Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

DDS.2019

Members
  • Content Count

    8
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to KentuckyFriedBlaziken in Western's Strengths and Weaknesses   
    I got all the answers:
    Clinic exposure: every single Canadian school is trash compared to US in clinical exposure amount across the board , and Western is definitely no exception. You may get more exposure to complicated cases (except for ortho) at Western but it overall exposure will be low.
    Opportunity after graduation: well if you want to practice in Canada it saves you from writing 2 boards than if you went to a US school, other than that I don't think it matters much which school you went to. With regard to jobs, the connections with sales reps/part time dentists may make it easier to find a job in the surrounding London area, but there are many ways to network outside the school as well. With regard to specialty, all 3 people I know of in my class, that actually applied to specialties in the US got in this year. Same with GPR/AEGD, I only know of 1 reject from a GPR.
    Boards: pretty much zero instruction, you study for the boards on your own and that's probably true everywhere, we pass along resources as a class amongst each other. However I have seen some good review courses/resources come out of US schools, but you'd do best to ask the specific school. 
    Workload: It's a bit uneven across the years, and at least 50% of your clinical years is wasted on stupid admin and misc matters. Support is good from your peers, we have great notes and generally try to help the lower years do better than we did. From faculty it is uneven once again, but by and large everyone wants you to graduate. 
     
    General comment: I personally think clinical education is just so much better in the US as a whole, however within 1 year of practice you'll catch up, and your debt load is about 40-50% less if you go to a Canadian school. You get what you pay for essentially, and the final decision is yours. 
     
    Feel free to PM me for any more specific questions. 
     
  2. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to cleanup in Third Year Clinical Experience   
    I teach third years on occasion. You guys have literally just started interacting with patients in a way that goes beyond hygiene/cleanings. It's completely normal for this to feel foreign, awkward, nerve-wracking, anxiety-inducing, the-walls-are-closing-on-me-please-end-this-now. And in a school environment, it can be really strange since you feel like there are multiple people breathing down your neck. It's for this reason I really try to take a different approach most instructors do with students; I'm there to help you guys learn, to make the situation enjoyable and fun and as casual as possible, not berate or put you down for doing something I wouldn't do or differently than I think you should. It's completely unreasonable for me to expect you to know exactly what to do, how to do it, when to do it, and then execute it to my standards. The truth is, when you walk out of clinic, you shouldn't be pondering "Did I do good? Did I do that well?" you should be thinking, "Did I learn something today? Yes. Okay. Good. Onto the next."
    I know it's hard not to get tunnel vision with what you're doing, but try to take a step back and realize that you're there to learn. You are indeed, there to make mistakes. I know that sounds catastrophically wrong, but it's the truth. It is a school, first and foremost, not a dental clinic. The patients receiving care bit is sort of just a necessary consequence. I assure you that, in the end, although it's a long road, it all evens out, and your learning continues heavily into private practice.
    I'm 3 years into private practice and only now can I say that I feel pretty confident with 90-95% of the situations I encounter on a daily basis in general practice. I still refer things out, and even with some bread-and-butter things I still run into trouble, because it's the nature of it. But I approach situations like this differently. I used to approach it with the occasional "I'm not sure what the fuck is going on here" mentality and allow fear or anxiety to take hold. Now I approach it with the mindset of "I'm just here to do my best and take good care of my patient and maybe learn somethign along the way" and I allow that to take me wherever it may. It has allowed me to become a better dentist, both clinically and non-clinically.
    You're not just a student of dentistry, you're a student of life. Treat it that way and you'll feel less anxious about your situation. Zoom out a little bit. It'll be fine.
  3. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to Zaandrei. in Applying to dental schools with a disability?   
    This is no joke^
     
  4. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to Rollierollie in November 2018 DAT Thoughts   
    LOLOL.
    Spoke with my brother today who's currently doing dental anaesthesia in the US (DDS in Canada). Sent him the scale this year and was pretty much complaining to him, hoping he'd give his lil bro some "cheer-up talk"...
    but the dude was like "This just means all of you did bad this year. Like yeah, cool you scored 98th percentile out of everyone who did relatively poor, but that doesn't necessarily mean you deserve a particular raw score in retrospect of previous scores to the 98th percentile. Are the scores the same, if the average for a test was 80 and highest score was a 95, then next year the similar exam gives the average of 60 and highest score was 75? Assuming they have some kind of a cutoff, everyone this year just under-performed compared to previous years. Just study harder man, you know you're better than that"
    He managed to call me dumb without actually saying it lol.. Tbh his reply made me laugh and I think I'm just gonna use this to motivate myself for this upcoming Feb DAT. It kinda sounds harsh at first but I know he doesn't mean anything bad. The dude's always been kinda hard on me to make me strive further, There really isn't anything to be done, since I'm sure they'll get complaints from people who wrote their DAT this Feb, or even last year November, if they decided to adjust anything. Bad luck this year, hoping to be better this February.
     
  5. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to human instinct in The slow decay of dentistry   
    This thread has some interesting discussion topics. Just to put things in perspective, I graduated about 3 years ago. What I have learned this past little while is that managing early burn out is a challenge. I would be more concerned about establishing a balance between work and life than anything else. Income comes with - God's will and-the decisions you make to improve your skillset, going into ownership, working longer days etc. What's more important than anything else is to find the right balance between your career and life. It's not too difficult to earn a good income but if it comes at the cost of sacrificing your health, physical and emotional, then you are not doing justice to yourself or the profession. 
  6. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to realdealdent in Subjects/topics To Learn About Business For Dentistry   
    Everyone likes to throw out to students that they should learn the "business side of dentistry", "practice management" etc. I personally think that's overrated advice. 
     
    You're going to have an accountant as a dentist. No dentist files their own taxes. Your accountant is going to be highly paid and will tell you exactly how to structure yourself, your personal/corporate finances etc. 
     
    Learning GAAP will not help you be a better or more successful dentist. The business side of dentistry isn't rocket science. Keep your overhead as low as you can, without affecting patient care. Invest into your practice where there will be a ROI. First year business / economics / accounting isn't going to help. 
  7. Like
    DDS.2019 got a reaction from Dentiste in xx   
    I was rejected after an interview the first time I applied to Western. I was a lousy interviewer. I took a year off of school to work, shadow, and volunteer a bunch. I was never interested in doing a Master's (I've done some research and it isn't my thing) and instead decided to focus on activities that I genuinely enjoyed. That way, I had meaningful things to talk about in my next interview. I also practiced interviewing EVERY night for about a month leading up to my second interview. Practice with people who are good at it! Find methods of structuring your answers without sounding rehearsed.  
     
    I highly, highly recommend shadowing if you haven't already - you need to know that your heart is in this profession. If you genuinely want this, this setback will seem trivial, and your passion will show through in your interview. Dental school is difficult and you will experience failure, big or small. I guarantee that this experience will help you to grow as a person.
     
    Best of luck! 
  8. Like
    DDS.2019 got a reaction from ItsBeenReal in xx   
    I was rejected after an interview the first time I applied to Western. I was a lousy interviewer. I took a year off of school to work, shadow, and volunteer a bunch. I was never interested in doing a Master's (I've done some research and it isn't my thing) and instead decided to focus on activities that I genuinely enjoyed. That way, I had meaningful things to talk about in my next interview. I also practiced interviewing EVERY night for about a month leading up to my second interview. Practice with people who are good at it! Find methods of structuring your answers without sounding rehearsed.  
     
    I highly, highly recommend shadowing if you haven't already - you need to know that your heart is in this profession. If you genuinely want this, this setback will seem trivial, and your passion will show through in your interview. Dental school is difficult and you will experience failure, big or small. I guarantee that this experience will help you to grow as a person.
     
    Best of luck! 
  9. Like
    DDS.2019 got a reaction from pyridoxal-phosphate in xx   
    I was rejected after an interview the first time I applied to Western. I was a lousy interviewer. I took a year off of school to work, shadow, and volunteer a bunch. I was never interested in doing a Master's (I've done some research and it isn't my thing) and instead decided to focus on activities that I genuinely enjoyed. That way, I had meaningful things to talk about in my next interview. I also practiced interviewing EVERY night for about a month leading up to my second interview. Practice with people who are good at it! Find methods of structuring your answers without sounding rehearsed.  
     
    I highly, highly recommend shadowing if you haven't already - you need to know that your heart is in this profession. If you genuinely want this, this setback will seem trivial, and your passion will show through in your interview. Dental school is difficult and you will experience failure, big or small. I guarantee that this experience will help you to grow as a person.
     
    Best of luck! 
  10. Like
    DDS.2019 got a reaction from Araiguma in Western Application :(   
    Are you applying this year or next cycle? If you're applying this year, as long as it's a 4-year degree, you should be in good shape with your RC, GPA and good ECs. You can challenge the physiology exam if you haven't taken a physiology course.
  11. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to ImaDentt2014 in The Future Of Dentistry Is Cr*p...   
    I am a dentist, who graduated from Schulich in 2014. This thread has gotten out of control. There are a handful of posters who are knowledgeable (either dentists or dental students) and then those looking from the ther side of the pond (predentists) that are worried and perhaps misinformed in parts.
     
    Predentists: I understand the worry. I heard it when I was in dental school too. But this thread has been blown way, way out of proportion. A few painters seem upset about things, and the comments and their facts are spiralling down.
     
    I work in Oakville and Woodbridge ON, both close to Toronto. One practice was a new practice four years ago, one is with a long established single dentist practice.
     
    I am a competent dentist, I'm cautiously quick at restorative, always felt comfortable with endo (root canal therapy) and enjoy prosthodontics (dentures). I would put myself in the top 1/3 of my class clinically, but I am not gifted, just a regular recent grad.
     
    I produce on any normal day 1000-2000. If I had to pick an average, I'd say $1500. On a slow day it could be 600 (my lowest day in a year) and on a good day with a denture insertion for example it could be $3500 (my highest day this year was around $4200). I get paid 40% of collections and don't know a single friend working for less then 40%, although I'm sure someone is.
     
    My first year of private practice I made $170,000. With tuition tax credits, I barely paid income tax. This helped wipe out a huge Amin t of student debt for me (I paid for dental school myself with summer work and loans).
     
    My second year I'm on track to make slightly more.
     
    I keep in touch with all my dental school friends, and my best friends and I talk production numbers honestly, it's not a taboo subject for us. The lowest I know is a friend working full time at a dental practice on Liberty village in Toronto, and he's making around $110,000.
     
    With incorporating your dental practice, income taxes on your corporation are 10-15.5%, then you take a $65,000 salary and save for retirement within your dental Corp.
     
    It really doesn't take much to produce $1000 per day. I'm not just saying that. It's nothing. Even slow practices in downtown Toronto.
     
    There is crazy gloom and doom in this thread. I won't call anyone out, but some commenters are simply not accurate here.
     
    Dentistry is a ton of fun too. I can't imagine sitting at a desk. When I have breaks in between patients, even long ones, I'm either working up a case, writing notes, or watching Netflix, snapchat, Facebook on my phone etc. I plan to work 4 days per week soon. Even looking forward, as bad as they make it out to be, you'll always make a pretty good salary in a great job. Even if you saw 3 patients per day you could make a great salary. You can afford a mortgage, you can marry, have kids (future dentists), it's a great life.
     
    I'll stop by tomorrow to answer questions for a new grad if anyone has them, though they probably won't be as long as this post was.
     
    Cheer up friends, it's gonna be good.
  12. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to WomboCombo in The Future Of Dentistry Is Cr*p...   
    There are many reasons why some dentists are much more successful than others (in no particular order): business acumen, interpersonal skills (patients want to come to a great personality who is ethical and trustworthy and calms them down), clinical skills (for example, you are able to be better at your hand speed and skill and you cause minimal pain), expansion of services (CEREC, STO, Powerprox, etc.), competitive pricing, and etc. Not every dentist is struggling but it is not as much of a guarantee these days for sure. You need to possess some if not all of the above traits I described to do well. Create your own niche. Remember, in dentistry: you are your own brand.
     
    I think the competition is insane but there is reason why some dentists win the fight you are talking about. And it is not all coincidence. It takes a lot of calculation and trial and error. It is stressful (production goals can be very stressful) but there is still a big reward. It is not all doom and gloom as this thread is making it. Dentistry is evolving. Also, the oversaturation is ONLY one of its issues. The lack of billing fee increases, the ability for denturists and hygienists to create their own practices without any dentist involved are other issues. But dentistry in Canada still has its good points: lower corporate tax, no PPO or HMO or Medicaid, very little corp penetrance, and etc. For every pain point, there is still a point to be hopeful for. No career is perfect. While dentists should not fight for patients, dentists should not expect patients to show up at their door. Patients are frugal and smarter about oral health these days. The internet can provide ample information (reviews, etc.) for them to make more education decisions about who their practitioner may be. Once again, this career is evolving. One needs to learn to adapt.
     
    Medicine is safer (relative to dentistry) but it is facing its own share of issues these days. And the issue is that medicine is a career where for sure your location is secondary to being able to find a job. This is just one of the many sacrifices MDs make. Nothing is easy out there.
     
    Cheers
  13. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to Zaandrei. in Uwo Tuition Fees   
    Did you know that the tuition fees are 2/3 subsidized by the government? $100 (x4) is quite insignificant looking at the bigger picture. I'm sure that if they hid that in the tuition you wouldn't have even questioned it.
     
    I felt a bit cheated at first too, but things changed quickly for me. You'll see where your money goes next year
     
     
    Think of it as a tip if you wish... it's assumed; but still voluntary
  14. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to Zaandrei. in Uwo Tuition Fees   
    You can't opt out of the buss pass; some universities have this build into their tuition system (I know Windsor had/has the same thing). Consider it a system in which the less privileged individuals have a mode of cost-efficient transportation by offering the entire university demographic a deal.

    Dentistry donation fee you can opt out of. But really...

    Also this should be probably discussed on the Facebook group; not on here
  15. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to cleanup in I Just Graduated From U Of T And Am A New Associate. Ask Me (Almost) Anything!   
    I'm going to assume you're talking about a general practice residency. That entirely depends on the residency you do as well as what type of associateship you have. You can have residencies where you'll just be doing a lot of surgery, dentures, basic restorative on medically and mentally compromised people. Others you might be doing implants, complex prostho cases, with or without sedation, etc. They run the gamut and you need to do your research to see which one is right for you. Similarly associateships can differ; I can tell you that in your first year of practice you probably won't be (read: shouldn't be) doing uber complex cases involving implant placement, full mouth rehab, etc., but in residency you may get this opportunity to do it under supervision. That's a huge plus obviously. Otherwise, you're apt to make a much greater income in one year of associateship than a residency, even if you're not working very hard and just doing basic dentistry. Residency isn't about its renumeration (and in my honest opinion, neither should associating be); in both I would advise you to make learning your main priority. 
     
    So I'd say the following GENERALLY holds true, but once again dependant on context:
     
    Residency: more exposure to high levels of theory, get to rotate through medical fields, might get to do some complex stuff, not compensated greatly (though some residencies will bundle in certifications that are worth quite a bit, but it still doesn't quite touch associateship)
    Associateship: exposure to what private practice is actually like, learn a lot more about time management, business, how to treatment plan in the real world, talk to patients, etc., get compensated for what you do, but your income is up to you and the level of mentorship you receive is entirely up to your principals/colleagues
     
     
     
     
    If you're talking about finding a job and being the one they hire, none of the above. MAYBE networking to a small extent, but overall I'd say your clinical experience, grades & whatever-else-the-hell you did in dental school are all completely secondary to one single thing: your character. If you do not make an impression on and get along with the people interviewing you and the office as a whole, you will not be hired, at least not by an office that actually has an investment in its associates (and you want that, obviously). It doesn't matter if you're the top of the class, if you cured cancer, if you built a fresh-water well in Zimbabwe. One of my principals put it this way: he hires slowly, and fires quickly. You have to present yourself well. Dentistry can be taught. Character cannot.
     
    That said, if they love you, hire you, and you start messing up on a regular basis, you'll be out of there quickly, but the way you carry yourself and whether or not they like the person, not the dentist, is what determines whether or not you're given the chance.
  16. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to ottawaliquid in Laptop For Western   
    What's a laptop?
  17. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to Kentucky Fried Blaziken in Schulich Admissions   
    pre-emptive congrats to those accepted! If you are for sure coming to Western then here is the facebook group
     
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/106893029720988/
     
    Not sure if the admins are online so may take a while to add you
  18. Like
    DDS.2019 got a reaction from ottawaliquid in Experiences In Dentist Shadowing?   
    No Nobel Peace Prize?!?!
  19. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to cleanup in Experiences In Dentist Shadowing?   
    Those two weren't so much my concern as much as learning 'how to do a root canal' and 'how to drill around the teeth for wisdom teeth extraction'. The gross oversimplification of 'learning how' to do these things aside, I'm amazed anyone let you try to take the helm on either of these at all. I could teach a highschooler how to take an impression but I'm not able to teach them how to navigate a canal or how to trough bone without, you know, a dental school. If you do talk about these experiences in interviews or something, be sure to be clear about the distinction about which actually involved you touching a live patient. I think most people would be taken aghast if you said you 'did a root canal'; it sounds kind of ridiculous, if not terrifying.
  20. Like
    DDS.2019 got a reaction from dds19 in Experiences In Dentist Shadowing?   
    No Nobel Peace Prize?!?!
  21. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to Zaandrei. in Uwo And U Of T Interview Prep Materials   
    That is correct, the interview at UWO will be more geared toward the traditional style of interviews. Also they don't want to give you the ability to 'prepare' for the interview as you would for the CDA. Trust me, they know you have those PDFs with 400+ CDA style questions... they don't want you to simply regurgitate practiced answers. An interview should be a display of character, with a foundation made up of your life experiences, not something you built up in a month practicing for the interview. I definitely wouldn't call it 'unfair'... because everyone will be evaluated in a similar fashion. Not like one individual is getting the CDA structure and the other is not.

    For the individuals who have had some interview experience before this may actually help. Make a list a of life experiences you may want to draw upon when answering questions. Read 'doing right' if you want some inspiration on ethical issues (not required). Read a few of those CDA questions to trigger thoughts, but don't go out preparing an answer for each one and memorizing them. Practice in front of the mirror if you wish, then move on to practicing with family members, friends and others which may be in the same boat as you. I know my school had an actual program set-up for mock interviews... although not dentistry specific, they seemed to have helped a few people out----gain confidence so that you don't lock up during the interview!
  22. Like
    DDS.2019 reacted to dentiep in Any Current Uwo/schulich Dds Students?   
    LOL Zaandrei, unlike your username my identity might not be as obvious
     
  23. Like
    DDS.2019 got a reaction from ottawaliquid in Uwo Acceptance/waitlist/rejected 2019   
    A little late, but I'm a long-time lurker of this forum and a re-applicant so thought I'd post my stats to help out future applicants! Good luck!
     
    Accepted
    Best 2-year GPA: 90% (full course-load)
    DAT score: RC-20, AA-19
    Interview Thoughts: Went well, very friendly interviewers.
    Year: Finished undergrad. 
    Geography: IP.
    Accepted offer.
×
×
  • Create New...