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OwnerOfTheTARDIS

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  1. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from cheerfulmed in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    The semester I spent in Vancouver I didn't get a car (really needed one once I got to the IMP, but that's a different story).
    I strongly recommend not buying a car. Sign up for either Evo/Car2Go AND either Modo/Zipcar. I'll explain why: Evo/Car2Go are one way car shares. You can pick it up and then leave it anywhere within the "home zone" (most of Vancouver, part of North Van, and part of New West - check the online map) and it's ~$15 an hour. Modo/Zipcar are return car shares - you have to put the car back exactly where you picked it up, but it's only $8 per hour. So if you want to drive from UBC to downtown and then stay all day, it's way cheaper to take Evo/Car2Go. If you are just going to pick up something from the store or go to an appointment and then return home,  it's cheaper to take Modo/Zipcar. 
    I personally used Evo and Modo and highly vouch for both of them. I almost never took the bus and always took an Evo to clin skills/family practice, went downtown ~once a week, and twice took a modo to get to medical appointments all the way in Maple Ridge - it basically felt like having my own car. I spent less than $300 over the semester, which as I recall was about the price of a parking pass at UBC. Keep in mind that you don't have to pay for insurance or gas or the upfront cost of a car. 
    I also highly recommend getting groceries online. Save-On has online shopping - I usually just place my order and pick it up next day after class (free) or during exam season pay for delivery ($4-10, depending on the time of day I want it delivered). It saves so much time and has changed my life. 
  2. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to JohnSnow2021 in CaRMS 2021 Interview Tracker -- INVITATIONS ONLY   
    Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Feb 16), Calgary (Feb 16), McGill (Feb 16), McMaster (Feb 16), Western (Feb 17), Manitoba (Feb 19), Alberta (Feb 22), UBC (Feb 22), Dalhousie (Feb 24), Université de Montreal (Feb 23), Université de Laval (Feb 23) Anesthesiology: NOSM (Feb 22), UBC (Feb 22), Alberta (Feb 23), Usask (Feb 25) Cardiac Surgery: Toronto (Feb 16), Manitoba (Feb 22), Alberta (Feb 23), Montreal (Feb 24), Ottawa (Feb 24 Dermatology: ULaval (Feb 23), Calgary (Feb 23) Diagnostic Radiology: Dalhousie (Feb 18), McGill (Feb 19), Queen’s (Feb 23), Saskatchewan (Feb 23), Manitoba (Feb 23), MUN (Feb 24), Calgary (Feb 24), Montreal (Feb 24), Laval (Feb 24), McMaster (Feb 25) Emergency Medicine: Ottawa (Feb 22), Queen's (Feb 22), UBC (Feb 25 -Phone call @12pm EST), Manitoba (Feb 25) Family Medicine: Joint Ontario IMG (feb15), Joint Quebec Francophone Schools (Feb 16), McGill Châteauguay (Feb 19), UBC Family Medicine (Feb 19th), McGill Gatineau (Feb 19), McGill Montreal Site (Feb 20) Dalhousie (Feb 23), Alberta (Feb 23), U of T (Feb 23), McMaster CMG (Feb 24) Dalhousie IMG ( feb24) Alberta IMG  (Feb 24) Memorial (Feb 25) General Pathology: Calgary (Feb 9), Alberta (Feb 22), McMaster (Feb 23) General Surgery: MUN (Feb 9), Sherbrooke (Feb 18), McMaster Niagara Campus (Feb 20), McGill (Feb 21), Saskatchewan (23 Feb), Manitoba (Feb 23), Western (Feb 24), Laval (Feb 25) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary(Feb 10), Université de Montreal(19 Feb) Medical Microbiology: Manitoba (Feb 11), Calgary (Feb 18) Neurology: Toronto (Feb 19), Manitoba (Feb 22), Sherbrooke (Feb 23), Queen's (Feb 24), Dalhousie (Feb 24), Calgary (Feb 24), McGill (Feb 24), Alberta (Feb 25) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Feb 9), McMaster (Feb 16), McGill (Feb 22), UBC (Feb 23) Neuropathology: Calgary (Feb 16) Neurosurgery: Saskatchewan (Feb 11), Manitoba (Feb 19), UBC (Feb 22), Sherbrooke (Feb 22), Toronto (Feb 23), Ottawa (Feb 23), Calgary (Feb 24), McGill (Feb 25), Alberta (Feb 25), Western (Feb 25) Nuclear Medicine: Sherbrooke (Feb 18), McGill (Feb 22), Manitoba (Feb 24) Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Ottawa IMG (Feb 12), Alberta CMG (Feb 22), McGill (Feb 25), Toronto CMG (Feb 25) Ophthalmology: Dalhousie (Feb 25), Saskatchewan (Feb 25), UBC (Feb 25) Orthopaedic Surgery: Dalhousie (Feb 19), UAlberta (Feb 22), Memorial (Feb 23), Sherbrooke (Feb 23), Toronto (Feb 24), Toronto IMG (Feb 24), McGill (Feb 24), Laval (Feb 25), UdeM/Montreal (Feb 25), McMaster (Feb 25), NOSM (Feb 25) Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery: Toronto (Feb 22), McGill (Feb 23) Pediatrics: Western IMG (Feb 24), Manitoba IMG (Feb 24), UBC IMG (Feb.24), McMaster IMG (feb 24), UOttawa IMG (Feb 24)  Plastic Surgery: Manitoba (Feb 16th), Ottawa (Feb 24), Toronto (Feb 24)  PM&R: Calgary (Feb 11), Manitoba (Feb 16), Dalhousie (Feb 18), Queen's (Feb 19), Ottawa (Feb 19), Western (Feb 22), Saskatchewan (Feb 23), McMaster (Feb 23), Alberta (Feb 24), Toronto (Feb 24) Psychiatry: Manitoba (Feb 12), Memorial (Feb 17), McGill (Feb 17), Calgary (Feb 17), Toronto (Feb 19), Saskatoon (Feb 22), Regina (Feb 22), Sherbrooke - Moncton (Feb 22), Sherbrooke (Feb 22), UBC (Feb 22), Western (Feb 23), McMaster (Feb 23), Laval (Feb 23), NOSM (Feb 24), Alberta (Feb 24), Manitoba Winnipeg (Feb 25) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Saskatchewan (Feb 9), Ottawa (Feb 21), Toronto (Feb 23), UBC (Feb 24), Alberta (Feb 24)  Radiation Oncology: Calgary (Feb 9), Alberta (Feb 10), Montreal (Feb 10), McMaster(Feb 12), UBC (Feb 17) Urology: Montreal (Feb 23), Alberta (Feb 24),  McMaster (Feb 25) Vascular Surgery: Manitoba (Feb 16th), Western (Feb 17th), Montreal (Feb 23) Just switching back to the original formatting - it's hard to see which invitations have gone out when the program names are all bolded :).
  3. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to MedHopeful93 in what do FM and IM PDs look for   
    I think the original question stated they are “often” used as a backup. I didn’t interpret this as saying “most” or that they’re not also mostly applied to as a first choice.  
     
    Truth is, they are often a parallel plan for other specialties. That doesn’t mean they’re not worthy specialties in their own right! I think of family medicine and internal as very universally relevant and valuable regardless of what other specialties you are also applying to (if that’s the case) and that’s why I think many people choose to parallel with them! 
    I can imagine thinking of FM and IM as “backup” specialties (which I don’t think is fair, btw) is probably a source of tension for people who chose them as their 1st.  I also don’t think it’s fair to say that someone is being disrespectful for asking what these PDs look for because these programs are more often 2nd choice compared to, say plastics.  That’s not a value judgment, the latter would just be poor strategy!
    Just hoping to add some understanding to this stressful time❤️❤️❤️
  4. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to bearded frog in what do FM and IM PDs look for   
    Or, you know, you could not make up statistics? CaRMS publishes this data plainly (tables 9 and 11).
    For CMGs, in 2020 there were 953 first choice FM applicants and 2125 total, meaning that only 44.8% of total applicants to FM had it as their first choice, and the majority of FM applicants literally are applying it as a second or lower choice. The numbers for IM are 453 first choice applicants of 885 total spots, or 51.2% of all IM applicants ranked it as their first choice. So for IM, it's technically true that the majority have it as their first choice, but I wouldn't say its clear at all.
    And when you say "It's often their only choice specialty" we can see that would only apply if you consider 30% (640) for FM and 17% (148) for IM often...
    I'm not hating on FM or IM, its just how things are. Only 17 people only applied to peds last year (I was one of them in my year).
    Frankly, it's not at all controversial that people often back up with IM and FM. To answer OP's question, they look to see if you would make a good family medicine/internal medicine resident and doctor, same as if someone was gunning it. You can't just apply and cross your fingers. You'll need to plan ahead and get FM/IM specific letters of reference, write personal letters about why you want to do FM/IM at X program, and for IM especially do some relevant electives. Even if you have 5 derm electives and 2 family electives you can very validly say that you were interested in another specialty early on and then found that FM is the life for you. It's not a secret that people apply to multiple specialties, they are not going to ask you if you're applying to something else, you just have to show that even if you don't match your first choice that you'd still be happy and do well in your back-up.
  5. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to bearded frog in what do FM and IM PDs look for   
    Nothing OP said was disrespectful. They could only be applying to IM and wants to know how to make their application stand out and demonstrate that they only want to do IM. And its not disrespectful to say that there are more competitive specialties out there that people also apply to other specialties in case they don't match. That's not a knock against IM/FM, it means that its a desirable field that a lot of people could see themselves doing, among other things. It's also a numbers game as together they have more spots than the rest of the other specialties combined.
  6. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to bearded frog in If your GPA was negatively affected because your winter 2020 grades were not counted/you were forced to take CR in lieu of grades, please post details here   
    My bad, I thought your argument was that grades should continue to be not counted or stay pass fail. I didn't realize you were actually trying to go back in time and get compensation? for not having grades scored, which is even dumber. There are a million excellent reasons why that happened and why it was the fairest way to do things, feel free to google it.
  7. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from struggling2getin in Simon Fraser University to Get BC's Second Medical School   
    As a 4th year UBC Med student, I don’t think there is any chance that this will actually happen for one reason: it makes no sense.
    It would take minimum 8-10 years to produce a single independent doctor if they started developing a new medical school today, compared to 2 years if they increased the number of residency seats and accepted more highly qualified IMGs.
    Secondly, there are barely enough residencies for current graduates and believe me, you don’t want to be >100k in debt in 4th year and scared you won’t match.
    Thirdly, UBC is already poised to fill the need for increased seats in Med school. In addition to having the IMP, SMP, and NMP, they are already in negotiations with Fraser Health to create a Fraser program, in which students in VFMP would be split and a subset complete their core clerkship (3rd year) based entirely out of the Fraser (expanding the number of sites that can be utilized within a reasonable commute).
    Finally, in 4th year there are already barely enough electives, especially in certain specialties likefamily practice. During covid, the faculty has been extremely active working with divisions of family practice, hospitals and specialists to increase elective capacity but there still aren’t enough electives in many disciplines. Even in 1st and 2nd year, they struggle to find enough preceptors.
    As much as it is difficult to hear for pre-meds, BC just lacks capacity to start a new med school without reciprocally reducing capacity at UBC. This is why I think it was just an election promise full of buzz words that won’t turn in to anything in the near future. Maybe more residency seats, hopefully.
  8. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to Fast_Layne in Life Advice from the Internet   
    I have a different take from the other commenters. You can build experiences anytime, but GPA is something you can only build right now. If you have a shot to tangibly improve your GPA, I would do it now rather than later. Getting stuff for the NAQ is kind of a blackbox, and it's easier said than done. But improving your GPA is something that's really concrete and will undeniably improve your app.
    Good luck deciding!! Just wanted to offer an alternative take
  9. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from Pterygoid in Simon Fraser University to Get BC's Second Medical School   
    As a 4th year UBC Med student, I don’t think there is any chance that this will actually happen for one reason: it makes no sense.
    It would take minimum 8-10 years to produce a single independent doctor if they started developing a new medical school today, compared to 2 years if they increased the number of residency seats and accepted more highly qualified IMGs.
    Secondly, there are barely enough residencies for current graduates and believe me, you don’t want to be >100k in debt in 4th year and scared you won’t match.
    Thirdly, UBC is already poised to fill the need for increased seats in Med school. In addition to having the IMP, SMP, and NMP, they are already in negotiations with Fraser Health to create a Fraser program, in which students in VFMP would be split and a subset complete their core clerkship (3rd year) based entirely out of the Fraser (expanding the number of sites that can be utilized within a reasonable commute).
    Finally, in 4th year there are already barely enough electives, especially in certain specialties likefamily practice. During covid, the faculty has been extremely active working with divisions of family practice, hospitals and specialists to increase elective capacity but there still aren’t enough electives in many disciplines. Even in 1st and 2nd year, they struggle to find enough preceptors.
    As much as it is difficult to hear for pre-meds, BC just lacks capacity to start a new med school without reciprocally reducing capacity at UBC. This is why I think it was just an election promise full of buzz words that won’t turn in to anything in the near future. Maybe more residency seats, hopefully.
  10. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from Psych in Simon Fraser University to Get BC's Second Medical School   
    As a 4th year UBC Med student, I don’t think there is any chance that this will actually happen for one reason: it makes no sense.
    It would take minimum 8-10 years to produce a single independent doctor if they started developing a new medical school today, compared to 2 years if they increased the number of residency seats and accepted more highly qualified IMGs.
    Secondly, there are barely enough residencies for current graduates and believe me, you don’t want to be >100k in debt in 4th year and scared you won’t match.
    Thirdly, UBC is already poised to fill the need for increased seats in Med school. In addition to having the IMP, SMP, and NMP, they are already in negotiations with Fraser Health to create a Fraser program, in which students in VFMP would be split and a subset complete their core clerkship (3rd year) based entirely out of the Fraser (expanding the number of sites that can be utilized within a reasonable commute).
    Finally, in 4th year there are already barely enough electives, especially in certain specialties likefamily practice. During covid, the faculty has been extremely active working with divisions of family practice, hospitals and specialists to increase elective capacity but there still aren’t enough electives in many disciplines. Even in 1st and 2nd year, they struggle to find enough preceptors.
    As much as it is difficult to hear for pre-meds, BC just lacks capacity to start a new med school without reciprocally reducing capacity at UBC. This is why I think it was just an election promise full of buzz words that won’t turn in to anything in the near future. Maybe more residency seats, hopefully.
  11. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from VigoVirgo in Simon Fraser University to Get BC's Second Medical School   
    As a 4th year UBC Med student, I don’t think there is any chance that this will actually happen for one reason: it makes no sense.
    It would take minimum 8-10 years to produce a single independent doctor if they started developing a new medical school today, compared to 2 years if they increased the number of residency seats and accepted more highly qualified IMGs.
    Secondly, there are barely enough residencies for current graduates and believe me, you don’t want to be >100k in debt in 4th year and scared you won’t match.
    Thirdly, UBC is already poised to fill the need for increased seats in Med school. In addition to having the IMP, SMP, and NMP, they are already in negotiations with Fraser Health to create a Fraser program, in which students in VFMP would be split and a subset complete their core clerkship (3rd year) based entirely out of the Fraser (expanding the number of sites that can be utilized within a reasonable commute).
    Finally, in 4th year there are already barely enough electives, especially in certain specialties likefamily practice. During covid, the faculty has been extremely active working with divisions of family practice, hospitals and specialists to increase elective capacity but there still aren’t enough electives in many disciplines. Even in 1st and 2nd year, they struggle to find enough preceptors.
    As much as it is difficult to hear for pre-meds, BC just lacks capacity to start a new med school without reciprocally reducing capacity at UBC. This is why I think it was just an election promise full of buzz words that won’t turn in to anything in the near future. Maybe more residency seats, hopefully.
  12. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from frenchpress in Simon Fraser University to Get BC's Second Medical School   
    As a 4th year UBC Med student, I don’t think there is any chance that this will actually happen for one reason: it makes no sense.
    It would take minimum 8-10 years to produce a single independent doctor if they started developing a new medical school today, compared to 2 years if they increased the number of residency seats and accepted more highly qualified IMGs.
    Secondly, there are barely enough residencies for current graduates and believe me, you don’t want to be >100k in debt in 4th year and scared you won’t match.
    Thirdly, UBC is already poised to fill the need for increased seats in Med school. In addition to having the IMP, SMP, and NMP, they are already in negotiations with Fraser Health to create a Fraser program, in which students in VFMP would be split and a subset complete their core clerkship (3rd year) based entirely out of the Fraser (expanding the number of sites that can be utilized within a reasonable commute).
    Finally, in 4th year there are already barely enough electives, especially in certain specialties likefamily practice. During covid, the faculty has been extremely active working with divisions of family practice, hospitals and specialists to increase elective capacity but there still aren’t enough electives in many disciplines. Even in 1st and 2nd year, they struggle to find enough preceptors.
    As much as it is difficult to hear for pre-meds, BC just lacks capacity to start a new med school without reciprocally reducing capacity at UBC. This is why I think it was just an election promise full of buzz words that won’t turn in to anything in the near future. Maybe more residency seats, hopefully.
  13. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from keipop in Simon Fraser University to Get BC's Second Medical School   
    As a 4th year UBC Med student, I don’t think there is any chance that this will actually happen for one reason: it makes no sense.
    It would take minimum 8-10 years to produce a single independent doctor if they started developing a new medical school today, compared to 2 years if they increased the number of residency seats and accepted more highly qualified IMGs.
    Secondly, there are barely enough residencies for current graduates and believe me, you don’t want to be >100k in debt in 4th year and scared you won’t match.
    Thirdly, UBC is already poised to fill the need for increased seats in Med school. In addition to having the IMP, SMP, and NMP, they are already in negotiations with Fraser Health to create a Fraser program, in which students in VFMP would be split and a subset complete their core clerkship (3rd year) based entirely out of the Fraser (expanding the number of sites that can be utilized within a reasonable commute).
    Finally, in 4th year there are already barely enough electives, especially in certain specialties likefamily practice. During covid, the faculty has been extremely active working with divisions of family practice, hospitals and specialists to increase elective capacity but there still aren’t enough electives in many disciplines. Even in 1st and 2nd year, they struggle to find enough preceptors.
    As much as it is difficult to hear for pre-meds, BC just lacks capacity to start a new med school without reciprocally reducing capacity at UBC. This is why I think it was just an election promise full of buzz words that won’t turn in to anything in the near future. Maybe more residency seats, hopefully.
  14. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from IMislove in Simon Fraser University to Get BC's Second Medical School   
    As a 4th year UBC Med student, I don’t think there is any chance that this will actually happen for one reason: it makes no sense.
    It would take minimum 8-10 years to produce a single independent doctor if they started developing a new medical school today, compared to 2 years if they increased the number of residency seats and accepted more highly qualified IMGs.
    Secondly, there are barely enough residencies for current graduates and believe me, you don’t want to be >100k in debt in 4th year and scared you won’t match.
    Thirdly, UBC is already poised to fill the need for increased seats in Med school. In addition to having the IMP, SMP, and NMP, they are already in negotiations with Fraser Health to create a Fraser program, in which students in VFMP would be split and a subset complete their core clerkship (3rd year) based entirely out of the Fraser (expanding the number of sites that can be utilized within a reasonable commute).
    Finally, in 4th year there are already barely enough electives, especially in certain specialties likefamily practice. During covid, the faculty has been extremely active working with divisions of family practice, hospitals and specialists to increase elective capacity but there still aren’t enough electives in many disciplines. Even in 1st and 2nd year, they struggle to find enough preceptors.
    As much as it is difficult to hear for pre-meds, BC just lacks capacity to start a new med school without reciprocally reducing capacity at UBC. This is why I think it was just an election promise full of buzz words that won’t turn in to anything in the near future. Maybe more residency seats, hopefully.
  15. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from frenchpress in Anyone ONLY being considered for NMP?   
    No, it means that their scores are ineligible for admission to a ‘regular’ seat. The committee that oversees rural admissions can basically do whatever they want, so if someone has an amazing rural application but their scores are just below the regular cutoff, the committee can choose to interview them anyway.
    Even if you didn’t get an email, you’re still hypothetically in the running for an NMP seat, if that’s what you want.
    My hypothesis (unconfirmed) is that it is their method of filling the NMP with good quality rural candidates, since NMP is by far the least popular site and the rural seats in SMP and IMP are pretty easy to fill.
  16. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to Coldery in A flawed process?   
    If you talking strictly on the basis of commitment to this single volunteer group, understand too that people have their own lives and obligations. They may have other commitment(s) where they are already demonstrating the effort that you speak of for those that weren't interviewed or accepted.
    If you are talking about a situation where they demonstrate an outright lack of care or negligence then that would be different. Otherwise, you'd have to get the full view before coming to a conclusion. 
  17. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from Opichi in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
  18. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from marblestatue in Anyone ONLY being considered for NMP?   
    No, it means that their scores are ineligible for admission to a ‘regular’ seat. The committee that oversees rural admissions can basically do whatever they want, so if someone has an amazing rural application but their scores are just below the regular cutoff, the committee can choose to interview them anyway.
    Even if you didn’t get an email, you’re still hypothetically in the running for an NMP seat, if that’s what you want.
    My hypothesis (unconfirmed) is that it is their method of filling the NMP with good quality rural candidates, since NMP is by far the least popular site and the rural seats in SMP and IMP are pretty easy to fill.
  19. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I would agree that at the beginning of the year especially people go a bit overboard with partying, but it tapers down quite a bit after the first month (or maybe I just stopped going out, who knows). At the same time, there are lots of people who don't drink in our class and still attend events and have fun, and I haven't seen any judgement from others around drinking or not (both ways). 
    I think it can be difficult to come up with group activities once the weather turns, so it's easy to fall back on eating out, but yes that can get pricey after a while. Many groups who weren't outdoors-oriented did seasonal activities (UBC Farm apple festival, Halloween train in Stanley Park, Holiday festivals around christmas), or organized potlucks, games nights, sports watching events, etc. If you hear of anything going on, just ask to join! 
    I would also heavily encourage people to get involved with activity-related clubs - this year we started a culinary club to cook food, the Bhangra club is always amazing, and there's also games clubs, sports teams, choir, band, art, and other things so you should hopefully be able to find a group that you can meet some like-minded people in to do things that aren't related to med at all. 
  20. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to frenchpress in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I second this as a useful study strategy, particularly as you get further along. First semester everything is super new and it’s a new topic every week, so CBL can be overwhelming some times. But over the course of the first two years I spent less and less time on lectures, and more time focused on reading around the CBL cases, and I found it really helped my grades and my own ability to remember stuff long term.
  21. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    Sounds about right! Only change is that the spring FoS exam is during the finals season now (the last exam of year 1!) 
    I'm opposite to you in that I tried not going to lecture but just found myself getting further and further behind, also disengaged with the system! I like going to class partly as a social activity (don't discount that), and also to force myself into learning, but I would add that you need to come up with an active lecture plan so that you stay engaged (i.e. do not just passively listen/copy notes!) I found that trying to summarize information and come up with questions as the lecture goes on kept me engaged and helped with remembering things later on, but try some systems to see what works for you. 
    Also +1 on setting aside a weekend day/days to not do school. A weekend, weekend day, or weekday evening isn't going to make or break your career, so let yourself live in addition to being a student.
    Another thing I just thought of - it's easy to get by in cbl without doing anything, or by doing the bare minimum of prep (I know many who do this and have definitely done it myself some weeks). That being said, if you spend cbl prep time really understanding the physiology, background, and big concepts of the week, you'll not only be prepared for cbl, but it will really make things better to understand. I found that the weeks I was most engaged with cbl were the weeks I did best on in exams. This is especially true if the week is disorganized or not in your realm of interest.  
  22. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I really think this depends on your personality! For me, I found school much less stressful than undergrad/masters, but I tend to have a more relaxed person when it comes to knowing all the things, versus understanding what will be important for future practice. That being said, there are others in the class who seemed to be in a constant state of stress, because the amount of material thrown at you each day is ridiculous sometimes, so realistically, I think the stress will likely be whatever you allow it to be. Sorry if that's a non-committal answer but it's hard to speak for 300 people's mental state lol 
    The best advice around studying I can give you is to come up with a system for reviewing material throughout the week and understanding big concepts and physiology. If you get bogged down with the details it's going to drive you crazy (and always keep in mind that there's only ~2 questions on the midterm/final per lecture so if there's one lecture that is just completely over your head it's ok!). Try not to get behind on weeks, because it does add stress to the finals period, and if you can keep up with lab/histo you're going to thank yourself during the finals week (I did not do this and fully regret it). I was inconsistent with studying, some weeks a lot, some not at all, but I felt the best about my work/life balance when I spent ~1-2 hours each night reviewing the lectures from that day (M/W/F), and then did cbl and clin skills things in addition to that. 
  23. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
  24. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from DoctorArts in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
  25. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from skittles124 in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
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