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RichardHammond

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  1. Thanks
    RichardHammond got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Thank you emails after interviews. Do you send them or not?   
    Unnecessary IMO.
  2. Like
    RichardHammond got a reaction from Tullius in MCCQE Part 1 Thoughts   
    Mean score is 250, SD is 30, passing score is 226. Assuming normal distribution, pass rate should be around ~80%.
    Also echoing others in saying the exam was horribly designed. Ambiguous questions, vague prompts, etc.
    Even the MCCQE website has errors. For example, they say you have 1 minute 14 seconds per MCQ, which is incorrect (Should be 240 minutes / 210 questions = 1.14 min = 1 minute 8 seconds). Sounds trivial but you will be 19 minutes over if you follow their info. They made the same mistake again talking about CDM timing.
     
  3. Like
    RichardHammond got a reaction from conditional knockout in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    When deciding on a specialty, be careful not to confuse your excitement with getting to do new things as your calling to a particular specialty. For example, on your emerg rotation your staff will be like "have you ever sutured before? no? go try on that dude's face" and you'll feel like a badass cowboy and think emerg is your calling. But 20 years into your career, you will not find half the things that excited you in medical school remotely interesting. Instead, try to see parts of a specialty you hate because they often don't go away or even get worse (e.g. call requirements, shift work, etc.)
    Lots of good advice from others above. +1 for the following:
    Form a good friends/social circle Try to get exposure early on to different specialties before clerkship Think about CaRMS EARLY Start research/gunner activities early if you're even remotely thinking about something competitive. Otherwise, enjoy your summers.
  4. Like
    RichardHammond got a reaction from dh. in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    When deciding on a specialty, be careful not to confuse your excitement with getting to do new things as your calling to a particular specialty. For example, on your emerg rotation your staff will be like "have you ever sutured before? no? go try on that dude's face" and you'll feel like a badass cowboy and think emerg is your calling. But 20 years into your career, you will not find half the things that excited you in medical school remotely interesting. Instead, try to see parts of a specialty you hate because they often don't go away or even get worse (e.g. call requirements, shift work, etc.)
    Lots of good advice from others above. +1 for the following:
    Form a good friends/social circle Try to get exposure early on to different specialties before clerkship Think about CaRMS EARLY Start research/gunner activities early if you're even remotely thinking about something competitive. Otherwise, enjoy your summers.
  5. Haha
    RichardHammond got a reaction from hijkl in .   
    Doesn't sound like an unreasonable rule, especially if they want to help candidates be more concise and avoid running out of time. I cannot think of many questions or scenarios, especially in a traditional-style interviews, where one should be speaking for more than 4 minutes. Why waste time say lot word when few word do trick?
  6. Like
    RichardHammond reacted to 1D7 in .   
    Didn't you make a very similar thread last year? lol
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    RichardHammond reacted to freewheeler in .   
    Let us know what the beaches in the caribbean are like
  8. Haha
    RichardHammond reacted to Instagrammar in TD Student Line of Credit Amazon Offer   
    With a 325 M line of credit, I think this will really augment the self-care aspect of medical school. We can all agree that every student needs their own private jet and yacht to succeed #self-care. Right now, I just could not picture taking anything less than 400 million for my line of credit, but with the 500$ Amazon card, I am tempted to settle for a lowly 325 million LOC. I guess the penthouse I wanted will just need to wait. 
  9. Like
    RichardHammond reacted to ATG4B in 3yr vs 4yr finances - What would you do?   
    For anyone who was curious, I was offered UBC (VFMP) and have accepted!  Thanks to everyone for all your input, it really did help make my decision a lot easier. 
  10. Like
    RichardHammond reacted to #YOLO in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    if u can tolerate fm...theres no reason to do anything else
  11. Sad
    RichardHammond reacted to Dr. Tenma in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Well I'm just going to go ahead and post this, likely my final post on this site with an account from 2012 lol. 
    Result: Rejected
    Early or Regular Deadline: Regular
    Timestamp: I don't want to look at it again LOL
    AGPA: 85.1%
    MCAT: 513- 128/126/129/130
    NAQ: 34.11
    TFR: 56.60
    Interview: Below average
    Year: BSC. 2015
    Geography: IP 

    This is my 4th application and 2nd interview. 

    Interview:

    I thought it went really well. I was confident, calm, and professional. I felt 4 stations went excellent, 4 were good and 2 could have been better (maybe rambled a bit?) but nothing bad. I thought there was potential for a above average score, and I would've been fine with a average score as well, its a step up....but I never thought I'd get below average. Everyone I practiced with, including doctors, residents, other applicants and medical students I practiced with extensively...are shocked. I did roughly 250-300 hours of actual practice with these people and 20-30 hours of research on my own and in groups on topics we thought would come up in the interview, and they did, and i was very well prepared. 

    I've reflected on it and I have no idea how this could've been possible. My only explanation is that I simply do not have the demeanor or personality they are looking for. The fact is that I am not an extroverted super outgoing and talkative person. I cannot smile while I speak and I cannot speak as eloquently as others. 
    I cannot be someone I am not, I am simply me. I cannot pretend to be Mr. mega extrovert who goes skiing every weekend while slurping coffee and his Facebook is filled with rock climbing photos with friends and laughs HAHAHAHA at every god damn thing for no reason with perfect white teeth. This is what they want or at least someone who can pretend to be this person. Although I did laugh with the interviewers and two even complimented me and I really connected with them...I still got a below average interview. There is an inherent bias in this process in being a likable person at first impression and I am probably not that person. At least based on my reflections so far, I cannot fathom another reason why I got below average. If I only knew why, I would do my best to improve but I do not so this is my conclusion based on the little data I am given. I know two other people with similar personalities and demeanor as myself, with 90%+ gpa and 515+ mcats that have been rejected over 4 times post interview...and guess what...they have very similar personalities to mine and their interviewing is actually excellent in organization and content in my opinion and those of others. Oh and despite hundreds of hours of volunteering added since my previous interview 2 years ago, and several new positions and projects i've been working on....my NAQ remains the same. I mean this is getting pretty stupid. 
    So although I will apply again (since there's nothing to really lose at this point), this is over. There's no hope left and I know when to give up. I cannot commit like this again practicing that much. I need to start another career, perhaps I'll do a trade at BCIT. I cannot continue gambling my life away like this every year while everyone else moves on. But realistically I have no idea what I'm going to do.

    I'm starting to forget why I wanted to become a doctor in the first place. I gambled and lost, and this gamble certainly was not worth it. I'd never advise anyone i their first year to take this path. I could possibly get in if I keep applying for a few years, my stats are not bad and eventually i might get a hang of being a psychopath who can flip their very being 180 degrees but i wonder if its even worth it. 

    I don't blame myself anymore, I don't blame god, I don't blame the interviewers either. I blame the North American Medical school system's broken, outdated and prejudice MMI system. I wonder how many fantastic applicants (which I am not, but my friends who got rejected are) were rejected for potential idiots because they just weren't as sociable. 
  12. Like
    RichardHammond reacted to Neurophiliac in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    After 6 years of applying to UBC Medicine... going through all the possibilities (regrets before interview, to regrets after interview, to regrets after waitlist, to being ineligible for 2 whole years), I seriously cannot believe I'm writing this... It had always seemed like it's something too good to be true, yet here I am.  There are many people I would like to thank (and letting them know will take a solid week) from the bottom of my heart for the support, encouragement, and love they have provided me within this long and incredible journey I have been through.  I write this with shock, excitement, and full of heart.
    TIME STAMP:  11:56 AM PST (May 10, 2019)
    Result:  ACCEPTED VFMP (1st choice) !!  
    Early or Regular Deadline:  Regular Deadline
    GPA or AGPA (if applicable):  ~84%
    MCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB):  514 – (130 / 125 / 130 / 129)
    Current Degree (UG/Bachelors/Masters/PhD):  BSc in 2014
    Geography (IP/OOP):  IP
    Extracurricular Activities (awards, achievements, volunteering, employment, research, etc.):
    I had written this description already in a separate post I made, but will be copying it here as well:  Founded and lead a non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for variety of causes via annual musical concerts, with the last 2 events focused on contributing to schizophrenia (5 years and counting); founded and led another charity aiding developing nations via Save the Children fund (6 years); extensive leadership and volunteering with UBC Department of Physics and Astronomy (8.5 years and counting); long-term ER volunteer and volunteer trainer and program coordinator (8.5 years and counting); long-term St. John Ambulance volunteer and Divisional Administration Officer (2000+ hours over 5 years, and counting); independently provide guidance and support to immigrants and families as they adjust to life in Vancouver/Canada (9+ years and counting); lots and lots of capacity to work with others including skin cancer research/holding workshops for high school students across Metro Vancouver, volunteering with med students and residents via UBC Department of Emergency Medicine, working closely with refugees and youth with physical and/or intellectual disabilities, and more (combined 3300+ hours); and lots and lots of diversity including clinical research as a volunteer, shadowing pediatric surgeons, toxicology research as a volunteer, epigenomics research at Michael Smith Labs, loads of piano and competitions, oil painting, and more.  I also work 3 jobs right now, 1 full-time and 2 part-time jobs; full-time is being a research assistant at UBCH working on a project focused on treatment-refractory schizophrenia (over 2 years); part-time jobs include tutoring students in grade 4-12 in math and academic reading with a company, and also tutoring for the MCAT with a company.  1 Publication (1st author) on the application (had a poster publication/presentation on June 7th which couldn't be included unfortunately, and a few are expected to come soon).  Lots of awards (mainly from high school) and one high performance activity for winning multiple awards with St. John Ambulance.  The intention of this post is to try and help people down the line, so that's why I'm including lots of details.
    Interview:
    I finished my interview initially feeling good about my answers.  I had a terrific interview experience!  I felt each interviewer was well engaged in my responses and discussions; they all smiled and nodded as I was answering questions and follow-ups.  But then the 3-month period started and man oh man oh man was I second-guessing myself... I kept doubting my answers and my confidence started to drop a little bit each week that had passed.  I knew at minimum I did 5/10 stations that I would categorize as "good" and at absolute most 8/10 stations.  But overall, especially leading to D-Day, I was completely unsure how I did, but I don't know if I was being too self-critical or not.  At the end of the day, I still overthought everything haha.  Turned out to be okay I guess!
     
    I would like to sincerely congratulate everyone who received an offer this year and sincerely congratulate in advance those who will be receiving offers from the waitlist!  It's an overwhelmingly amazing feeling that I get a chance to be in class with you folks – I cannot wait to meet each and every one of you as we finally set to make our dreams become a reality .
    For those who didn't receive the news they were hoping for, I can definitely understand how you feel, believe me... Disappointing news can be demoralizing, but let me tell you that you were selected to interview for a reason; you all have incredible potential so please keep your chin held up high and do not allow, even for a single moment, a decision to define who you are.  As my case can further add to the supporting evidence, persistence is absolutely key.
  13. Like
    RichardHammond got a reaction from TrueBlueTenenbaum in How important is it to have a fun personality?   
    While I agree that being reasonably pleasant, competent, respectful is more than enough to get you through most of medical school and even match in the majority of programs, I've heard of more competitive/small programs weighing impression at CaRMS socials more heavily. In those specific situations, I can see how the "cool", "fun" personality would be more memorable and advantageous. But still, a quieter, polite personality would be definitely better than loud, ostentatious personalities. It just might take a bit more work in those situations to be positively memorable.
    Also sometimes, being an engaged listener can help overcome your lack interesting things to say. If you don't have a lot of interests of you own, pretend to be somewhat interested in what other staff/residents are interested in, regardless of how uninterested/unknowledgeable you are about the topic. "wow please tell me more about your crossfit calesthenics paleo intermittent fasting lifestyle you're soooo zen"
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