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CardiacArrhythmia

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  1. Thanks
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from conbrio in Social Accountability Initiative WGPA Cut-off   
    The 2 reserved seatings are designed for the pool of SAI applicants. It’s stated that you need to 1) be eligible for the seats first and 2) you’re placed into a different pool if you’re eligible for SAI status. If you don’t qualify for SAI status your application is moved back into the general French or English stream. So really, you need to qualify for SAI prior to file review.
    But with all things new and unclear, seek clarity from admissions through phone/email.
  2. Thanks
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from conbrio in Social Accountability Initiative WGPA Cut-off   
    If I read on that website correctly, SAI have to undergo the exact same pre-criteria as the general stream, therefore GPA, CASPer, ABS are subjective to the same cut-offs/scoring as the general stream. The only difference is that pre-interview you have a two chances to receive an interview invite 
  3. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia reacted to QuestionsAbound in Casper scoring question   
    If you haven’t written the test yet: always answer every part of the question.
    If you have written the test: there is no sense worrying. You can’t change how you performed and will never receive feedback on how you did. If you need to write the test again in the future, answer all of the questions. Until that time comes, don’t worry about it.
  4. Thanks
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from conbrio in Casper scoring question   
    I’m not a marker personally, but many of my colleague are. The process for scoring isn’t secretive at all they’re pretty explicit about it on their webinars in previous years. And I had typo, I didn’t mean hostile but rather “holistic” basis. 
  5. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia reacted to IMislove in volunteer at daycare for med school admissions?   
    I feel like over the years, I too have become tired, when things are easily searchable (what I always did starting out). Maybe time for us to retire from here.
  6. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from fun in Deleted.   
  7. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from GrandeLatte in Undergrad Research Publications?   
    Most UG students that publish in adequate journals are likely hopping on to a current graduate student's work. As long as you show significant contributions, the graduate student and PI can put you down as an author. In addition, it also depends on the type of research done...wet lab research takes years to push out a publication do to the amount of waiting they have to do for their experimental models + retests to improve validity. 
    Publishing an article in an no name, zero impact factor journal, to me, doesn't showcase anything. 
  8. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from sinusoid in Where Did the "It Takes An Average of 3 Cycles" Maxim Come From?   
    Table F10 on this: https://afmc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/en/Publications/CMES/CMES2018-SectionF.pdf

    The average applicant is 2.76 in 2017/2018 cycle. However if UofT actually submitted their data, I see that number closer to 2.80-2.82. Also, Dr. Ian Walker from Calgary has stated the ~3 cycles average multiple times as well. 
  9. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from targaryen in Where Did the "It Takes An Average of 3 Cycles" Maxim Come From?   
    Table F10 on this: https://afmc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/en/Publications/CMES/CMES2018-SectionF.pdf

    The average applicant is 2.76 in 2017/2018 cycle. However if UofT actually submitted their data, I see that number closer to 2.80-2.82. Also, Dr. Ian Walker from Calgary has stated the ~3 cycles average multiple times as well. 
  10. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from MedicineLCS in Where Did the "It Takes An Average of 3 Cycles" Maxim Come From?   
    Table F10 on this: https://afmc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/en/Publications/CMES/CMES2018-SectionF.pdf

    The average applicant is 2.76 in 2017/2018 cycle. However if UofT actually submitted their data, I see that number closer to 2.80-2.82. Also, Dr. Ian Walker from Calgary has stated the ~3 cycles average multiple times as well. 
  11. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from targaryen in A flawed process?   
    Read up Marsha Barber's article written in 2016: https://www.universityaffairs.ca/features/feature-article/medical-school-admissions-process-skewed/. Some of your points do align with her article and how she saw the process unfold for her son. 

    I also want to say that every year, med schools get great applicants but unfortunately not everyone can get through. Many factors are outside the applicant's control as well. Despite Canada in great need for primary care, the federal and provincial governments are limiting (and also looking to cut) down on educational and occupational funding for healthcare. The result? A reduction in employment, reduction in residency spots, a CAPPING of MD seats due to limited residency spots...the spiral chain continues further down. 

    In regards to "people who you thought would get in and those who you thought wouldn't ended up getting in", I found that people who were often (for a lack of a better word), ARROGANT, were the one's who tend to show more confidence in their interview skills. Once you get to the interview stage, it's all about being confident in who you are and being to portray yourself and again "gaming" the system. Some people are good at lying at interviews and about their experiences with a straight face - this happens in all types of interviews whether it be a job or med school. Would they eventually make a good doctor? Probably not. But in the moment, the interviewer could think he/she makes an amazing physicians. Remember they got through 1 gate, but not the 2nd gate, being residency. I have known an individual who got into med school, being arrogant and lying his way through to an acceptance...but where did he ended up? Being rejected from all the residency positions he applied to.  
    Also, I am going to bring up sociological factors here. Socioeconomic status differences provide different levels of thinking often with low SES being more empathetic due to the personal experiences they experience themselves - this could also mean that they are more aware and react more emotionally on what's going on around them. At times, this may or may not be the best for interviews as many distractors can be thrown your way to phase you out. Also, at the interview stage, I commonly believe those from the admission committee from a high SES background will never TRULY and FULLY understand what these people go through. I really do advocate for more diversity in the process - having members of the committee being from a low SES background, on a panel and/or a few MMI stations. I have literally met a few practicing doctors, both younger and older,  who have dismissed cultural factors and made indirect racial comments towards my family for seeking medical care - these physicians were simply culturally incompetent and rude.
    Luckily, med admissions is starting to notice the trend in their admissions. Although, we will likely not see a significant change immediately in the doctor population, we are gradually shifting towards a better approach with expected change in the distant future. 
  12. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from IMislove in A flawed process?   
    Read up Marsha Barber's article written in 2016: https://www.universityaffairs.ca/features/feature-article/medical-school-admissions-process-skewed/. Some of your points do align with her article and how she saw the process unfold for her son. 

    I also want to say that every year, med schools get great applicants but unfortunately not everyone can get through. Many factors are outside the applicant's control as well. Despite Canada in great need for primary care, the federal and provincial governments are limiting (and also looking to cut) down on educational and occupational funding for healthcare. The result? A reduction in employment, reduction in residency spots, a CAPPING of MD seats due to limited residency spots...the spiral chain continues further down. 

    In regards to "people who you thought would get in and those who you thought wouldn't ended up getting in", I found that people who were often (for a lack of a better word), ARROGANT, were the one's who tend to show more confidence in their interview skills. Once you get to the interview stage, it's all about being confident in who you are and being to portray yourself and again "gaming" the system. Some people are good at lying at interviews and about their experiences with a straight face - this happens in all types of interviews whether it be a job or med school. Would they eventually make a good doctor? Probably not. But in the moment, the interviewer could think he/she makes an amazing physicians. Remember they got through 1 gate, but not the 2nd gate, being residency. I have known an individual who got into med school, being arrogant and lying his way through to an acceptance...but where did he ended up? Being rejected from all the residency positions he applied to.  
    Also, I am going to bring up sociological factors here. Socioeconomic status differences provide different levels of thinking often with low SES being more empathetic due to the personal experiences they experience themselves - this could also mean that they are more aware and react more emotionally on what's going on around them. At times, this may or may not be the best for interviews as many distractors can be thrown your way to phase you out. Also, at the interview stage, I commonly believe those from the admission committee from a high SES background will never TRULY and FULLY understand what these people go through. I really do advocate for more diversity in the process - having members of the committee being from a low SES background, on a panel and/or a few MMI stations. I have literally met a few practicing doctors, both younger and older,  who have dismissed cultural factors and made indirect racial comments towards my family for seeking medical care - these physicians were simply culturally incompetent and rude.
    Luckily, med admissions is starting to notice the trend in their admissions. Although, we will likely not see a significant change immediately in the doctor population, we are gradually shifting towards a better approach with expected change in the distant future. 
  13. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from -D- in A flawed process?   
    Read up Marsha Barber's article written in 2016: https://www.universityaffairs.ca/features/feature-article/medical-school-admissions-process-skewed/. Some of your points do align with her article and how she saw the process unfold for her son. 

    I also want to say that every year, med schools get great applicants but unfortunately not everyone can get through. Many factors are outside the applicant's control as well. Despite Canada in great need for primary care, the federal and provincial governments are limiting (and also looking to cut) down on educational and occupational funding for healthcare. The result? A reduction in employment, reduction in residency spots, a CAPPING of MD seats due to limited residency spots...the spiral chain continues further down. 

    In regards to "people who you thought would get in and those who you thought wouldn't ended up getting in", I found that people who were often (for a lack of a better word), ARROGANT, were the one's who tend to show more confidence in their interview skills. Once you get to the interview stage, it's all about being confident in who you are and being to portray yourself and again "gaming" the system. Some people are good at lying at interviews and about their experiences with a straight face - this happens in all types of interviews whether it be a job or med school. Would they eventually make a good doctor? Probably not. But in the moment, the interviewer could think he/she makes an amazing physicians. Remember they got through 1 gate, but not the 2nd gate, being residency. I have known an individual who got into med school, being arrogant and lying his way through to an acceptance...but where did he ended up? Being rejected from all the residency positions he applied to.  
    Also, I am going to bring up sociological factors here. Socioeconomic status differences provide different levels of thinking often with low SES being more empathetic due to the personal experiences they experience themselves - this could also mean that they are more aware and react more emotionally on what's going on around them. At times, this may or may not be the best for interviews as many distractors can be thrown your way to phase you out. Also, at the interview stage, I commonly believe those from the admission committee from a high SES background will never TRULY and FULLY understand what these people go through. I really do advocate for more diversity in the process - having members of the committee being from a low SES background, on a panel and/or a few MMI stations. I have literally met a few practicing doctors, both younger and older,  who have dismissed cultural factors and made indirect racial comments towards my family for seeking medical care - these physicians were simply culturally incompetent and rude.
    Luckily, med admissions is starting to notice the trend in their admissions. Although, we will likely not see a significant change immediately in the doctor population, we are gradually shifting towards a better approach with expected change in the distant future. 
  14. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from Bambi in Extracurriculars?   
    Agreed to what Bambi said above. Derailing the topic a little because I believe this needs to be said. IMHO, often times, many students compare themselves to others since an earlier age, they were often compared to a sibling, family friends, etc by members of their inner circle. As you grow older and mature, you start to realize the amount of energy spent on worrying for others could have been use to improving your own success - the earlier you realize it, the better. Ironically, being in a field to ensure safety and care needs for others, you'll need to worry and care for yourself first before you can ensure that you can perform to the best of your ability for others.
  15. Thanks
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from CoffeeOtter in Took 4 courses in one year. Will Ottawa count it?   
    Yes that's fine. If you complete at least 3 years towards a bachelor's degree with a minimum of 4 courses per semester in those years and where the missing credits is coming from summer courses (doesn't matter which summer is taken in) or another academic year you'll be eligible. 
  16. Thanks
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from teriyakisauce in WGPA and the FCEs   
    Yes, that is correct. On top of that, if there is a significant GPA difference from your 1st vs. 2nd degree (given that your 1st degree didn't meet GPA requirements), you can also write an academic explanation essay to request special consideration to use only your second degree.
  17. Thanks
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from dryorku in .   
    You could also get to know your community more, especially those in vulnerable populations such as youth, elderly, indigenous, etc. Downtown Toronto is populated with not-for-profit organizations that are constantly seeking helpers - e.g. with food insecurity increasing, there are quite a few food banks with a shortage on volunteers to aid in the operations for their clients. 
  18. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia reacted to NLengr in Ontario's 53 extra residency spots   
    I would make sure I was happy with community ANYWHERE in the country. If you aren't, pick something that will let you stay in your preferred location. A job is a job. Friends and family are really what makes your life happy. 
  19. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia reacted to Intrepid86 in Study tips?   
    I skimmed over CardiacArrhythmia's tips and think they're pretty good. The foundation of effective studying is discipline and spaced repetition, and holds true whether you're in undergrad, med school, or residency. However, it's important to make sure what you're doing actually works, and that you're not simply going through the motions.
    If you've been taught new material just a few days before the test, then the approach differs depending on who you are. For some people, material taught that recently doesn't require extensive revision since it's so fresh in their minds. Personally though, if a lecture was taught on Thursday and being tested Monday, then I would still make sure to have gone through it at least 3 times (therefore once daily) beforehand. It's the same amount of effort as other lectures, but all upfront. Some things simply need to be brute forced when there's so little time. The other thing is to clarify questions you have asap, because complex material still needs to be understood.
  20. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia reacted to rmorelan in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    I have always been a bit torn when talking about this subject - and the longer I have been in the game the greater appreciation I seem to develop for multiple approaches - many of which are at least somewhat contradictory. That is some what annoying as I have been trying for over a decade to help people get into medical school ha. I would like to think that isn't a bad thing to be doing. 
    Is medicine a job, career, or calling? obviously it is different things to different people - you can be a competent even great doctor in any of those classes. The more it is close to a passionate vocation the more likely I have found your patients and colleagues to enjoy working with you and in some cases you may get better outcomes but that is highly variable. All three groups are vulnerable to burn out - some of the most passionate people in the field are hit the hardest when they don't go well or they cannot contribute as much as they want. 
    There is also a problem with frame of reference. I was a professional software engineer prior to medicine - and like other in this thread I push, fought, even clawed my way to the top of my area to master my craft. That took 80+ hour weeks, all nighters at times, and general sacrifice.  Doctors work hard but I haven't run into many successful people in anything that haven't worked hard - often much harder than people realized. (as an example all the you should have gone into finance to make money people seem to gloss over the fact that those jobs are horrible - and mostly horrible as well over the exact same period of youth that medicine is over). It is rare for people to do more than one of these high intensity career pathways so it is hard for people to compare things - but as you already know there are a ton of people out there working really hard, and medicine doesn't have a lock on that. 
    Should you back up if aiming for medicine? Using pure logic I would have to say yes - simply the majority of people trying for it don't get in so having something stand on seems logical. The only issue with that is that psychologically speaking every time you give yourself a back up you also weaken you effort towards the primary goal. That has popped out many times in the psych literature and I have seen that in medicine. A lot of the most successful people out there didn't have a back up - they win big or fail hard. I still say on the balance backing up is the right approach - but to be honest I was more of the latter type and just the sort of person that can go to those extremes even if not logical. 
    I can speak to my personal take on things. I enjoy what I do and I love the possibility of having an impact on people lives the field offers. I work with smart skilled people every day who are trying to change the entire field.  It really is an honour and a privilege to help people who are often at their worst - and when you are right and make a difference it is simply amazing. yet it isn't a perfect job, and the hype is so extreme almost nothing could live up to it. You won't help everyone you come across either because you cannot or they don't want to. You can love the subject matter but at some point you will know the material pretty cold - are you still as excited about it at that point? You will work much harder than most - and other in yourself may have difficult with that balance even while you are trying to get through it. Depending on the field there are location restrictions, lifestyle restrictions, and even obtaining a job in the first place restrictions as well. You may not get everything you want and be way too far into the process to do anything about it when that happens. With all that in mind you will obtain in medicine a job that in almost any objective sense is extremely good relative to most other fields - if you are smart with that you can take care of yourself/family in great comfort and have tremendous perks along the way . You will do and see things that most people cannot imagine doing and that is a fact. 
    You will notice that often the people less "shiny" about medicine are those that clerks or beyond - this is simply because prior to that point medicine is amazing ha - no downside has shown up yet. Pre-clerkship is easier than undergrads where you are trying to get extreme GPA, and you have more certainty in your future, riding the high of getting in, supported financially, and have a ton of freedom and surrounded by friends. It is a special and amazing time - enjoy it while you go through. Clerks on the other hand get hammered with often truly the first really loss of control in many people adult lives - you work when and where they tell you do with no say in the matter, you are isolated from your class - and you will work hard and you work long days and nights - with stress of CARMS ever present.  Residency is more of the same but worse - and now we are going on 4-7 years of that so it becomes routine capping off with an entire year of exam prep of an intensity you just cannot understand until you do it (and that is a good thing because you don't want to scare people). Long process - if doctors get respect it is because they had to get through it and thus earned that respect. What we don't have on the forum is a lot of doctors 5 years say into practise to tell us what it is like on the other side of that hump - when the student loans are paid off, and practise set up and the number of hours closer to human levels. When you look back and see where you stand, would it be worth it? I like to think so but I will have to see ha. 
    Like others on the forum I would say really look into whether this field is right for you - don't do some knee jerk reaction to go into it without introspection. There are way too many people that have done that and they are not happy people. Those that get it right - well when the match is good these are some of the happiest people I know. Personally I believe I made the right choice and if I had to do it again I would.
  21. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from striders02 in Are Ontario medical school acceptances conditional? If so, what is the condition?   
    Yes it goes by the academic year GPA, not course-specific.
  22. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from striders02 in Are Ontario medical school acceptances conditional? If so, what is the condition?   
    School dependent. Western requires you to maintain at least a 3.7 GPA in your current year if you only had 1 year previously eligible. Ottawa requires you to maintain the cut-off GPA for your current year, so 3.85 for Ontario and 3.87 for OOP. So if you’re applying to all Ontario schools, I suggest you use the Ottawa cut-off GPA  as your measuring stick for your final year.
  23. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from RoninCDN in Retaking a Course?   
    1. No do not retake it IF you're only planning on applying to Saskatchewan since they'll look at both courses if they fall within your UAA calculations.  Power through the rest of the courses and ace the MCAT. 
    2. Is this orgo 1 or 2? If this is orgo 1, then you have a chance to reevaluate yourself and continue with orgo 2. Ottawa requires at least a minimum B (3.0/4.0 OMSAS) in prerequisites, including a combination of chemistry courses, including orgo. McGill has orgo in both options 1 and 2 and prerequisite grades can play a large part during post-interview selections.
  24. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from SweetNothing in Opting out of Turnitin   
    Only BPEs are put through turnitin. Your ABS essays are a part of the overall ABS review. 
  25. Like
    CardiacArrhythmia got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Advice and opinions wanted: Masters degree - Pharmacology   
    Well a course-based masters can give you small bonus points at mac and it can make up a GPA year for Calgary. Unfortunately, it's likely that UofT won't give you that grad review. So really, there's not really much benefit for admissions, but hey, sometimes applicant only need that little push to be interviewed and, if lucky, accepted. 

    I think you should look at the course-based masters as if it is something you really want to do and how it will apply to your future career - I wouldn't throw your finances out if it really no purpose for 1) your future career or 2) your alternative path.

    As for common knockdown on course-based masters, sure they might not have a strong relevance for MD applications compared to thesis based, but depending on whether you lean towards academic or private practice, course-based masters can still provide benefits of improving both your clinical practice and/or job employment (a.k.a. MPH).
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