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Intrepid86

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Intrepid86 last won the day on July 4 2020

Intrepid86 had the most liked content!

About Intrepid86

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  1. I successfully matched after going through the Caribbean route. Not recommended.
  2. Most of the people I know who trained in the States ended up staying there. The most likely reason being they enjoyed their time, and ultimately found more things they liked than didn't. If you're worried about the one extra year of training for FM, then I would say it shouldn't even be a consideration.
  3. Let me tell you a few things about writing personal statements. The following is just my opinion only. You can have amazing achievements, but still have a poor, uncompelling statement. How you write is just as important (if not more) than the content that's being written about. I can take a below average student and make them sound absolutely incredible. The admissions committee already has your CV, but what they don't know is your unique view of the specialty, why it's important, your commitment, suitability, and other things that have little to do with what you've actually accomplished.
  4. The increasing stress over FM is largely from instances of candidates who applied for competitive specialties but got rejected from Family. Even this forum has multiple examples of people who matched to their FM backup, only to become instantly dismayed and find all avenues to leave it. This why FM programs have been trending towards a slightly harder stance on those whom they don't think are committed. Rejecting at least some applicants is actually doing them a favor. If all you're concerned about is your FM application showing a few more peds rotations, then don't worry about.
  5. It is a clear conflict of interest for pharmacists to be both the prescriber and dispenser. Also, what they assess and assume is a "minor illness" may in fact turn out to be something more significant.
  6. They don't dislike you. They just don't know you. Being with someone for one and a half days isn't long enough to write anything meaningful.
  7. There's nothing wrong with taking a break if you're tired, but why does it have to be an entire year? I'm going to make the reasonable assumption that there's something else going on, e.g., application/match anxiety, insufficient sleep, disliking medicine etc. Do some self reflection and face the real reason head on.
  8. Affirmative Action exists in Canadian medical schools, even if they prefer not to call it that. Separate streams are often devoted to certain groups because admissions departments are worried those individuals will be outcompeted if left in the general applicant pool.
  9. I like how they listed "spirit of adventure" as being necessary to do rural medicine. The people who designed this rubric obviously practice in an urban area.
  10. This is just curiosity, but how long have you been practicing for?
  11. Specialty training is longer, but if you're going to be practicing for 30 years anyways, then it shouldn't be a huge factor in your decision not to pursue it.
  12. Even with the second study, only 11 Canadians participated, and most of the 22 people in total weren't even in the final year of their program, where individual disparities, if present, in perception and treatment have largely disappeared. The study is primarily focusing on some difficulties inherent in their transition to residency, in order to better support them, which is understandable since they come from having trained in outside medical systems. Once people become senior residents and Attendings, this stuff isn't even relevant anymore.
  13. That study only includes 25 participants, none of whom are American or Canadian born. They are all immigrant IMGs whose regions of origin are Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. These physicians likely experienced contributory issues that had little to do with the fact that they were internationally trained.
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