the most seasoned researchers, or world experts, but I would take a teacher passionate about his students' learning over that any-day. You're in medical school to learn the the basics - and as someone else on this forum said, you can learn that just as effectively at Saskatchewan than you would at U of T or McMaster.
    I make a point of addressing your arguments because I worry that people would read them and fall to the dogma, selecting a school like U of T for the wrong reasons and not having their expectations met. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of good reasons to go to a school like Toronto, and if I had to select between most Ontario schools I would have gone to Toronto. But I do not believe the reasons you stated are those ones. 
  22. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to Edict in UBC vs UofT   
    Prestige seriously doesn't matter one bit. It will be cold comfort if you go to a medical school you don't enjoy in other ways. Even  the idea of shadowing "top tier specialists" doesn't make a difference to a medical student. Medical school is actually an undergraduate degree, you are learning the basics and the basics can be taught the same no matter where you are. 
    Important factors to focus on: 
    1. Do medical school where you want to match for residency
    2. Do medical school in a place you want to live, this is 3-4 years of your life, make sure you are happy with them!
    3. Do medical school in places in a place you feel can support any specialty decisions you might make
    If after these things you still can't decide, you are probably safe to assume that no matter which you end up choosing, you will do just fine. 
     
     
     
  23. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to PhD2MD in U of T vs. MacMed   
    For what it's worth, I was in the same situation (multiple offers including U of T, which was my undergrad + closer to home). I chose Mac because:
    -it's 3 years (I'm a bit older)
    -it felt like research/clinical networking would be easier here
    -I felt like there was less unnecessary stuff forced down your throat
    -Toronto is just to busy and loud for me
    -opportunity cost: U of T costs ~20k more in tuition + ~300k in lost wages + ____k in increased living expenses...all told 300-500k extra to go to U of T, which wasn't worth it to me. I don't think any experience could have made up for that. But this is the most subjective point.
    -if I wanted to specialize/gun I knew I could convert Mac into a 4 year program and get an extra year for electives/research to become very competitive, in the same time that it would take to graduate from a traditional 4 year school
    2 years later, and I stand by those points. Networking/connections/opportunities are easy to create at McMaster. Life is more chill because you're not constantly tested on details that you only memorized for the test. Sometimes I wonder if I made a mistake by turning down the "prestige" associated with U of T (mostly when I here other people talking about it). I will say that I think U of T has a better curriculum UNLESS your good with self-direction, in which case Mac will serve you well.
    Hope that helps you make up your mind. Remember: whatever your choice is, your life is going to be great + you can always attend other school for residency or fellowship.
  24. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to 2hopeful in U of T vs. MacMed   
    Something thats sort of underrated is Hamilton as a city. Contrary to popular belief, hamilton is a growing and thriving city with lots of good food and beautiful waterfalls and hikes. Its a great way to destress. There is a true sense of community in hamilton and if you want to be involved with tackling some of the issues Hamiltonians face (social determinants of health) theres lots of people doing work. Also the cost of living in Hamilton and U of T is drastically different, if you want to consider things like debt. 
    MAC has alot of strong researchers in bench work, clinical epi, etc. My mac med friends that I have spoken to havent really described any stress in the preclinical years and find it quite enjoyable. Depends on your learning style. 
  25. Like
    Organomegaly reacted to freewheeler in U of T vs. MacMed   
    In that case a 3 yr program sounds like a better fit. If you are deadset on a competitive specialty however, be aware that you'll have to really be on top of your time management and self-care routine as you'll have to be much more proactive in planning things and building your CV during a shorter program and without summers. Not to mention the stress of having electives prior to clerkship rotations at a 3 yr program.
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