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5th time the charm

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  1. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from DentKoolKid in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  2. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from melyee in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  3. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to -D- in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Result: Accepted off "good" waitlist (May 25, 2018)
    Stream: English
    Time Stamp: May 8, 2018, 7:45 AM (waitlist)
    wGPA: 3.94
    CASPer: I really like this test, though I am a quick typer and I understand why some people feel it is unfair in that respect. My volunteer and work experiences were really useful for helping me think critically, while being empathetic to multiple sides in a situation and ultimately explaining why I would take approach X vs. Y. I definitely had lots of examples prepared (conflict in teams, strengths, weaknesses) in case I needed to use them on the fly. 
    ECs: heavily involved in a social service organization (volunteer, became supervisor, then became board member), lots of research experience in medicine/pharmacy and psychology (1 publication, another 1 on the way... hopefully!, some conference presentations), multiple long-term jobs working with homeless and individuals with mental illness
    Interview: thought i connected really well with 2 members of the panel, maybe not so well with one of the other members. My hunch about these panel interviews is that they average the score of the three panelists, and if I were to take a wild guess, I might have been scored as 2x4.0 and 1x3.5 (since I was waitlisted). At first I felt fantastic coming out of the interview, but started to really feel like shite later on. I kept going over and over my answers, and started feeling like I had thrown all my interview prep out the window, didn't feel like I took enough time relating scenarios to my actual experience and didn't feel like I was able to sell myself given the question style.
    Year: Just graduating UG (see below)
    Geography: IP
     
    Non-trad: I went to college after high school and worked in the trades for a bit. I wanted a change and I was lucky to land a job in health care administration, then a job in the government. I did online and nighttime high school courses while still working to get my grade 12 "U" credits to apply to university when I discovered an interest in medicine. I left my decent paying government job to pursue undergrad full time so that I could apply to medicine. It has been a long 7+ year journey, with many people telling me along the way it was an unrealistic goal. If you want medicine, my advice is go for it! Don't let anyone dictate to you what you should and shouldn't strive for  
  4. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to OodleNoodle in McMaster Waitlist Party   
    Just received an offer off the waitlist this morning to hamilton campus! Will most likely accept
  5. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to OldManWinter in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlist Thread   
    Posting for the first time hopefully to give others hope, particularly OOP's with underwhelming stats. I know that this may not be a perfectly representative sample of all applicants, but I've checked this website for a long time and have often been overwhelmed by the stats of others. 
     
    TIME STAMP: Mon Mar 26th @ 10:09pm (Checked Minerva for the first time around 12:30 and it was up)
    Result: Accepted
    Region: OOP
    Year: Graduated Masters in 2016, Undergrad in 2014
    cGPA: 3.87, pre-reqGPA: 3.86 
    MCAT: 510 (125/127/127/131) - Again pretty underwhelming but I contacted the admissions office directly and they from what they said submitting your MCAT can only help you. For post interview (80% MMI, 20% prereq) if you submit your MCAT they calculate your prereq score using 1) just your courses and 2) using courses and MCAT at 50:50 (their words). They then take the higher of the two. Unless your MCAT is atrocious I can't see why submitting it would hurt. 
    ECs: I've always tried to do things I loved and not for the sake of boosting my resume. Not criticizing anyone of doing the latter but had been advised to take this approach by many people in the medical field early on in my university career and I think it boded well for my personal development and growth. I have one first author pub submitted, 3 conference presentations, captain of a varsity rugby team, a few big scholarships and grants, 4 pretty diverse medical placements that involved patient contact (more for my own understanding of if this is what I wanted to pursue), a couple service trips abroad, and a few other odds and ends. 
    Interview Prep: I probably over prepared but knew that was what I needed to do to feel my best. I do think running through MMI situations and practicing them out loud can be incredibly helpful, especially doing it with a variety of people to get a variety of feedback. Also knowing yourself, the experiences you've had and what you've learned I think can be really valuable. 
     
    I had an awesome girl in Med-1 give me some guidance and advice for how to prepare, in addition to showing me around the school the day before my interview. I'm not in the program yet so it's hard for me to know, but based on what she said and my impression - McGill really cares about who you are as a person and how you interact with other people, especially at the interview stage. The best advice she gave me was to relax and be yourself and if you can walk out of the interview feeling like you did that then you have nothing to regret. Everyone is going to feel like there are little things they would've done differently - that's normal in challenging and time constrained situations. 
    It's been 8 years since I started undergrad. I went straight from undergrad to a masters and applied to 3 schools without the MCAT for 2016 (including McGill) and was granted 0 interviews. Took a year off and worked and wrote the MCAT and reapplied to all the schools I met the cut-off criteria for across the country this time (10 schools). I got 9 outright rejections and one interview waitlist (at McGill). Was pulled off the waitlist 2 weeks before interviews (which I would think means I was pretty close to the bottom of the barrel) and was lucky enough to be in the 10 selected on Monday. This doesn't mean I'm imploring you to never give up. If I was rejected that would've been it for me, my physiotherapy pre-requisites are all expiring after this year and I wanted to start moving forward with the schooling process and my life in general. I get both sides of that discussion. Perhaps this message can be hopeful for one person though, and if that's the case I'll happy I did it. 
    So so excited for the opportunity. See y'all in August. 
     
  6. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to im_edgy_asf in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlist Thread   
    You gave me shivers. I really relate to you for various reasons. So I'm telling you, Sincerely, and from the bottom of my Heart, Congratulations, you deserve it.
  7. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to HoopDreams in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlist Thread   
    TIME STAMP: 9:00AM Result: Admitted with Condition (MDCM) cGPA: 3.80, pre-reqGPA: 3.4 MCAT: Not submitted ECs: Lots. Year: B.Sc. + B. Sc.  + M. Sc.  Interview preparation : Did 0 preparation. Not a single book. Nothing.  Post-interview feeling right after : I had no regrets and I was proud. That was enough for me. Post-interview feeling weeks after : You start to question everything. That's normal. Let it go. Attempt : Fourth attempt IP/OOP/International: IP I never thought I would ever post on here.
    I was already enrolled for next semester to re-take my pre-requesites and I had paid the tuition for it.
    I had accepted that I would be refused.
    It is very hard to summarize a 10 years long journey in a few sentences.
    I could write a book about my journey, my feelings and my doubts.
    If I had to give advice to a future applicant, here is what I would say :
    Before getting accepted, try to accept the idea that it might never happen. Define yourself beyond your medical path. Don't do things because they would look good on a C.V. Live your life. Take every extra year as an opportunity to grow your life. Don't see it as an extra year of suffering and waiting.  When you get accepted, everything makes sense. Every doubt you had suddenly turns into sparks of hope. It is very hard to describe. After you get accepted, life feels lighter but you realize that it's another journey that starts. I wish I could explain myself but I had the worst odds against me and I made it. Not because I am unique. Because I was lucky. I truly believe I am. Therefore, if it is your dream, follow your heart and never give up. Never give up. Never ever give up.
  8. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to IMislove in Queens Waitlist 2018   
    It was bound to happen. I want you all to know that you’re not a failure, you may have just been delayed. Being on the waitlist is a good thing because they obviously liked what they saw, just the competition is so great, they cna only have so many. Last year I was straight rejected after my interview. That hurt, but it made me want to work even harder this year. I knew my interview was holding me back, especially after getting a second interview, so I focused my energy in it as much as I could. Queens definitely gives a huge amount of points to interview post interview, so reflect on what happened. Were you so nervous it affected how you could think, speak, etc. Any nervous ticks? The difference between my two interviews was nerves and structure. Practice makes perfect theybsay, and although you won’t perform perfectly during the interview (I didn’t), I knew I performed better than last year. Refocus your energy and improvement and continuing your ECs. Refine OMSAS descriptions if you can. But for now, take this time for yourself, feel the feelings you need to feel, and spend time with your family and friends. Enjoy this summer and really go hard in August for OMSAS. I wish you all the best of luck next year.
  9. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to IMislove in Queens Waitlist 2018   
    Deferrals from last year could be counted, 104 is just confirmed class mates. So we can be over 105 with deferrals from last year.
  10. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to Bambi in I'm done   
    The OP is not in prison and has every opportunity for the future! Perception becomes reality, so OP, change your perception.
    I would say almost half of the 40 interviewees for the 3 residency spots were “gunners”, they had lots of electives, research, brown nosing. Not one of them were accepted to the program. Why? They were all deemed as unsuitable in the sense that they were not a good fit for the team in place. Five years is a long time and he selection team could not picture themselves working with these otherwise meritorious applicants day in and day out. I, on the other hand, during the elective at this school, and during my interview, was just myself - with my soft skills. I had no research, no publications in the field, no in depth knowledge, no contacts, all I had was my work ethic, friendly and helpful personality, a willingness to work hard and learn, and as the interviewers determined, I would make a good fit - which is what happened. Along the way during residency, I developed excellent research skills and have numerous publications at this point. Clearly, by any standard, I lived up to the expected standards, and likely exceeded them. I was a diamond in the rough for which they saw potential. What is merit based is in the eyes of the beholders, I.e., the decision makers. Being good or even excellent on paper is not even half the battle.
     
  11. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from Cheers2life in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  12. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from PFT22135 in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  13. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from Bluecolorisnice in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  14. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from HappyAndHopeful in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  15. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from IMislove in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  16. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from mew in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  17. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from LostLamb in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  18. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from End Poverty in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I will chime in here. I would encourage you to talk with someone. To give you some perspective, it took me 5 years to get into McMaster (after being granted interviews the last 4 years I applied) . It was my dream school and the only one I applied to. I was too afraid to write the MCAT because I was a non-traditional student and I was so intimidated by what you had to know in science, chemistry and physics and I talked myself out of writing it  and of course it narrowed down my choices for which school I could apply to.  I was a teacher before I was accepted into medicine. I graduated from my 5 year residency when I was 33. The best friends I have are the ones I made in med school. I had the time of my life in medical school and why- likely because as med students you have so much in common and one would hope there is a genuine degree of caring for your fellow classmates and the competitiveness of getting in was behind me and I was not interested in going after a super competitive speciality.  I met my significant other as an intern and I was in a long distance relationship for over 3 years. I found ways of making it work including transferring programs (cities) so I could live with my husband.
    I think some of the negativity about medicine may come from being talking to people on the front lines and as the Ontario government goes, the fact that the MD's of Ont. have not had a contract in over 5 years. It would be easy for me to get caught up in all of this but then it comes back to reflecting on what it took for me to get accepted to my dream school, the sacrifices that got me there and how much I love my job with the autonomy it brings me and how priviledged I feel to be able to help people in the capacity I do.  I treat many people who hate their jobs (from all walks of life) and are struggling because this is what they need to do to feed their families and keep a roof over their heads. 
      I saw a patient today who will be able to have life changing treatment soon instead of waiting for another year. I made time to see this patient on a day I usually don't work (trying to arrive at that life-work-working mom balance). The gratitude this patient felt and being able to leave my office "with a plan" made my day.
    For me, medicine comes down to making a difference in peoples lives and feeling good about what contributions you can make.  It also means being realistic too about your limitations, what makes you apprehensive and what you can see yourself doing at the end of the day.  There is so much flexibility in medicine and that is what is so great about it.  It can take some time to find your way in medicine and find your niche. I hope you can take some time and think this decision through.   
  19. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from 2hopeful in Queens Waitlist 2018   
    LOL- congrats- you had 2 posts on May 30th that appeared to count you out of the running for a spot....so glad it has all worked out for you now go celebrate !!! 
  20. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to 2hopeful in Queens Waitlist 2018   
    Got off waitlist June 7, 11 am! Good luck to everyone.
  21. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from Butterfly_ in McMaster Waitlist Party   
    Where do you see yourself practicing when you are done? This could be a factor, as well as where your family and friends are. Can’t go wrong with either. My only  acceptance after 4 interviews in a row and final acceptance my last try after 5 application cycles was at McMaster. Best time of my life....best wishes with your decision. 
     
  22. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to Monica Geller in Queens Waitlist 2018   
    I posted my stats, but wanted to post here as well. Last year I was immediately offered an interview (rejected from everywhere else) at McMaster but than spent the summer on the waitlist (unsuccessfully) so I know how that feels very very well.
    Took this year off - was rejected from A TON of jobs in the healthcare field (which really hurt following the waitlist drag out and ultimate rejection) and ended up working 2 part time jobs: 1 in a high volume upssclae restaurant one at a healthcare start up. While my GPA is on the lower side of things My ECs refelect my "take opportunities where they arise" so while I do have a couple long term consitant things on their I also have summers doing only semi related lab work that allowed me to travel. Funnily enough in my panel interview they LOVED that I work as a hostess (short high volume client processing but making sure you are effecient and accurate). Any thing can help just look for skills everywhere!
    This round I was rejected across canada, but ended up getting a interview from queens off the waitlist (that I didn't even know I was on) and just got an acceptance off the waitlist!!! I am definitely more of an atypical case so just wanted to post to give people some hope, it is possible with a bit of (read: a ton of) luck!! just keep trying and dont give up just yet, use it to stregthen your resolve and start looking for any opportunity!
    *sorry for the long post, I just know how hard this is and hope it helps someone 
  23. Like
    5th time the charm got a reaction from IMislove in Queens Waitlist 2018   
    Welcome to the 5th time the charm club 
  24. Thanks
    5th time the charm reacted to IMislove in Queens Waitlist 2018   
    I will, so tired and need to volunteer now lol. I hope it inspires people. Thank you for the kind words
  25. Like
    5th time the charm reacted to Rekabnire in Accepted, waitlisted, rejected 2017-2018 (actual stats start on P8)   
    ACCEPTED!!! (After many tries)
    timestamp: 9:55
     
    IP
    GPA: 3.5 Undergrad, 4.0 Grad
    MCAT: 505 (CARS 130)
    ECs: A ton of health related volunteering, leadership positions in most current volunteer positions. A ton of work experience, including clinical research. 
    Interview: I felt good about 5/8 MMI and felt pretty good leaving the traditional, compared to previous years
    SJT: Felt pretty good about it, finished it really quickly, but who knows!
     
    Congrats to everyone else accepted, good luck to the waitlisters (I've been there twice - it's the worst), and good luck next year to everyone else! I've had a lot of disappointments, but today cancelled out ALL of that. Keep at it if you really want it, and you'll get in!
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