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Butterfly_

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  1. Sad
    Butterfly_ reacted to nlaps in Most recent or best Mcat?   
    Does McMaster look at your most recent Cars score or your best one? I wrote once in Jul y then again in September and unfortunately dropped from a 128 to a 123 because of a headache and am freaking out. Really wish I voided it.
  2. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from Ali-oop in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc.
    Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors.

    furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building.
    So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  3. Thanks
    Butterfly_ reacted to Ali-oop in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    30 year grad/ practitioner, former uni instructor and ad com member here, borrowing a member's account to comment. Let me say that from every aforementioned perspective of mine, passion in applicants and practitioners is key- our patients deserve no less. 
    As a practitioner, the difference between those of us who love what we do and those who do not, rests primarily with whether or not we quite literally 'love' what we do. Loving what you do requires passion- yes it does. For those entering this career with the attitude that 'it's a job' but that they will nonetheless be truly dedicated to it to the extent required to be an excellent practitioner in our Canadian system, you are doing your prospective patients and the profession a disservice. I see far too many that are in this for all the wrong reasons- money, prestige- who are burned out and resentful, and complacent in their practice. Are those characteristics you as a patient wish in your physician?  Our system requires extraordinary dedication and long, irregular hours given we could use many more of almost every specialty to meet Canada's needs, and I've yet to see the confluence of a satisfied, dedicated and excellent practitioner and one who chose medicine because 'it's a job'. If you lack passion, you will in all likelihood succumb to burnout, dissatisfaction and that will reflect in your practice. 
    As an instructor/ ad com member, I can say that we are inundated with ample academically qualified applicants, and we ought to begin screening for demonstrated dedication and passion to healthcare from amongst them. Over my career, I have seen an evolution in the attitudes of  medical students which has brought us to exactly where we are now- too many in this for all the wrong reasons. I see far too many students who look at medicine as what it can do for / "owes" them,  ( money, prestige, 'regular' hours....) rather than what they can do for it.  I have taught students who say they "like medicine", but "not the not patients"- preposterous, yes, and entirely too common now. The profession and those we serve ( who, I might add, also pay us) deserve much more. 
    So please, to those of you with whom this is resonating, leave the competition for those who would are both academically qualified and passionate. Given the numbers of applicants to medicine, there is no reason whatsoever our system can't have both. I have two children, both of whom thought they would like to become physicians. My son, quite honestly, for all the wrong reasons- and I steered him away. He is now happily studying finance where he can dedicate himself to making all the money in the world. On the other hand, when my daughter, who is a compassionate and caring soul, expressed her interest in medicine, I encouraged her to do her undergrad in a health profession, for exposure to healthcare both as practice and as a system. She has proven to herself now as an RN  to those with whom she works, and to those she serves, and she is ready to begin medical studies for all the right reasons.
  4. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from conditional knockout in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    Agree. I grew up thinking I wanted to be a baker and that didn’t work out. So I went into investment banking, made lots of money, and didn’t like that either. For a lot of people, it’s takes a lot of personal growth and self awareness to find what they really want to do in life. 
  5. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from Pakoon in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    I see you’re quite upset. I apologize if I was being offensive.
    You’re taking what I said to some extremes that I’ve never meant. Some of the points you said I also agree you.
    Firstly, I’m sure there are more than enough passionate people out there who are also intelligent, empathetic, and capable enough to do the job. I feel sorry for them because I think these people truly deserve a spot.
    I never said I that one’s life should revolve around medicine. Coasting me to means slacking off and not being interested—you have no idea how frustrating it is to work with someone that doesn’t give a shit. Also brings the morale of the team down.
    I agree that work life balance is crucial and no one is asking anyone to be a matyr. Personally, I always put my family first. Not sure why you thought I would think otherwise?
    I am in medicine and the sad reality is there is a lot of people here without passion. Hence why I said what I said. There's also a lot of bad seeds. The system does a very poor job of weeding anything out. Honestly, getting into medicine is more about luck than merit. I just feel very lucky and fortunate to be here. 
    I find that passionate doctors care more about their patients and are overall happier people.
    I’ve had many “jobs” in my life time and they really sucked.  Doing something without passion was so depressing for me. It took me 6 years to find out what I really wanted to do and it’s medicine. 

    Lastly, I disagree about medicine being “just a job”. Medicine, like any job, will pervade your life in many different ways.

    Is medicine your first career? If it is, I hope it’s the right “job”  for you. If not, that’s okay too. I hope you’ll find something that you love to do one day. Good luck.
     
     
  6. Like
    Butterfly_ reacted to Pakoon in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    I think it's a little more simple than that. If you hate what you do. It'll be more difficult to do than if you enjoyed the same task. Getting up in the morning is hard enough if you don't wanna go somewhere, I think the same applies here 
     
    If you're gonna do something for the rest of your life, why not enjoy it. If you don't that's fine too, plenty of people don't. If you do enjoy, that's awesome.
  7. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from LostLamb in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc.
    Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors.

    furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building.
    So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  8. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from Psych in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc.
    Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors.

    furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building.
    So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  9. Like
    Butterfly_ reacted to hopeful_med in Making decisions about specialty..   
    The best specialty is the specialty that you enjoy imo. You can have a rewarding career as a GP, a surgeon, an anesthesiologist, a pathologist etc. I am only a PGY-3 so my view may be a bit naive, but at the end of my 20th hour of my call shift, I want to have a good reason/justification of why I am doing this while I could be at home enjoying life and sleep like most (normal) people. And you know what? Every time I reflect on my journey and my choices, I can’t see myself anywhere else but where I am today, and in my current specialty. I still get excited about going to work when I am on service (despite sometimes brutal hours) and get miserable when I have to go to work on off service rotation where the hours are much more chill and it’s because I love the work I do. So ultimately, don’t worry about the compensation, the job prospect etc. All residency is brutal, doctors will be well compensated, and you will eventually be employed. The career you choose is going to last 30+ years, so find what you enjoy. 
     
    I work with surgeons and other specialists very closely, and I am sure they are well compensated, have a prestigious reputation etc. But looking at their residency and life, I would never pursue that career... ever. I also know they fee the same way about my specialty. So honestly, pursue what you love.
  10. Confused
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from Pakoon in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc.
    Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors.

    furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building.
    So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  11. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from ubcmedxx in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc.
    Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors.

    furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building.
    So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  12. Confused
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from whatdoido in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc.
    Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors.

    furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building.
    So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  13. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from blah1234 in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc.
    Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors.

    furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building.
    So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  14. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from MedZZZ in Need Advice Re Electives   
    Given the COVID situation and the impact on capacity, I think the # of electives you do in a specialty definitely won't matter as much this year. Many students in my class had this concern and it has been brought up to admins/afmc/cfms. At the moment, students in my class can't do electives of their choice because there is simply no space. People get spots based on luck. (aka IM gunners can't do IM electives and are forced to do unrelated electives).  So i'd say don't worry about it at all. If you explain yourself properly in your interview, you'll be fine. 
  15. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from DMD18 in How will the compensation for Canadian physicians look like in the future?   
    No matter what happens, If you’re going to be a doctor, you’re going to live a comfortable life. If you want to be rich, do something else.
  16. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from Anoumdphd in How will the compensation for Canadian physicians look like in the future?   
    No matter what happens, If you’re going to be a doctor, you’re going to live a comfortable life. If you want to be rich, do something else.
  17. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from Elgar in Bad Grade   
    Sounds like the instructor gave you explanations but instead of taking them to heart, you still think you did fine and that she was the one who wasn’t right.
    Attitude like that won’t get you very far in life. 
    Giving you extra work is giving you an extra chance. It’s not because she feels that she was unreasonable. In fact, if it were me, you wouldn’t get any extra chances to make up anything.
    Back when I went to school, we NEVER argued grades with the prof. You get what you get. Anything more is basically entitlement. 
    Just accept that you screwed up and do better next time. Next time, meaning, your next life situation.
    this sentence “ there’s nothing to take away from this experience” is bs.
    Just because you finished school doesn’t mean you can’t  take away learnings from this experience to apply to other aspects of your life and future. 
     
  18. Like
    Butterfly_ reacted to offmychestplease in Bad Grade   
    -
  19. Like
    Butterfly_ reacted to takasugi in Bad Grade   
    You should learn to take responsibility. All I hear in this thread is that it was the instructors fault that you got a bad mark.
    I find it very unlikely that your instructor would give you a bad mark for no reason....
    You probably underestimated the course, thought it would be easy, and got a reality check.
  20. Like
    Butterfly_ reacted to Arztin in Career advice: Medicine vs. Tech (data science)   
    Yes, there are people who did it just because they had the grades and weren't really passionate about it.
    Among those people, some people who left at some point during their training. I saw some really unhappy people, both trainees and attendings. There was a story of an attending who hated his job, but kept doing it because of the money. 
    Sure there are perks, but don't ignore the drawbacks.
    Keep in mind that the training is pretty intense. You need to drink from a fire hose during preclerkship, and the hours aren't always great during clinical training afterwards.
    It's also a huge time investment. Many people do 5 yrs of residency + 2 years of training as a fellow afterwards. IMO, it's pretty long. All that to potentially not be able to work where you want.
    I've seen multiple people break up with their partner during training.
    I think I've seen all my close friends at some point burn out during their training.
    Then there are the odd things that you wouldn't do or see in most other fields unless if you are a cop or a firefighter. For example, last week I had to tell a patient and her son that she was going to die within a few hours and there wasn't anything we could do to cure her disease. She wasn't ready to die. Unfortuately, she indeed died 2 hours later. Those aren't easy discussions. At this point, I totally lost count of the number of patients I've seen die. Then there are things that you hear or see that are quite traumatizing, for example, children getting abused etc...
    I'm personally happy about my choice. I've worked really hard the last few years, and I'm lucky to have a position where I want, with the type of practice that I wanted. Fortunately I'm still passionate about medicine and I love what I do.
    All that to say: you better be passionate about medicine if you want to pursue this field. If not, do something else.
     
  21. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from Swon in Is family medicine really that bad?   
    I think with proper communication litigation can be avoided.
     At the end of the day, it’s up to the patient to decide whether or not they want to to the ER. You shouldn’t tell them to go, you should provide them with the pros and cons and explain to them your rationale.
     
    if you said, “ I know you feel fine, And the risk of you actually having a PE is low, I still think it’s a good idea to run some tests at the ER just to be sure because of xyz reasons.”
    Same in the case of a sick kid. If you give proper instructions for returning to clinic or going to ER, you shouldn’t be sued. “Currently, your child’s vitals signs are stable, and the symptoms are likely caused by a viral urti, however, if your child’s condition worsens, aka Less wet diapers, becoming lethargic, not drinking etc, make sure you go to ER right away.
    if you document and communicate  properly, you probably won’t be sued.
  22. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from brattatat in International medical schools   
    I'm sorry to hear about your parents. I'm not sure if going the international route would make it faster for you to become a doctor. Matching into residency as an international student is not easy. Since your parents are sick, I'd assume you want to be near them and take care of them? Do your parents live in Canada? If so, going international and trying to match back to Canada may take even longer. You'd also likely not match back to Canada--you'd have higher chances matching the US. Therefore, you might not be able to live close to your parents in the future.  Furthermore, the reason why the matching process is so important is because your medical degree would be useless without a residency position. You cannot become an independent practicing doctor without it. 
    Your GPA from high school wont matter. It's your university grades that you need to use to apply to medical school. Also, I wouldn't be so quick to say that you won't get a good MCAT score. I think you should try taking the exam first. 
    Furthermore, going international would place a huge financial burden on you and your family. Have you thought about how you would finance your international education? Living expenses, moving costs, tuition--It's hundreds of thousands of dollars -->all of this is many times more expensive than Canada. 
  23. Like
    Butterfly_ reacted to Weltschmerz in International medical schools   
    I meant that in the eyes of residency programs it will matter.
  24. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from dooogs in Observerships in first year ?   
    We call them horizontals at Mac and all of them have been cancelled because of Covid. Admin is struggling to even place just my class (2021) in clerkship, so I doubt you'll be allowed to do them any time soon. When they do permit them again, the seconds years will have priority over first years.  Currently, the second years have had all their electives and horizontals cancelled because of capacity. They don't get to start until January 2021. Sorry to be a messenger of bad news, but on the bright side, you won't be missing out much. I barely did any horizontals myself and many of classmates haven't either. You can try to discover what kind of career you like by messaging upper years, residents and preceptors. You'll also get chance to explore during actual clerkship as well. 
  25. Like
    Butterfly_ got a reaction from James Nystead in How to know if you are a good or bad clerk?   
    I think it really comes down to your attitude,  willingness to learn, and being respectful to all those around you. When it comes to medical knowledge, I always feel like I know nothing when I start a rotation. However, If you’re positive, interested, and respectful, you’ll do well in whatever rotation you’re in. Nurses and patients will praise you in front your preceptors and your preceptor will likely give you good feedback on evals/ offer to write you reference letters.
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