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BoopityBoop

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  1. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from Docmcstuffins__ in Dating Profiles   
    1) You are assuming that women and female medical students freely choose work life-style friendly specialties and work less hours for themselves, without external influences/pressure. Many of the reasons for choosing life-style friendly specialties and working less hours is because they feel pressured to be the flexible one who can care for children/maintain a family - in the present or in the future. Women are at many times pressured to work less and therefore be paid less because of the responsibility that society put on them. 
    2) Just because women aren't locked out of these field, does not mean that it is just as easy for them to enter into these field as it is to enter the nursing profession or obgyn. 
    3) Women don't simply "tend to have different priorities", they grew up in a society where they are told their priorities are different from a man. In the 50's, it may have been about being a good mother and housewife. Today, society is more accepting of women entering STEM field, but only under the condition that it doesn't affect her ability to rear children and take care of their families.
    4) We need to consider the reasons these women are working part-time and more men aren't working part-time. I never suggested women shouldn't work part time. What I'm trying to say is that many times, they work part-time because they also have to balance their full-time job as a mom and home maker. We already address this problem in a similar context of clinician scientists, who can't take on as much clinical duties because they also do research. Departments will often pool a small proportion of billings from staff who are clinicians and use this as salaries for clinician scientists to help offset their disproportionate incomes. Even with this, clinician-scientists earn less than the sole clinicians, but the gap is somewhat reduced. This also happens in departments that value research and care for the work their clinician-scientist colleagues do.
    5) You don't recognize that there ISN'T equality of opportunities because you aren't a woman going through medical school, or practicing medicine. This is an article by CMAJ that explores why we don't have more women in leadership positions medicine, when there have been more females entering medicine than males in 1995, and consistently more in the last decade: https://cmajnews.com/2018/03/26/rise-of-women-in-medicine-not-matched-by-leadership-roles-cmaj-109-5567/

    6) I agree women nor man should be shamed for valuing family over career, but women are shamed for valuing career equally to their families. When men take more time for their families and decide to work less, they are seen as being a good husband and a good partner. When women take more time for their careers and less for their families, they are viewed as a less competent parent, and not welcomed in their leadership positions. Read the article by CMAJ above. 
    7) I never protested for equality in the # of women in individual specialties. I agree that entering specific fields such as Urology and Orthopedics is much easier for women in 2018 than it was back in 1980. But that doesn't mean that there's an even playing field. There are faculty who still believe that women shouldn't go into surgery, and there are faculty who are hesitant accepting female residents who are married or engaged and may choose to become pregnant during their residency/training. 
     
  2. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from targaryen in Getting jumped at Queen’s for being Asian   
    A "few years ago" is what?... 2011? 2015? 2016? 2017?! Frankly, a "few years ago" excuse is a cop-out in 2019. This behaviour wasn't excusable back then, and it definitely does not hold up now. 
    You may not have intended to frame it this way, but by saying "But yes it is appalling what has occurred in the past here" you are 1) excusing/defending the past and 2) making it sound as if it isn't a problem anymore. Students were protesting just 2 years ago for the administration's lack of action on racism. A culture of racism doesn't miraculously disappear in 2 years.
    Also, let's not deny that Queen's has a systemic problem, and holds a reputation for being white and elitist. It's not just "some" students who've been implicated, faculty members' racism have been publicized as well. I can only imagine how many more profs and students are only "subtly racist", but not racist enough for those affected to make a formal complaint about it.

    *after thought*
    I don't mean to suggest Queen's Med students are perpetuators of the systemic problem because, as we know, most of us go to which ever med school accepts us. But I think recognizing the problems of one's new community and trying to be part of the solution is an important part of being a good physician. If not for compelling moral reasons - at least for your CV and CaRMs sake. lol.
  3. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from yonas in Interventional Cardiology Vs General Surgery (Sub Spec)?   
    Just two points I think are worth considering from someone who has seen a loved one gone through the whole journey:
    Many are turned off by the training involved in Sx subspecialties, but I think it's important to remember the bigger picture. Sx training including fellowship is lets say 7-10 years, which in comparison to your entire career is not as big as you think. Lets say you finish all your training (at the latest) by 40, and you retire at 65. That's still 25 years you have to practice. I know this is simplistic view and easier said than done, but I think there is some merit to looking at this big picture. Isn't it the same reason many of us study/studied so hard and sacrifice things to get into medicine? So is it worth saving that 1 or 2 additional years of gruesome training for a career that ends up being a high paying job to pay for your lifestyle, family and hobbies? I can't say as that's for you to decide.
      As a student, everything new looks fascinating. The PCI's, and appendectomiess and cholecystectomies, all look exciting the first 10 times, maybe even 100 you see it/do it. But you have to remember that this novelty will eventually wear off and you'll be doing these bread and butter cases 1000's of times throughout the rest of your career. The question is, how much do you mind doing these bread and butters? Even trauma surgeons have to do tons of elective appendectomies and cholecystectomies throughout their career to make a living. During your clerkship, if you find it boring to watch another appendectomy or a cholecysteomy, or even close cases, general surgery may not be for you. This applies to any bread and butters in all subspecialties.  
    addendum to 1. Same idea applies to hating the atmosphere. Yes learning environment is important as a toxic and hostile environment can make an already difficult training that much worse. However remember that when you finish your training, you will get to choose where you work and what kind of work environment you want. And as I stated before, I know it's easier said than done, but it has been done by many before.
  4. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from MD4DM44 in Getting jumped at Queen’s for being Asian   
    A "few years ago" is what?... 2011? 2015? 2016? 2017?! Frankly, a "few years ago" excuse is a cop-out in 2019. This behaviour wasn't excusable back then, and it definitely does not hold up now. 
    You may not have intended to frame it this way, but by saying "But yes it is appalling what has occurred in the past here" you are 1) excusing/defending the past and 2) making it sound as if it isn't a problem anymore. Students were protesting just 2 years ago for the administration's lack of action on racism. A culture of racism doesn't miraculously disappear in 2 years.
    Also, let's not deny that Queen's has a systemic problem, and holds a reputation for being white and elitist. It's not just "some" students who've been implicated, faculty members' racism have been publicized as well. I can only imagine how many more profs and students are only "subtly racist", but not racist enough for those affected to make a formal complaint about it.

    *after thought*
    I don't mean to suggest Queen's Med students are perpetuators of the systemic problem because, as we know, most of us go to which ever med school accepts us. But I think recognizing the problems of one's new community and trying to be part of the solution is an important part of being a good physician. If not for compelling moral reasons - at least for your CV and CaRMs sake. lol.
  5. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to Intrepid86 in RN applying to med school: low GPA; what are my options??   
    As someone who went to the Caribbean and was successful, I have never recommended this path to anyone. Those who require a supportive learning environment will not find one there, and those who can't adequately cope with stress won't survive the examination gauntlet, nor last the four years of uncertainty before their shot at matching and wondering if the investment was worth it. The logistics of moving around, as well as the relative isolation and change in lifestyle also catch many off guard. This option requires due diligence and some deep self-reflection before even considering. Good luck.
  6. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to Rahvin13 in RN applying to med school: low GPA; what are my options??   
    For those suggesting NP, you will be extremely hard pressed to find a NP program who will admit a 2.3 nursing gpa, I don’t know of any in Canada honestly  (I’m a RN who is debating between NP and MD). Most programs require a 3.0-3.5 minimum. And usually the minimum won’t get you accepted. I don’t actually think that’s an option for OP anyways.
    OP in my opinion if you want to pursue med in Canada or US you will need a second undergrad or enough full time credits in a 2nd undergrad to improve your gpa to an acceptable level. Even overseas/carrib schools will be hard to get accepted with a 2.3.
  7. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from retrograde in Getting jumped at Queen’s for being Asian   
    A "few years ago" is what?... 2011? 2015? 2016? 2017?! Frankly, a "few years ago" excuse is a cop-out in 2019. This behaviour wasn't excusable back then, and it definitely does not hold up now. 
    You may not have intended to frame it this way, but by saying "But yes it is appalling what has occurred in the past here" you are 1) excusing/defending the past and 2) making it sound as if it isn't a problem anymore. Students were protesting just 2 years ago for the administration's lack of action on racism. A culture of racism doesn't miraculously disappear in 2 years.
    Also, let's not deny that Queen's has a systemic problem, and holds a reputation for being white and elitist. It's not just "some" students who've been implicated, faculty members' racism have been publicized as well. I can only imagine how many more profs and students are only "subtly racist", but not racist enough for those affected to make a formal complaint about it.

    *after thought*
    I don't mean to suggest Queen's Med students are perpetuators of the systemic problem because, as we know, most of us go to which ever med school accepts us. But I think recognizing the problems of one's new community and trying to be part of the solution is an important part of being a good physician. If not for compelling moral reasons - at least for your CV and CaRMs sake. lol.
  8. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to JohnGrisham in Med school in US then coming to Canada   
    Discussed many times, read those "Confusing" posts, the information is there and not *that* confusing   You can do it, if you're considering spending 300k+ on a USMD, you owe it to yourself to be informed as possible.
  9. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to GrouchoMarx in Job opportunities in ENT and urology   
    pathology is the exact same
  10. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from indefatigable in quebec and carms   
    Let's not make Quebec or any group of people/demographic a scapegoat and martyr for a multi-factorial problem. Pointing fingers and saying "one group of people is the major problem for something" is very unlikely to be true and more unlikely to actually solve the underlying issue. 

    The core issue of the problems with CaRMs is the past decreases in the number of spots for residency programs. This is a problem we have to solve together as a community in collaboration with various governing bodies.
  11. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to indefatigable in quebec and carms   
    I don't think there's much to be balanced about - it was a pretty inflammatory post.  

    My point was pretty simple - if you actually look at the numbers, there's hardly any QC graduates that do leave, except perhaps McGill graduates.  The logic you are suggesting can also applied to USMGs within the AFMC document.  In either case, there's only a marginal effect.  

    As a side, the current QC premier and other politicans have long been unhappy about med grads leaving QC (esp McGill) and have in the past suggested financial penalties.  So perhaps there's some common ground between the OP and premier.  

    https://www.ledevoir.com/politique/quebec/357986/les-medecins-qui-quittent-le-quebec-doivent-rembourser-l-etat-dit-legault

    Perhaps a more constructive way to look at the issue is to look at the provincial ratio of residency spots/med students.  UBC and Memorial are famously 1:1 and Ontario is about that.  NS is well above that at about 1.5:1, if I recall correctly.  
     
  12. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to la marzocco in quebec and carms   
    You can't just ban graduates from a particular province from entering carms outside their province. Quebec medical graduates are more bilingual than anglophones from ROC so that's why they can match ROC as well as to their francophone schools. And tbh, they have to write an English language test for some residency programs in ROC as well (e.g., UBC). If your French is up to snuff, by all means apply to the 3 French schools for residency, no one is stopping you. We need to stop this divisive language. 
    To that end, why not each province administer it's own match then? You really go against the grain of ensuring mobility across the province and ensuring the best match between candidates and programs nationally. 
    To be balanced, I understand @#YOLO's logic, @tere. The report released by AFMC reads: "There is a higher proportion of Quebec graduates who match outside of Quebec than graduates from the rest of Canada who match to a residency program in Quebec." 
    Read the notes please: "Compared to all other provinces, Quebec has the lowest percentage of its matched applicants leaving to a position outside Quebec in 2017; almost 90% of Quebec graduates matched to a residency program within the province."
    Please stop misinformation and be happy about the vibrant bilingualism this country offers.
     
  13. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to indefatigable in quebec and carms   
    I'm not sure where you're getting your facts, but this goes against pretty much all available evidence.  It's disappointing you posted this.
    The "Quebec Invasion": there were a grand total of 17+2+2=21 graduates of French-speaking med schools matching out-of-province.  That's less than the number of USMGs that matched into CaRMS (24).  Maybe it's more of a US invasion?  McGill is like other English-speaking med-schools, which have lots of graduates leave the province.      
     
    https://www.carms.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/r1_tbl29e_2018.pdf
     
  14. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from targaryen in Dating Profiles   
    1) You are assuming that women and female medical students freely choose work life-style friendly specialties and work less hours for themselves, without external influences/pressure. Many of the reasons for choosing life-style friendly specialties and working less hours is because they feel pressured to be the flexible one who can care for children/maintain a family - in the present or in the future. Women are at many times pressured to work less and therefore be paid less because of the responsibility that society put on them. 
    2) Just because women aren't locked out of these field, does not mean that it is just as easy for them to enter into these field as it is to enter the nursing profession or obgyn. 
    3) Women don't simply "tend to have different priorities", they grew up in a society where they are told their priorities are different from a man. In the 50's, it may have been about being a good mother and housewife. Today, society is more accepting of women entering STEM field, but only under the condition that it doesn't affect her ability to rear children and take care of their families.
    4) We need to consider the reasons these women are working part-time and more men aren't working part-time. I never suggested women shouldn't work part time. What I'm trying to say is that many times, they work part-time because they also have to balance their full-time job as a mom and home maker. We already address this problem in a similar context of clinician scientists, who can't take on as much clinical duties because they also do research. Departments will often pool a small proportion of billings from staff who are clinicians and use this as salaries for clinician scientists to help offset their disproportionate incomes. Even with this, clinician-scientists earn less than the sole clinicians, but the gap is somewhat reduced. This also happens in departments that value research and care for the work their clinician-scientist colleagues do.
    5) You don't recognize that there ISN'T equality of opportunities because you aren't a woman going through medical school, or practicing medicine. This is an article by CMAJ that explores why we don't have more women in leadership positions medicine, when there have been more females entering medicine than males in 1995, and consistently more in the last decade: https://cmajnews.com/2018/03/26/rise-of-women-in-medicine-not-matched-by-leadership-roles-cmaj-109-5567/

    6) I agree women nor man should be shamed for valuing family over career, but women are shamed for valuing career equally to their families. When men take more time for their families and decide to work less, they are seen as being a good husband and a good partner. When women take more time for their careers and less for their families, they are viewed as a less competent parent, and not welcomed in their leadership positions. Read the article by CMAJ above. 
    7) I never protested for equality in the # of women in individual specialties. I agree that entering specific fields such as Urology and Orthopedics is much easier for women in 2018 than it was back in 1980. But that doesn't mean that there's an even playing field. There are faculty who still believe that women shouldn't go into surgery, and there are faculty who are hesitant accepting female residents who are married or engaged and may choose to become pregnant during their residency/training. 
     
  15. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to Edict in Advice on Proceeding After First Year   
    If we assume that med students are the top of premeds just like CS/eng grads who go to the valley are the top of CS/eng grads, then we can compare like to like. I have felt comfortable comparing them like this because my friends all had similar grades to me in school and I have several examples rather than just one or two. 
    But if we do compare them, the earning potential would outstrip physicians because by the time most doctors (assuming you specialize finish residency/fellowship/grad school), they will be in their early 30s. By that time most CS/eng grads in the valley would have made 230-350k a yr for nearly a decade. If invested this would be a huge difference in final income. Not to even account for the fact that residents work longer hours and have less free time, which is a huge factor in quality of life. 
    What I am trying to say though isn't to compare these numbers its to say that people paint a way rosier picture of medicine than it is in reality. I would always try to keep my options open for as long as I could, before making a decision. I think you are in the situation where you can do that. If you look at the stats for Mac Med. https://mdprogram.mcmaster.ca/docs/default-source/admissions/classof2018.pdf?sfvrsn=2 it gives you a general sense. Don't forget though that GPA is king. No one cares what you do for your undergrad. Very few engineers get 3.9+ GPAs, but you were able to, which means you are likely one of those 1-3 people who get into Med from Eng each year. 
  16. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to Edict in Advice on Proceeding After First Year   
    If you ask me you should stay in CS and not do medicine. I have friends in CS/EE who graduated undergrad and got jobs in silicon valley making 230k CAD a year starting working 40 hours a week. If you choose medicine you will won't realistically start making any income until 26, and then you'll start at about 60k working 40-100 hour weeks depending the specialty you choose. 
    The reason i'm saying this is, you've transferred once and now you want to transfer again and you are only in 2nd year of undergrad. Why not just stick it out, your GPA is amazing, the fact that you got 3.96 in first year eng and 3.85 in comp sci is already proof you can do well. There are many people in med school who did their degree in engineering. Since you are capable of getting the GPA in a hard major, don't switch, stick with it and keep your CS and medical school dreams alive. 
     
  17. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from Bluecolorisnice in Robert Chu--Unmatched Doctor Commits Suicide   
    Comments about the article:

    1. I agree with everyone here that this was a very unfortunate incidence. That being said, I think there is more to this story and this individual. Not matching for 2 years, while very unfortunate, should not be the sole reason for someone committing suicide. I don't think this is either the victim's problem or the system's problem but I do hope that the school takes this seriously and considers, "did we do everything to support this individual and prevent future individuals from committing suicide?" The school may not have prepared their students for these potential outcomes, the student may not have been mentally equipped to deal with failure, etc etc.
    2. I did not appreciate the way that the article made it sound like people who went unmatched is entirely a system's issue. "Chu and a growing number of others denied access to residency have found themselves..." This sounds like ALL residency programs reject applicants. It does not take into account the algorithm, and how luck plays into it all, and how it actually favours the applicants at the end. It also does not take into account how some applicants REFUSE to apply outside of specific location or province, despite repeated counselling.
    3. (related to 1st part). I wonder how and why the individual decided to go from radiology to fm/psych to earning an MBA. I wonder how many decisions he made were from his own personal choices, or from strong encouragement from others (i.e. parents, school counsellors, other faculty)

    Comment about residency positions (latter half of the comments):

    I do think we have a problem in Canada of not addressing the problem of what we define as "IMG". We state that we offer "IMG" positions and set a quota, yet a lot of the competition involves CSAs (canadians studying abroad). This is not only misleading to IMG's, but also to the Canadian public who believe all these IMG positions go to actual immigrant physicians. I suggested this before and I want to reiterate it here: If we want to set a quota for CSA's, we should make this clear and separate this from actual IMG positions. But I doubt that this would fly politically.
  18. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from Koopatroopa in Dating Profiles   
    Woah. I think you're greatly misinformed.

    First of all, gender pay gap is well and alive. I don't know what sources you're citing when you suggest women out earn men, but that is not the case in medicine, or  in Canada.

    A state-by-state breakdown of the striking gender gap in doctors’ pay:
    https://www.statnews.com/2017/04/26/gender-pay-gap-medicine/
    Sex Differences in Physician Sex Differences in Physician Salary in US Public Medical Schools: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2532788
    Canada's Gender Pay Gap: Why Canadian Women Still Earn Less Than Men
    https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/03/08/canada-gender-pay-gap_n_9393924.html

    Second of all, I never stated that this only applied to marrying a woman. I clearly stated that whoever a physician decides to marry, MAN or WOMAN, has the option to not work if they don't want too. This doesn't only apply to raising kids, or mean that they would become trophy husbands/wives (although that is an extreme possibility).
    Even as a guy, marrying a physician (male or female) gives you financial stability so that you can:
    Decide to go back to school if you want to - i.e. change professions, pursue a master's, PhD Quit you current position to look for a better one - won't have to worry about rent, food, and living expenses. Don't have to work crazy hours at any job to save for a nice family vacation, for a downpayment on a house, or to eat at a nice restaurant There are so many adults who wish they had the luxury to do these things when they want too, without having to worry about $$$. Many simply can't because they may have just bought a house with their partner, or they just had a new born with their partner, or they need the income their current crap position provides. 

    So is a partner's occupation the primary reason for ending up with someone? No (exception - gold diggers). Being a physician in North America, regardless of gender and specialty, means you have an enormous earning potential. You can work the average hours and have a very comfortable living for your family OR you can also work additional hours and earn into the millions. Most specialties in medicine can be made lucrative if you wanted it to be.
  19. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from catlady403 in Dating Profiles   
    1) You are assuming that women and female medical students freely choose work life-style friendly specialties and work less hours for themselves, without external influences/pressure. Many of the reasons for choosing life-style friendly specialties and working less hours is because they feel pressured to be the flexible one who can care for children/maintain a family - in the present or in the future. Women are at many times pressured to work less and therefore be paid less because of the responsibility that society put on them. 
    2) Just because women aren't locked out of these field, does not mean that it is just as easy for them to enter into these field as it is to enter the nursing profession or obgyn. 
    3) Women don't simply "tend to have different priorities", they grew up in a society where they are told their priorities are different from a man. In the 50's, it may have been about being a good mother and housewife. Today, society is more accepting of women entering STEM field, but only under the condition that it doesn't affect her ability to rear children and take care of their families.
    4) We need to consider the reasons these women are working part-time and more men aren't working part-time. I never suggested women shouldn't work part time. What I'm trying to say is that many times, they work part-time because they also have to balance their full-time job as a mom and home maker. We already address this problem in a similar context of clinician scientists, who can't take on as much clinical duties because they also do research. Departments will often pool a small proportion of billings from staff who are clinicians and use this as salaries for clinician scientists to help offset their disproportionate incomes. Even with this, clinician-scientists earn less than the sole clinicians, but the gap is somewhat reduced. This also happens in departments that value research and care for the work their clinician-scientist colleagues do.
    5) You don't recognize that there ISN'T equality of opportunities because you aren't a woman going through medical school, or practicing medicine. This is an article by CMAJ that explores why we don't have more women in leadership positions medicine, when there have been more females entering medicine than males in 1995, and consistently more in the last decade: https://cmajnews.com/2018/03/26/rise-of-women-in-medicine-not-matched-by-leadership-roles-cmaj-109-5567/

    6) I agree women nor man should be shamed for valuing family over career, but women are shamed for valuing career equally to their families. When men take more time for their families and decide to work less, they are seen as being a good husband and a good partner. When women take more time for their careers and less for their families, they are viewed as a less competent parent, and not welcomed in their leadership positions. Read the article by CMAJ above. 
    7) I never protested for equality in the # of women in individual specialties. I agree that entering specific fields such as Urology and Orthopedics is much easier for women in 2018 than it was back in 1980. But that doesn't mean that there's an even playing field. There are faculty who still believe that women shouldn't go into surgery, and there are faculty who are hesitant accepting female residents who are married or engaged and may choose to become pregnant during their residency/training. 
     
  20. Like
    BoopityBoop got a reaction from F508 in Dating Profiles   
    1) You are assuming that women and female medical students freely choose work life-style friendly specialties and work less hours for themselves, without external influences/pressure. Many of the reasons for choosing life-style friendly specialties and working less hours is because they feel pressured to be the flexible one who can care for children/maintain a family - in the present or in the future. Women are at many times pressured to work less and therefore be paid less because of the responsibility that society put on them. 
    2) Just because women aren't locked out of these field, does not mean that it is just as easy for them to enter into these field as it is to enter the nursing profession or obgyn. 
    3) Women don't simply "tend to have different priorities", they grew up in a society where they are told their priorities are different from a man. In the 50's, it may have been about being a good mother and housewife. Today, society is more accepting of women entering STEM field, but only under the condition that it doesn't affect her ability to rear children and take care of their families.
    4) We need to consider the reasons these women are working part-time and more men aren't working part-time. I never suggested women shouldn't work part time. What I'm trying to say is that many times, they work part-time because they also have to balance their full-time job as a mom and home maker. We already address this problem in a similar context of clinician scientists, who can't take on as much clinical duties because they also do research. Departments will often pool a small proportion of billings from staff who are clinicians and use this as salaries for clinician scientists to help offset their disproportionate incomes. Even with this, clinician-scientists earn less than the sole clinicians, but the gap is somewhat reduced. This also happens in departments that value research and care for the work their clinician-scientist colleagues do.
    5) You don't recognize that there ISN'T equality of opportunities because you aren't a woman going through medical school, or practicing medicine. This is an article by CMAJ that explores why we don't have more women in leadership positions medicine, when there have been more females entering medicine than males in 1995, and consistently more in the last decade: https://cmajnews.com/2018/03/26/rise-of-women-in-medicine-not-matched-by-leadership-roles-cmaj-109-5567/

    6) I agree women nor man should be shamed for valuing family over career, but women are shamed for valuing career equally to their families. When men take more time for their families and decide to work less, they are seen as being a good husband and a good partner. When women take more time for their careers and less for their families, they are viewed as a less competent parent, and not welcomed in their leadership positions. Read the article by CMAJ above. 
    7) I never protested for equality in the # of women in individual specialties. I agree that entering specific fields such as Urology and Orthopedics is much easier for women in 2018 than it was back in 1980. But that doesn't mean that there's an even playing field. There are faculty who still believe that women shouldn't go into surgery, and there are faculty who are hesitant accepting female residents who are married or engaged and may choose to become pregnant during their residency/training. 
     
  21. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to GrouchoMarx in Dating Profiles   
    i do because im an average looking ethnic guy which means im below average in the dating world.
    if youre a good looking white fellow you can probably leave it out.
    i find that, beyond it attracting the golddiggers, it can draw other professionals to you, as we are a rare commodity in the world of online dating.
  22. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to medigeek in Dating Profiles   
    True though a physician making 250k a year is essentially the top 1% of income. Most of the guys who did well/do well in dating aren't in any glamorous profession but rather work a half decent job paying 50k. 
  23. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to indefatigable in Dating Profiles   
    .
  24. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to indefatigable in Dating Profiles   
    .
  25. Like
    BoopityBoop reacted to freewheeler in CMPA fees by specialty   
    It's the price neurologists pay for wearing unfashionable bow ties to work.
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