Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

frenchpress

Members
  • Content Count

    866
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    5

Reputation Activity

  1. Thanks
    frenchpress got a reaction from who_knows in Deadline for reference letters   
    No, you aren’t missing anything. There’s just no perfect answer, and what works best will vary by person, specialty applying to, school schedule, etc. For example, some people prefer to have important electives late so they have the most experience and perceive that as giving the best chance at getting a good letter. Some people prefer to have electives early when they’re more fresh off vacation, or because they still are deciding between specialties. Depending on how competitive electives are for the specialty you’re applying to, there’s a good chance you end up taking what you can get when you can get it. You also should have more options for letters than the bare minimum - what if the elective you thought would give you the perfect letter doesn’t go that well? You need to have options. 
    And yes, in theory, a month should be plenty of time for preceptors to write a letter. Do the vast majority get them in on time? Yes. Do some leave it until the last possible minute and stress students to the maximum? Yes. Do some actually flake and end up not responding or submitting it late (either intentionally or not). Yes. I’ve seen it all. 
  2. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Bambi in Deadline for reference letters   
    No, you aren’t missing anything. There’s just no perfect answer, and what works best will vary by person, specialty applying to, school schedule, etc. For example, some people prefer to have important electives late so they have the most experience and perceive that as giving the best chance at getting a good letter. Some people prefer to have electives early when they’re more fresh off vacation, or because they still are deciding between specialties. Depending on how competitive electives are for the specialty you’re applying to, there’s a good chance you end up taking what you can get when you can get it. You also should have more options for letters than the bare minimum - what if the elective you thought would give you the perfect letter doesn’t go that well? You need to have options. 
    And yes, in theory, a month should be plenty of time for preceptors to write a letter. Do the vast majority get them in on time? Yes. Do some leave it until the last possible minute and stress students to the maximum? Yes. Do some actually flake and end up not responding or submitting it late (either intentionally or not). Yes. I’ve seen it all. 
  3. Like
  4. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Amanda1664 in Verifier for jobs while in highschool but cannot contact employer?   
    Just include a coworker (friend) or family member, and explain in the box provided that the business is no longer in existence. Worst case scenario they won’t include it. Lots of people use friends and family to verify in appropriate situations (personal hobbies, etc)
  5. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from fourierisnotmyfriend in What are typical hours working in Family Medicine?   
    Medicine is hard and interesting work that comes with a lot of responsibility. That does not have to translate into more ‘hours’, nor should it in all cases. It is a huge logical fallacy to assert that more hours worked necessarily translates into being a better and more effective worker. And you risk doing a huge disservice to patients if you assume that has to be true and then completely burn yourself out.
    I am not saying people shouldn’t work a lot of hours if they like it and feel they can do it safely and effectively. I am just saying that being a good doctor != working more than everyone else in society all the time.
  6. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Bambi in Verifier for jobs while in highschool but cannot contact employer?   
    Just include a coworker (friend) or family member, and explain in the box provided that the business is no longer in existence. Worst case scenario they won’t include it. Lots of people use friends and family to verify in appropriate situations (personal hobbies, etc)
  7. Like
  8. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from LostLamb in Chillest FM Programs in Canada (Schools and specific sites)   
    You’ll get the best information about things like call and work-life balance from residents of these programs, but some of the info you want people may not want to publicly post. It’s also an absurdly large amount of information - I had to keep a spreadsheet last year during CaRMS to keep it all straight. For stuff like #weeks of block and elective time, that’s available for the majority of sites on the archived CaRMS program descriptions from last year and/or on the university pages for each site (at least it is for UBC). 
    You’ll have the opportunity in CaRMS to do zoom sessions (UBC last year had several at every site) - you’ll be able to get a lot of that information in those sessions, and get contact info for residents who may be willing to talk to you off the cuff about the programs one-on-one.
  9. Like
    frenchpress reacted to ellorie in Do anxiety meds have any bearing on licensing applications, insurance?   
    Get disability insurance right now, especially if you haven’t been diagnosed or treated yet. Like, immediately. 
     
    With CPSO there really is no concrete info. It’s about the diagnosis, not the treatment - they ask if you’ve ever been diagnosed with a condition that could interfere with your ability to practice medicine. It’s a personal judgment call whether to disclose for most people with psych stuff. If you’ve taken a leave you will probably end up needing to, if not it’s a conversation with your treating physician. Most people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety disorders I think choose not to disclose. 
  10. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Bambi in Do anxiety meds have any bearing on licensing applications, insurance?   
    I am not sure about CPSO. But you should definitely consider getting disability insurance now if you think you will have issues in the future. On private plans like RBC, which seems to be one of the most popular, there’s an exclusion for claims for several years for pre-existing conditions (2-5 years for my plan depending on the issues), but after that you can typically make a claim if you need to. So the sooner you get it, the sooner it is likely to be available if you need it. Provincial group plans typically also have cheap student insurance, although I’ve heard OMA recently went way up in price. 
    In BC Hasslet is a popular broker with students and physicians. Ask around at your school and find a recommended broker there who knows physician disability insurance to talk to. 
  11. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from AQ6 in NAQ review   
    I would recommend proper sentence structures, just try to be brief, simple and specific. I know it’s challenging, and all the details seem important -  but if you can’t fit the key aspects of the activity into the character limit, you’re almost certainly including extraneous information. 
  12. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Snowmen in Chillest FM Programs in Canada (Schools and specific sites)   
    That has nothing to do with the hours worked, though. As you mentioned, the problem with urban family medicine programs is the pyramid. What you want is a rural program where you're gonna work a lot to get maximal exposure.
    As mentioned by jb24, your residency is only 2 years in family medicine and even with the most rigorous program, you won't learn everything. What you're looking for is a program that's the gonna make the proportion of things you don't know as small as possible and chill programs won't give you that. Once you're an attending, there's no one to catch the things you miss (and that's not a consultant's job).
    Edit: Just realised I wrote "you won't learn anything" while I meant to write "you won't learn everything"
  13. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from chilli in Approach to contacting Research supervisor   
    It can come across as ingenuine. But also really increases the risk that you end up going back and forth talking to them about a project you have zero interest in. Or worse, end up working on something you didn’t realize you have no interest in. That’s just as much a waste of your time and everyone else’s, potentially more so. 
  14. Like
    frenchpress reacted to medigeek in Chillest FM Programs in Canada (Schools and specific sites)   
    Even if you're 100% set on outpatient only for the rest of your life (people have done 180 degree changes on this btw), at least make sure the program provides very strong training in that. If you're just going to be referring everything out and doing refills/diabetes/hypertension in residency; you won't be a very competent doctor. Poor inpatient training also makes you not as strong outpatient, as an fyi. I do agree that Ob isn't that necessary if it isn't something you'll be doing.
  15. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from LostLamb in Chillest FM Programs in Canada (Schools and specific sites)   
    Disagree about UofA FM not being chill. I am in this residency right now, and have found it to be pretty well balanced between chill and busy, with the busy stuff mostly being worth my time. Wellness seems very important over all to the faculty. 
    Work hours and call vary a lot by rotation. We spend ~11-12 blocks (4 weeks each) over two years in office-based family practice, 2-5 months of which is rural (your choice). In my home family practice I work 6 hour days 2-3 days per week, and 8 hour days the rest. There’s quite a bit of flexibility for horizontal ‘electives’/activities during FM in first year, and options to integrate in hospitalist, psych, palliative to gain extra elective time. Call can be minimal to almost non-existent during these blocks, depending on what you choose to do. Obs is also integrated into family blocks, and while it varies a bit between sites, overall can be quite minimal - at my site we schedule our own Obs call, and you can do as much or as little as you want really. There’s also 3 blocks of Emerg, which I personally find quite chill, since you only end up with about 4 shifts a week. 
    There are some heavier blocks. You have to do a block each at least of CTU, CCU, and surgery, which do have heavier call, but as @JohnGrisham mentioned, these are the things that will help you become more competent if you think you might want to do any hospitalist/Emerg. It’s easy enough to just do outpatient family once you finish a tougher residency, but it’s hard to go the other direction and pick up those skills if your residency is ‘too’ chill or outpatient focused.
    Happy to talk more about specifics of the program and my experiences if you want to DM me. 
  16. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Edict in General surgery most high yield operations   
    In the smaller community centres i have worked in they tend to be very general: All the classic abdominal surgeries (appy, chole, hernia repairs, bowel resections and ostomies), breast biopsies and mastectomies, upper and lower scopes, and some ambulatory procedures (like carpel tunnel, visectomy, hemorrhoids, more complicated ganglion/derm excisions, etc). Most of the stuff mentioned above. 
  17. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Snake in Waitlist Party 2020/2021   
    When can I expect to receive my rejection so I can move on with my life? Lol
  18. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from askingquestions in What are some good home office chairs for studying in med school?   
    I got a aeron in medical school and the expense was 100% worth it. You can often find used standard models for a fraction of the original cost at office closing sales (we had one previously we got this way), but it was worth it to me to get one specifically sized for me with some extra features.
  19. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Arztin in ER work after CCFP ..... do I have what it takes to work in the ER ?   
    Hi there, my case is most likely more of an exception than the general rule. I finished FM with 3 extra months (not in a ccfp em program) and now I work in 2 high volume EDs in large urban community settings, where we see paeds at both sites, and one being a level 2 trauma center and the other is not a designated trauma center.
    I pretty much did the equivalent of about 15 months of EM by the time I finished FM residency.  I took as many EM electives as possible, as well as extra shifts as I could during residency (as in shifts outside of my workhours pro bono). I did my residency in a smaller city with a high volume ED with fairly frequent sick trauma patients. I did as many EM electives as possible in different academic centers. I did as many CME and procedure courses as I could through my training. Pretty much read about 85-90% of the Rosen's. I did 3 months of adult ICU during residency towards the end in large ICU units in the community. Intubated about 70-80 times by the time I was done.
    It's been almost a year that I'm a staff now and I can say that I really feel like a staff since perhaps only a month or two. Every week I see something I've never seen or heard of before. Working as an attending is truly something else. On my first shift, I had a myasthenic crisis. My first code ever in my first month of practice in the ED was a 40 year old with a massive PE that coded that I thrombolyzed empirically who luckily enough survived without any sequelae. I've been humbled countless times. Despite everything I did before starting as a staff, the learning curve this year was definitely insane, especially in the first 4-5 months. Am I comfortable? No. I don't think one can ever really get fully comfortable in the ED. There are certainly things I have never done or not feeling super comfortable with. There are certainly things that are so rare that even if you did 5 years of residency, you might not have encountered it during your training.
    In general, I don't recommend doing EM full time EM after a FM residency, esp if you want to work in a bigger hospital and do EM full time. The training is just not sufficient IMO for the average FM trainee who does the bare minimum.
    Now if you will do EM full time after FM, I would recommend you the following:
    For many FM programs, you can prolong your residency by 3 months, which is what I did. Try to see if you can do that in order to have more elective time. Apply for the EM year if possible, or the SAEM (?) or what's it's called, if you are in ON. In ON, I thought they also have a mentorship program for the first 3 months if you work in the ED after FM?
    Try taking as many courses as you can. Airway courses, CME, resusc, CASTED POCUS procedure courses etc... Start by looking at the courses on the CAEP website. Yeah it costs $$$ but you are investing in yourself.
    Do as many rotations as possible in ED, paeds ED, ICU, and related rotations. Most high yield would be anesthesia and ortho, and whatever you feel weaker (cardio, IM consults etc..). Do as many procedures as possible. The 2 most important life-saving procedures that you absolutely need to know are intubations and chest tubes I would say. You simply cannot do EM if you don't know how to intubate. (Although certain extremely remote hospitals don't have that kind of volume, so anesthesia does it, but otherwise, you need to know). Depending where you work, most likely you won't insert the central line yourself so it's not as important. Knowing how to apply plaster splints and the most common reductions are fairly important too (wrist Fx, shoulder dislocation, ankle Fx-dislocation).
    I would argue that it's important to build a solid foundation of knowledge before reading blogs (emcrit emrap etc...) and the latest articles. Either Rosen's or Tintinalli is a must IMO. It's dry and boring, but there is a reason board exams are based on these books. It takes time but it's definitely a must.
    Do as many shifts as you can. I don't know how it works in your province, but throughout residency and clerkship, I asked to do extra outside of rotation hours. I did quite a lot of extra ED shifts pro bono and I don't regret it at all. I learned tons by doing that. Preceptors usually won't say no if you are someone motivated who goes there to learn.
    At this point, if it's your final year of residency, you are learning for yourself. There is no such thing as going above and beyond to try to learn as much as possible.
     
  20. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from 1D7 in Does elective order matter?   
    No.  Elective order happens for all kinds of reasons, what will effect your changes is how effective you are at selling your interest in family med in your app, overall number of family electives, etc. 
  21. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Snowmen in Pretty tame surgery rotation so far, anything I'm missing out on? (minimal interest in surgery)   
    For the specialties you're mentioning, I'd say your highest yield move would be to try to see as many ER consults as you can. This way, you'll see different presentations and will be better at realising "something's not right" when you're seeing a patient at a walk-in clinic or the ER as an IM consultant.
  22. Like
    frenchpress reacted to premed72 in how do people get through FRCPC residences?   
    Doing something you hate for 30+ years would kinda suck 
  23. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Snowmen in how do people get through FRCPC residences?   
    Exactly, working very hard. I could make roughly 800k in my "low-paying specialty" while working 8-to-5 without call and taking 40 minutes for new patients and 20 minutes for follow-ups.
    You officially have a PhD in nitpicking.
    You simply have to look at the numbers: if you're billing 40$ for a follow-up instead of 100-150$, you'll have to work harder. Simple.
  24. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from merci in Entering medical school with a mortgage   
    This isn’t strictly true. I know of one person in BC who could not get a full LOC, and they were told it was because they had other loans and their recent credit had some major issues. Although I also know of people who could get an LOC with a mortgage, and vice versa, and presumably they had better credit. 
    Presumably OP if you just qualified for a big mortgage your credit is OK. But I recommend reaching out to one of the healthcare specialists at the local banks and chatting with them about it. Do not just ask random advisers at the bank, they rarely know anything. There are some very knowledgeable advisers for the healthcare LOCs  at the RBC at UBC. 
  25. Like
    frenchpress reacted to shikimate in Matching into family without an elective?   
    It's possible with pathology programs that aren't popular, although I doubt you'll last in the program if you have zero interest. It's not a good idea to match to something very niche like pathology without some interest/appreciation for the work, lest you turn yourself into one of those zombie residents for the 5 years. 
×
×
  • Create New...