Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Sisushi

Members
  • Content Count

    60
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from aspiringdoctor109 in Having regrets...   
    If it helps I did exactly what you described. Left my home school and town where I knew everyone, knew the system, enjoyed the clinics, had my family and partner. Moved across the country to the coast where I had one friend 5hrs away. It was my top choice on rank list. There's pros and cons. Was my entire training rosy? Not at all. I loved the adventure, loved the new scenery and culture. But culture shock was real, homesickness was real, and it is really freaking hard to make friends in a new place, particularly a small town. I had some of the worst times of my life in residency, but also some of the best. I'm now moving back to my home area for a locum and, as another poster said, locuming can give you a lot of flexibility. Go locum in BC after if that's something you really enjoy. Moving out by myself to a new grand adventure wasn't exactly Hollywood perfect, shall we say. Ups and downs just like real life. 
    The path not taken is always greener by comparison. I think about how I would still be in the same relationship, have my old apartment, have more time with my family, actually see my friends, and probably be more established/better connected in my career than I am now flinging myself back and forth across the country. But I guarantee if I stayed at my home school I would have been bothered by not going on the big adventure, not taking the risk. 
    So long and short of it is pros and cons, you may have loved BC, you may have hated BC. You may end up spending your life in a big city or you may work 3 mths there and say "eff that". There's still lots of time for adventures and making big country-wide moves. For now celebrate that you matched to your second choice!
  2. Thanks
    Sisushi got a reaction from reation in anyone in FM at MUN (St. John's) - please help!   
    Am resident in St. John's, did central stream but I know eastern and nunafam on a basic level. 
    St. John's is a great city - I love it. It's got some city amenities with a small town feel. Rent isn't crazy. Driving is a bit intimidating (we got hills on hills and staircases cut into sidewalks because you'll never get up the hill otherwise) but you get used to it. Not a lot of skyscrapers, so good views are easy to come by. I get a view of the ocean and downtown from a 4th floor apartment. Weather is a bit temperamental, but so are a lot of coastal areas. Windy, rainy, but when it's good it's gorgeous. 15-30mins gets you to some world class hiking. 1-3hrs gets you to backcountry hiking. Food options can be limited if you're used to a more diverse and bigger food scene, but we've got sushi, we got half-decent Chinese, more fish and chips than you can shake at and some things in between. It's no downtown Toronto but you won't go hungry. If you're looking for specialized things it can be a bit expensive because you're on the island and everything is shipped in. Culture is pretty relaxed. Especially pre-covid, wasn't rare for people to casually strike up conversation on the street. Smaller towns everyone waves when you're driving by. Newfoundland doesn't really feel like the rest of Canada IMO, it's like a different country. Accent can be an issue outside of St. John's. In central I solidly thought people were having strokes but that's just the local dialect. You pick up on it fast, you also start to call patients 'my ducky' 'my darling' 'my love' real fast because it's part of a lot of people's culture and it's what they call you; I kind of love it. 
    I haven't personally experienced Nunafam, but I hear great things. A lot of people from my year, whether they trained there or not, signed on to Nunavut. You actually spend all but 6mths of your training in St. John's. I hear the internet can be a bit rough out there, but didn't stop anyone from my year with netflix, at least. I hear the staff are awesome, very collegial, and if you want to be one of the guns-blazing-can-do-anything all around physicians who can go ER to clinic to deliveries then it's the place for you. A lot of independence from what I hear. Honestly if I had a go-again I would go Nunafam. Iqualuit isn't really a city the way you would think a province's major city but if aurora borealis is enough of a draw for you I hear/see photos and they're right outside your window. If you do get to go to Nunavut - would you ever have had the chance otherwise? It can be an adventure. 
    In terms of the program itself it's very variable. Goose bay for example is basically its own entity with very little similar to the rest of the streams. Eastern rural stream (burin) is not the same as someone at, say, HSC family practice unit smack in town. Even in central, Gander was different from Grand Falls even though they're only an hour apart on the highway and the physicians overlap. I met some of the best and worst physicians I've ever known in Newfoundland. The good ones are amazing, the less good ones are...disheartening. Eastern has a much more academic focused schedule, the rural streams are very flexible and a little DIY. Research I would say isn't as strong as, say, UofT, but Newfoundland has its own challenges that requires different skillsets to face. 
    Overall, it'll probably be a little culture shock. It's a little expensive on the island, the summers are kind of cool, the winters can be harsh, but I'm devastated I'm leaving the province after 3 years here. It grows on you. There's no where else like Newfoundland, and that's the truth. 
  3. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from ihsh in Having regrets...   
    If it helps I did exactly what you described. Left my home school and town where I knew everyone, knew the system, enjoyed the clinics, had my family and partner. Moved across the country to the coast where I had one friend 5hrs away. It was my top choice on rank list. There's pros and cons. Was my entire training rosy? Not at all. I loved the adventure, loved the new scenery and culture. But culture shock was real, homesickness was real, and it is really freaking hard to make friends in a new place, particularly a small town. I had some of the worst times of my life in residency, but also some of the best. I'm now moving back to my home area for a locum and, as another poster said, locuming can give you a lot of flexibility. Go locum in BC after if that's something you really enjoy. Moving out by myself to a new grand adventure wasn't exactly Hollywood perfect, shall we say. Ups and downs just like real life. 
    The path not taken is always greener by comparison. I think about how I would still be in the same relationship, have my old apartment, have more time with my family, actually see my friends, and probably be more established/better connected in my career than I am now flinging myself back and forth across the country. But I guarantee if I stayed at my home school I would have been bothered by not going on the big adventure, not taking the risk. 
    So long and short of it is pros and cons, you may have loved BC, you may have hated BC. You may end up spending your life in a big city or you may work 3 mths there and say "eff that". There's still lots of time for adventures and making big country-wide moves. For now celebrate that you matched to your second choice!
  4. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from frenchpress in anyone in FM at MUN (St. John's) - please help!   
    Am resident in St. John's, did central stream but I know eastern and nunafam on a basic level. 
    St. John's is a great city - I love it. It's got some city amenities with a small town feel. Rent isn't crazy. Driving is a bit intimidating (we got hills on hills and staircases cut into sidewalks because you'll never get up the hill otherwise) but you get used to it. Not a lot of skyscrapers, so good views are easy to come by. I get a view of the ocean and downtown from a 4th floor apartment. Weather is a bit temperamental, but so are a lot of coastal areas. Windy, rainy, but when it's good it's gorgeous. 15-30mins gets you to some world class hiking. 1-3hrs gets you to backcountry hiking. Food options can be limited if you're used to a more diverse and bigger food scene, but we've got sushi, we got half-decent Chinese, more fish and chips than you can shake at and some things in between. It's no downtown Toronto but you won't go hungry. If you're looking for specialized things it can be a bit expensive because you're on the island and everything is shipped in. Culture is pretty relaxed. Especially pre-covid, wasn't rare for people to casually strike up conversation on the street. Smaller towns everyone waves when you're driving by. Newfoundland doesn't really feel like the rest of Canada IMO, it's like a different country. Accent can be an issue outside of St. John's. In central I solidly thought people were having strokes but that's just the local dialect. You pick up on it fast, you also start to call patients 'my ducky' 'my darling' 'my love' real fast because it's part of a lot of people's culture and it's what they call you; I kind of love it. 
    I haven't personally experienced Nunafam, but I hear great things. A lot of people from my year, whether they trained there or not, signed on to Nunavut. You actually spend all but 6mths of your training in St. John's. I hear the internet can be a bit rough out there, but didn't stop anyone from my year with netflix, at least. I hear the staff are awesome, very collegial, and if you want to be one of the guns-blazing-can-do-anything all around physicians who can go ER to clinic to deliveries then it's the place for you. A lot of independence from what I hear. Honestly if I had a go-again I would go Nunafam. Iqualuit isn't really a city the way you would think a province's major city but if aurora borealis is enough of a draw for you I hear/see photos and they're right outside your window. If you do get to go to Nunavut - would you ever have had the chance otherwise? It can be an adventure. 
    In terms of the program itself it's very variable. Goose bay for example is basically its own entity with very little similar to the rest of the streams. Eastern rural stream (burin) is not the same as someone at, say, HSC family practice unit smack in town. Even in central, Gander was different from Grand Falls even though they're only an hour apart on the highway and the physicians overlap. I met some of the best and worst physicians I've ever known in Newfoundland. The good ones are amazing, the less good ones are...disheartening. Eastern has a much more academic focused schedule, the rural streams are very flexible and a little DIY. Research I would say isn't as strong as, say, UofT, but Newfoundland has its own challenges that requires different skillsets to face. 
    Overall, it'll probably be a little culture shock. It's a little expensive on the island, the summers are kind of cool, the winters can be harsh, but I'm devastated I'm leaving the province after 3 years here. It grows on you. There's no where else like Newfoundland, and that's the truth. 
  5. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from frenchpress in Having regrets...   
    If it helps I did exactly what you described. Left my home school and town where I knew everyone, knew the system, enjoyed the clinics, had my family and partner. Moved across the country to the coast where I had one friend 5hrs away. It was my top choice on rank list. There's pros and cons. Was my entire training rosy? Not at all. I loved the adventure, loved the new scenery and culture. But culture shock was real, homesickness was real, and it is really freaking hard to make friends in a new place, particularly a small town. I had some of the worst times of my life in residency, but also some of the best. I'm now moving back to my home area for a locum and, as another poster said, locuming can give you a lot of flexibility. Go locum in BC after if that's something you really enjoy. Moving out by myself to a new grand adventure wasn't exactly Hollywood perfect, shall we say. Ups and downs just like real life. 
    The path not taken is always greener by comparison. I think about how I would still be in the same relationship, have my old apartment, have more time with my family, actually see my friends, and probably be more established/better connected in my career than I am now flinging myself back and forth across the country. But I guarantee if I stayed at my home school I would have been bothered by not going on the big adventure, not taking the risk. 
    So long and short of it is pros and cons, you may have loved BC, you may have hated BC. You may end up spending your life in a big city or you may work 3 mths there and say "eff that". There's still lots of time for adventures and making big country-wide moves. For now celebrate that you matched to your second choice!
  6. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from frenchpress in Family Medicine + Anesthesia or Addiction Medicine   
    Am in a "soft" +1, as in not regulated or licensed like +1 EM. Evaluate how much you enjoy the kinds of work and do your +1 based on that. I know EM has better lifestyle for some people but I hate the ER. I have nightmares after every ER shift about something I forgot to do, or should have asked. I will happily never do an ER shift again in my life. Other friends of mine think clinic grates their nerves to shreds and would live in the ER, so +1 was pretty good for them. +1 in anesthesia as someone else said can be limiting, I believe a lot of bigger city hospitals would be harder to work at compared to smaller and rural places, partially because there are full 5yr anesthesiologists in bigger centers. 
    The soft +1s don't tend to come with a huge paycheck jump. I did it because it's an area that I'm interested in and want to be more comfortable doing. I don't intend to narrow my scope to just this +1 area but I just wanted more comfort with this extra challenging area. I may have 1-2 clinic days dedicated to this interest but it would still be family practice patients, so not really earning more money. Just an extra year of resident pay LOL 
  7. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from _gettingthere_ in Having regrets...   
    If it helps I did exactly what you described. Left my home school and town where I knew everyone, knew the system, enjoyed the clinics, had my family and partner. Moved across the country to the coast where I had one friend 5hrs away. It was my top choice on rank list. There's pros and cons. Was my entire training rosy? Not at all. I loved the adventure, loved the new scenery and culture. But culture shock was real, homesickness was real, and it is really freaking hard to make friends in a new place, particularly a small town. I had some of the worst times of my life in residency, but also some of the best. I'm now moving back to my home area for a locum and, as another poster said, locuming can give you a lot of flexibility. Go locum in BC after if that's something you really enjoy. Moving out by myself to a new grand adventure wasn't exactly Hollywood perfect, shall we say. Ups and downs just like real life. 
    The path not taken is always greener by comparison. I think about how I would still be in the same relationship, have my old apartment, have more time with my family, actually see my friends, and probably be more established/better connected in my career than I am now flinging myself back and forth across the country. But I guarantee if I stayed at my home school I would have been bothered by not going on the big adventure, not taking the risk. 
    So long and short of it is pros and cons, you may have loved BC, you may have hated BC. You may end up spending your life in a big city or you may work 3 mths there and say "eff that". There's still lots of time for adventures and making big country-wide moves. For now celebrate that you matched to your second choice!
  8. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from snapesnapeseverussnape in McMaster MMI: Speaking for the *whole* 8 minutes?   
    I was one of the interviewers for Mac back in 2017, my advice may be a little dated now so take with a grain of salt. 
    My station was one that came frontloaded with a long answer. The best applicants I found spoke for about 4mins or so, gave me their opening argument, reasons why they supported that, reasons why they don't support the other side of the argument, then conclusion. I had prompting questions that I could ask if they didn't already cover it in their answer. 
    To be honest, people who gave me everything including answers to the prompting questions up front was difficult to follow. When someone talks straight for 8 mins I tended to lose their main argument. So answer the question as asked, support your answer. We will give you the prompting questions with the remaining time. 
  9. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from frenchpress in What is considered "rural"?   
    Rural is very exciting! I won't lie, the pressure can be immense and the isolation is real. Especially if you go alone without a partner/family, it can be hard to make friends when everyone is a patient. Dating in small rural areas is a virtual no go. The work can be quite taxing. The pay in some areas is actually less than urban areas due to a lot of factors. I would say the thing that really makes rural worth it is how much you love that kind of medicine, and the collegiality that is much rarer is larger settings. When there's only 5 docs and 1 nurse for 2hrs around, and struggle together with the lack of resources, you really bond! 
  10. Thanks
    Sisushi got a reaction from Limes in What is considered "rural"?   
    A little late on the reply! 
    Rural is very much up to people's definition. If you're specifically thinking of family doctor loan forgiveness, they do dictate based on postal codes what counts as rural. I think the cap is at 20 000 population. It also varies province to province. I did rural family medicine in southern Ontario and still had no less than 7 allergists I could refer to in the region. I went north of Ottawa and about 2hrs north there you can do ER and the family docs did most of the psych side because we didn't have a psychiatrist. 
    I've since been to rural Newfoundland and Labrador. Hoo boy. From Fri-Mon AM I was the only doctor in the hospital. Covered long term care and ER. You do ambulance escourts, air ambulance. You put NG tubes, you do minor procedures, you deliver babies. We handled gunshot wounds and car accidents. Whatever walks in that door is you. My closest tertiary centre was a 7-10hr drive away, weather depending and moose depending. Nearest back up of any sort of hospital with specialists with 2hrs away. If there's a blizzard then forget it. Our family doc on a nearby site once delivered a very complicated and high risk pregnancy because the obgyn's car went into a ditch trying to get to the hospital for it due to snow. These towns ran from 2000 - 8000 population. But a similar sized town in southern Ontario probably won't have these circumstances when there are other major centres nearby. 
    Long and short of it is that it is very region dependent. Southern Ontario rural is not the same as Northern BC rural is not the same as Labrador rural. 
  11. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from hamham in Where to look for job opportunities   
    Speaking from a family medicine perspective: people were throwing job offers at us during relevant conferences like FMF. Most recruiters will get your email and send any upcoming job opportunities as well. I don't know how competitive yet (PGY2) but I kept in touch with places I enjoyed electives in through clerkship and some are sending out offers, so that might be a way, too?
  12. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from doc_tr in Matched into my 8th choice   
    LOL! Hello from Newfoundland rural family resident! Fortunately I came here by choice hahaha. 
    That said, going to a place you didn't want to is pretty brutal. But important to remember that residency is a time limited business and, to be honest, most of the time you're circulating in the hospital. Even if it's not where you want to go, a lot of programs are very negotiable about getting you additional learning opportunities that you need.
    OP: At this point. since you've already matched, I think the best/only thing to do is chin up, get through the first year of residency, and keep an open mind. If you find during it that you're just plain miserable where you are, look into transferring and prepare your connections early before carms next year. 
    *Plug for rural family in NL: it's kind of really awesome! 
  13. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from LB_2019 in Matched into my 8th choice   
    LOL! Hello from Newfoundland rural family resident! Fortunately I came here by choice hahaha. 
    That said, going to a place you didn't want to is pretty brutal. But important to remember that residency is a time limited business and, to be honest, most of the time you're circulating in the hospital. Even if it's not where you want to go, a lot of programs are very negotiable about getting you additional learning opportunities that you need.
    OP: At this point. since you've already matched, I think the best/only thing to do is chin up, get through the first year of residency, and keep an open mind. If you find during it that you're just plain miserable where you are, look into transferring and prepare your connections early before carms next year. 
    *Plug for rural family in NL: it's kind of really awesome! 
  14. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from ChemPetE in Matched into my 8th choice   
    LOL! Hello from Newfoundland rural family resident! Fortunately I came here by choice hahaha. 
    That said, going to a place you didn't want to is pretty brutal. But important to remember that residency is a time limited business and, to be honest, most of the time you're circulating in the hospital. Even if it's not where you want to go, a lot of programs are very negotiable about getting you additional learning opportunities that you need.
    OP: At this point. since you've already matched, I think the best/only thing to do is chin up, get through the first year of residency, and keep an open mind. If you find during it that you're just plain miserable where you are, look into transferring and prepare your connections early before carms next year. 
    *Plug for rural family in NL: it's kind of really awesome! 
  15. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from polarbear123 in Matched into my 8th choice   
    LOL! Hello from Newfoundland rural family resident! Fortunately I came here by choice hahaha. 
    That said, going to a place you didn't want to is pretty brutal. But important to remember that residency is a time limited business and, to be honest, most of the time you're circulating in the hospital. Even if it's not where you want to go, a lot of programs are very negotiable about getting you additional learning opportunities that you need.
    OP: At this point. since you've already matched, I think the best/only thing to do is chin up, get through the first year of residency, and keep an open mind. If you find during it that you're just plain miserable where you are, look into transferring and prepare your connections early before carms next year. 
    *Plug for rural family in NL: it's kind of really awesome! 
  16. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from Belle_MD in Favourite Fam Med electives   
    If you're at all interested in full spectrum family med or rural family med, I highly recommend Petawawa under Ottawa's outreach for an elective. Best 4 weeks of my learning, amazing preceptors and you're the only student, so 5 staff teaching one student. Plus housing is supplied.
  17. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from 116E118 in Unable To Upload Osap Documents   
    Is anyone having an issue where for both the declaration and masters student forms it says 'no action required', but on the checklist it says for me to upload supporting documents? I don't have a button to even open the documents let alone print them. So, so confused. 
  18. Like
    Sisushi reacted to Arztin in Suicide Of A Resident In Montreal   
    Huh? I only said people in general (not just healthcare professionals) need to be made more aware of these problems + seek help when needed, especially if in distress or psychiatric problem. 
    I did not suggest anything else. I did not dismiss what happened because of her psychiatric issues, nor was I being cynical towards a colleague who commited suicide. I honestly think you misunderstood what I wrote and felt offended for no reason.
    And yes, I do agree that we should pay attention + take care of colleagues who need help.
  19. Like
    Sisushi reacted to bearded frog in For Them Waitlisters   
    They accept more students than have spots, the number being based on previous years data of students who they accept and choose a different school. That being said there is still a solid number of people who get in off the waitlist (me included) so don't give up hope. It seems like the class fills up by the end of the first week of June though.
  20. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from lacigolonummI in So You're Going To Be A Uofc Med Student..   
    If anyone is from out of province, maybe you can share how the adjustment was?
     
    I'm coming from Ontario and have been to Calgary exactly once for my interview, where I went from hotel to school. Is it difficult to acclimatize to tge weather? Driving?
     
    What about transfering documents, did you keep permanent addresses at home or your new calgary one?
     
    I'm so worried about all these paperwork things, and leaving my really good friends and boyfriend. I'm afraid of being lonely I guess x_x
  21. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from Tacrolimus in Accepted/Waitlisted/Rejected??   
    Accepted!
     
     
    !! I'm so excited I keep thinking it's fake and they'll take it back

    GPA: 4.00

    MCAT: 11 verbal, pretty crap everything else

    EC: 7 years hospital volunteering, some musical/other faculty art related stuff, two poster publications with WHO, pretty average overall

    Interview: felt it went good for most, definitely a few that made me want to bash my head on the desk for blabbering
     
    Graduated 2014 OOP
  22. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from kevojy in April 20Th Support Thread   
    So...if we haven't heard does that mean rejected?
  23. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from pneumophiliac in April 20Th Support Thread   
    Is anyone else just not sleeping? I'm doing dishes out of anxiety. At least the kitchen will be clean
  24. Like
    Sisushi got a reaction from sael in Calgary Interview Discussion 2015   
    Will anyone be in Calgary a few days early (26th/27th) around Holiday Inn Express that want to meet up and practice/soothe each other's nerves? A little nervous about travelling by myself (terrified out of my mind of flying). Or we can just get dinner together and have a buddy to find our way around if we're both OOP? On that note, if anyone's flying out of Toronto on the 26th, maybe we're on the same flight!
  25. Like
    Sisushi reacted to Tacrolimus in Calgary Interview Discussion 2015   
    I booked Holiday Inn Express. It seems like a really nice hotel (from the pictures and reviews), and it's only ~2 km away from Health Sciences Centre. Free breakfast too! Also, it was cheaper than Hotel Alma by ~$10. 
×
×
  • Create New...