Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Redpill

Members
  • Content Count

    128
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Redpill reacted to anbessa21 in Why it's important to have a plan B.   
    As a POC in the system, I could not agree more. I find that that race is all-to-often conflated with other factors, be it cultural diversity, or SES.
    I grew up in an upper middle class suburb, far removed from my roots and cultural heritage. Though I appear overtly as a POC, my experiences and culture do not reflect this. I have little extra to offer marginalized and minority patients aside from the actual colour of my skin. I speak nothing but english. I do not know their culture. I have not lived their struggle. Someone of a different ethnic denomination who has underwent similar experiences related to immigration, finances, discrimination etc would have much more to offer ‘my people’ than I would. As much as I’d like to think that schools have moved towards inclusivity and diversity, part of me feels as though they choose those of us who are easiest to assimilate into the existing medical subculture, to be used as political fodder for grandstanding and improved optics.
  2. Like
    Redpill reacted to indefatigable in MOTP Surge 2019   
    There was no surge this year (although many MMTP/MOTP went unfilled)
    https://carms.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360040226811-What-is-the-MOTP-Surge-
  3. Like
    Redpill reacted to MedicineLCS in The privilege of being able to volunteer   
    That makes sense since there is no solution. 
    1. Emphasize GPA - we already know high SES upbringing tends to correlate with higher grades. 
    2. Emphasize MCAT - Same relationship with GPA (although I vaguely recall seeing some article say that admission tests are actually the best way to sort since they're less vulnerable to "knowing the system" like grades are and this makes sense. If someone has high grades they could have been in an easy program, someone with a high MCAT took a universally standardized test). 
    3. Emphasize ECs. Does anyone not think that if medical schools made it clear that work experience was the new 4.0/132 the energy wouldn't go towards this? If, as per the anecdotal example, some people are willing to move provinces at 17/18 I really doubt they're not going to go to find a job if that's the cost of admission. If the high SES student already has an academic advantage they can afford to work more without impacting grades without losing their edge or shift from volunteer>work. Net edge to them still even if it is a good move and benefits the person who had to work. 
    4. Emphasize "life experience/grad degrees". The only people I know taking endless gap years are rich kids (anecdotal evidence notwithstanding). Who is going to be more confident taking on the risk of this approach and constantly reapplying, someone with a bank of mom and dad as a fallback or someone else? If you design a sorting tool to sort out people above a certain income threshold (parental or own) you're going to have to make an incredibly strong argument for such a complete change. When you think of how heavily medicine as a field is tied to a high level of competence in public perception you would have an extremally difficult time convincing everyone to deemphasize these competence based measures and trust your tool instead. Far more likely is the current route of adding low SES streams/rejigging processes to try and level the playing field using traditional measures like GPA/MCAT/CASPer (which is supposedly better for low SES applicants) rather than explicitly drag the high SES kids down, which is far more palatable to most. Even in this system medicine (like every other white collar profession) will still have an abundance of high SES people. 
    This isn't unique to medical school admissions. Kids born to higher SES parents start further ahead, argue if it's nature or nurture, it's the same in every single field I can think of that they would want to chase. Medical school admissions are remarkably equitable in comparison to business fields where "networking" is the name of the game.  Putting on my conflict theorist glasses it's really inevitable that people from better positioned groups will take advantage of this to push their kids ahead, or their kids take advantage for themselves even if their parents don't actively push (who wouldn't want to leverage any advantage to obtain a highly sought after goal?), and people outside that group will think the same. This happens in every single human system. Even in communist countries committed to tearing down hierarchies the families of the ruling elite somehow did better. 
    This isn't a knock on OP's complaints either, more of an observation when this comes up as a venting session. I share their dismay at how "volunteer hours" spent standing around, on phones, or doing very low-impact to no impact activities appear to be valued. However, I do think the tides are turning to recognize that work experience is valuable, and hopefully with time schools change their forms to remove set boxes for "volunteering" and allow more freeform response (ala OMSAS, not UofA "5 volunteering things per category") and that's where some of that advice is coming from, merely trying to satisfy the desire to fill out the whole application. 
  4. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from merci in UBC - Fraser Health Program?   
    My impression was the plan was to add more seats, i.e. another site like IMP, SMP, NMP. This was supposed to tie in to a significant expansion of healthcare in the Fraser region, and Surrey Memorial in particular. But I haven't heard anything more on it since 2019
  5. Like
    Redpill reacted to acacna in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    I'm also a multi-time rejected applicant (5 cycles) and I can relate to how you might be feeling. I've moved on and did not interview this cycle, but it's still such an emotional time of the year for me. Even thinking about it sometimes brings tears. I have had some to process all of this and just wanted to share my 2 cents with you.
    I'm sorry life gave you this outcome. Know that you are not alone and there are many others like you in this boat, including myself. Many don't even bother posting because of how embarrassing it feels to be a multi-time rejected applicant. But this crowd exists and there's a good number of people in your shoes. 
    Life can be unfair, and the medschool admission system in Canada is somewhat unfair (imo at least). The luck element has a big role in the process. And it's not just medschool. There's so much injustice and bs around the world and no matter how much we try, there are certain things we just can't change. The reality is that the admission process for medical school, i.e the system, is extremely competitive and only the cream of the crop will get in. Its unlikely it's something about you. Perhaps there are areas you could improve on, but those may need more time. 
    I know you have put an extraordinary amount of effort towards your goal, and it can be baffling to be turned away with the one word 'rejected'. Its normal to be left jaded by it. I hope you take some time to come to your own realizations and keep working towards those things you care about. 
    When I first started undergrad back in '10, I was once told by an research supervisor/mentor of mine that a medical resident of his took 7 cycles, i.e 7 years, to get into medical school. I actually couldn't believe it lol. At the time it didn't make sense to me how someone could keep going for so long. But people still do because medicine is their passion. 
    Feel free to DM me if you would like someone to talk to. 
  6. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from wanderforhelp in Low GPA. Interviewed this year.   
    Amusingly, Mac kind of did admit this last year, when they offered most of their spots based on a lottery, instead of bothering to move interviews to a virtual platform.
    I don't think the reaction was very positive.
  7. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from whatisgoingon in Low GPA. Interviewed this year.   
    Not a fan of PBL/CBL? I thought it was a reasonably effective way to learn in preclerkship (supplemented with lecture material of course, idk how Mac does it without that)
  8. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from zxcccxz in How important is it to retain material long-term in order to pass the MCCQE?   
    Unrelated to the MCCQE, I don't think cramming is very effective for medical school. Sure you may do well on tests, but patients generally do better when their doctors know the stuff they are supposed to know.
    Do right by your future patients and try to study in a way that allows you to retain the knowledge long-term.
  9. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from aray623 in How important is it to retain material long-term in order to pass the MCCQE?   
    Unrelated to the MCCQE, I don't think cramming is very effective for medical school. Sure you may do well on tests, but patients generally do better when their doctors know the stuff they are supposed to know.
    Do right by your future patients and try to study in a way that allows you to retain the knowledge long-term.
  10. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from zoxy in Students who bought luxury cars during clerkship, how do you feel about them now?   
    Some people like to start enjoying their life before 65
  11. Like
    Redpill reacted to shikimate in Are physician salaries in Canada a bubble that is waiting to pop?   
    You guys are missing the point, high compensation for any government job can be negated by inflation. Yeah you might make 300K today, but if I keep you at that level for 3-5 years (aka what ON and AB tried to do), with Bank of Canada given the green light to let inflation run above 2% (well, actually M2 is increasing at 18% in 2020 if I remember correctly). Then in real terms your compensation is decreasing yearly, perhaps to the tune of 10-15% compounded.
    Same thing with government debt, every government in the world is hoping that inflation will slowly chip away at their debt without increasing taxes or cutting programs.
    That's why real estate, BTC, and gold price all go up like 10% a year. Sharp money is sharp, they aren't gonna keep them in a savings account. Money is just a number on a computer screen.
    If you are interested in how government find "clever" ways to reduce debt, read up on the Mississippi Company bubble of 1721.
    Also USA does not experience inflation to the same degree as other countries, because USD is the world's currency, hence it is able to "export" some inflation to other countries. For example in Canada we have tonnes of natural resources yet we have to sell, then buy them on international market in USD. Unfortunately CDN has a free floating exchange rate therefore expect inflation in Canada to be more severe than in US. That's why US is able to issue debt with impunity. So if you live and work in US, for now, as long as USD is the world's currency, you will live a very high standard of life (partially paid by every other country in the world that transacts in USD).
  12. Like
    Redpill reacted to jnuts in (Neurosurg) Realistic advice about job prospects   
    Sure....
    Other notable positive factors in recent neuro staff selection criteria: 
    Did you marry your program director?
    Did you support a certain faculty member in a recent academic coup? 
    Have you shamelessly publication jumped?
    I really wish the post above were true, but I think the truth is a LOT messier. 
  13. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from Jarisch in Do you think UAlberta/U of C med schools will become easier to gain admission from Alberta's failing economy?   
    Using GDP per capita as your only metric for evaluating quality of life is just as wrong as completely excluding it
  14. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from offmychestplease in Do you think UAlberta/U of C med schools will become easier to gain admission from Alberta's failing economy?   
    Using GDP per capita as your only metric for evaluating quality of life is just as wrong as completely excluding it
  15. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from conditional knockout in Current CaRMS Competitiveness - Schools and Specialties   
    I wonder if EM seems more competitive because there are two paths to become a practicing emergency physician, and many are agnostic as to which to take. They may not necessarily be the strongest candidates* but will still rank the 5-year first to try and avoid a second match. Whereas with surgical subspecialties, if you don't have the research early on you're not going to bother to try.
     
    *I mean strongest candidate with respect to research and ECs that align with EM. Many will still make great Emerg docs but may be weaker from a CV perspective, so end up matching to FM and taking the +1 route
  16. Like
    Redpill reacted to rmorelan in How do people answer the question of why should the program choose you??   
    well you start by not thinking you are an average medical student or perhaps better to remember an average medical student is a pretty awesome student (imagine you went around saying something like that in other areas - oh he is just an average Olympic swimmer, or average mountain climber and so on....technically true perhaps but not really giving you the right picture and definitely not the right attitude). 
    Probably boils down to thinking that programs are looking for the same basic things  Are you smart? Are you hard working? Are you not a jerk? Are you actually interested in the field enough to endure all the painful and exhausting parts of the training program? 
    What examples do you have that show the above characteristics? - and you do have examples etc. 
    Don't try to compare yourself to other candidates - you don't know their strengths/weaknesses anyway so you cannot do  that properly even if you wanted to. The conversation is not about them, it is about you. 
     
  17. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from brattatat in Students who bought luxury cars during clerkship, how do you feel about them now?   
    Some people like to start enjoying their life before 65
  18. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from Mustang92 in Can someone alleviate my anxiety re: CV requirements for CaRMS?   
    I think when you provide this anecdote on the forum you should emphasize the bolded. It will give students without much knowledge a more clear idea of their chances should they choose to use your strategy.
  19. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from mew in Importance of research for EM matching   
    From the other threads on here I gather that the most important things for matching are references, followed by interviews. I think the rest (research, ECs) will depend on how competitive a year it is. People who have done more will probably look better. So I doubt lack of research will significantly disadvantage you, but it may put you behind others who also receive good references and have it.
    That being said, I get the sense that EM in particular values advocacy as an EC. So I think that will help to some degree.
    I'm also still in medical school so take what I say with a grain of salt.
  20. Thanks
    Redpill reacted to nolongerpremed in Quality Of Calgary Fm Training?   
    I heard similar things from friends.. I am disappointed b/c U of C FM is my number one choice
  21. Thanks
    Redpill reacted to Keege T in Quality Of Calgary Fm Training?   
    This thread is a bit dated now, but to anyone cheching it out, -  University of Calgary Family Medicine has only gotten worse in the past years. Terrible leadership, very unsupportive, micromanagement and not treating residents with respect, and a poor ratio of high vs low value learning experiences/ preceptors. They actually had 20 unmatched CARMs spots this year, which is a steady increase over the past few years, and definitely can't be explained away as a coincidence at this point. University of Alberta has a far more solid Family Medicine program at this point. 
  22. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from honeymoon in Students who bought luxury cars during clerkship, how do you feel about them now?   
    Some people like to start enjoying their life before 65
  23. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from striders02 in Students who bought luxury cars during clerkship, how do you feel about them now?   
    Some people like to start enjoying their life before 65
  24. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from Lavarball in Students who bought luxury cars during clerkship, how do you feel about them now?   
    Some people like to start enjoying their life before 65
  25. Like
    Redpill got a reaction from langouste in Students who bought luxury cars during clerkship, how do you feel about them now?   
    Some people like to start enjoying their life before 65
×
×
  • Create New...