Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

dh.

Members
  • Content Count

    44
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    dh. reacted to squeekz07 in Verifiers contacted   
    3rd time applicant here. I would really like to urge everybody to put zero emphasis on whether or not your verifiers are being contacted. I’ve been waitlisted twice, but have had friends be both accepted and rejected, and verifiers have been contacted in each instance. All this really tells us is that they are moving along with the process. Try and stay relaxed everyone, we’ve got another 3 months or so to go! 
  2. Like
    dh. got a reaction from greysweater in MCAT Score Still Not Verified   
    I’m a current med1 at Dal, and my MCAT scores never displayed as “verified,” so try not to worry about it. Start prepping for interviews instead! Best of luck!
  3. Like
    dh. reacted to ER_Mike in Which medical specialties have the least diversity??   
    Improving diversity in medicine generally is how you improve diversity in some areas specifically, I'll assert. One way you improve diversity in medicine is by removing barriers that disproportionately stand in the way of minority applicants. For example, we might want to do something about racist school boards that automatically shunts many non-white kids into college/trades streams (https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2020/03/22/peel-school-board-report-leaves-readers-devastated-now-its-up-to-the-education-minister-to-fix.html). Or police services that unjustly target and brutalize minority communities (https://globalnews.ca/news/7048298/policing-in-canada-colonialism-anti-black-racism/). Or a society overall which for centuries has discriminated against and attempted to marginalize non-white people (https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/five-charts-that-show-what-systemic-racism-looks-like-in-canada-1.4970352). And how about the legacy of colonialism and the generational trauma of residential schools (http://www.trc.ca/about-us/trc-findings.html)?
    If we want to increase diversity in medicine, we need to address the racism in our country that still, to this day, right now, works to keep minorities in the margins. Otherise, ensuring the incoming cohorts have some diversity can help, as a more diverse medical profession will itself engender a more diverse profession.
    In the meantime, addressing poverty through a more robust social safety net or universal basic income. And we have more unoccupied homes than homeless people. Both of those issues -- poverty and homelessness -- similarly affect minorities at a greater rate (https://www.homelesshub.ca/blog/what-are-stats-racialized-homelessness). Both are issues within our power to solve and which will help more people in these communities reach their potential, which can include medical school. To say nothing about the humanitarian rightness of it/social determinants of health angle.
  4. Like
    dh. reacted to Haku_ in I grew up poor, do they really want to know how much of a sobstory it was   
    I'm first gen, didn't have to resolve customs issues but I do represent my family to resolve different issues. What you have done I think, shows responsibility, cross-cultural communication skills, and the ability to understand regulations. I'm not familiar with Dal or their criteria but for most Canadian med schools, what they look for are certain attributes as opposed to knowing what pt care/being a doctor is like.  When it comes to challenges w/in your community, you can also discuss how there are others who face similar challenges as you and use your own experience of overcoming challenges as an example b/c you are part of the immigrant community in your area.  
  5. Like
    dh. got a reaction from Kawhi2Raptors in I grew up poor, do they really want to know how much of a sobstory it was   
    Part of my essay was about my experience growing up in poverty and domestic violence, and how this experience has shaped who I am today. It was not a sob story; I need no pity nor sympathy. I wrote about this to explain why I took so long to get to medicine (older med student), how it motivates me to improve patient care and better support the communities I wish to serve as a doctor, and why being a doctor is the best way for me to do so.
    It was very hard to write about, and it was extremely personal, at times embarrassing. But it is part of what drives me every day, so I had to include it.
    Please have other people read and edit your essay! It will be good for you and your essay.
  6. Like
    dh. got a reaction from avocado_toast in I grew up poor, do they really want to know how much of a sobstory it was   
    Part of my essay was about my experience growing up in poverty and domestic violence, and how this experience has shaped who I am today. It was not a sob story; I need no pity nor sympathy. I wrote about this to explain why I took so long to get to medicine (older med student), how it motivates me to improve patient care and better support the communities I wish to serve as a doctor, and why being a doctor is the best way for me to do so.
    It was very hard to write about, and it was extremely personal, at times embarrassing. But it is part of what drives me every day, so I had to include it.
    Please have other people read and edit your essay! It will be good for you and your essay.
  7. Haha
    dh. reacted to j17f in Stereotypical Hobbies & Interests Per Specialty   
    This post is definitley weird. 
  8. Like
    dh. got a reaction from TheBanana_stand in I grew up poor, do they really want to know how much of a sobstory it was   
    Part of my essay was about my experience growing up in poverty and domestic violence, and how this experience has shaped who I am today. It was not a sob story; I need no pity nor sympathy. I wrote about this to explain why I took so long to get to medicine (older med student), how it motivates me to improve patient care and better support the communities I wish to serve as a doctor, and why being a doctor is the best way for me to do so.
    It was very hard to write about, and it was extremely personal, at times embarrassing. But it is part of what drives me every day, so I had to include it.
    Please have other people read and edit your essay! It will be good for you and your essay.
  9. Like
    dh. reacted to DrDre in Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Essays?   
    3rd time was the charm for me! Year 1: reject, Year 2: waitlist, Year 3: accepted. To be honest, I think what made a difference for me was the interview. But re: essay my second application had slight tweaks after some feedback from peers, and then the third year it had more of an overhaul after more feedback and some advice from friends in med. Change involved elaborating more on some select experiences, and removing mention of others. So it became less of a list of experiences (which adcom can get from your supplemental ECs) and showed greater depth in my thoughts, emotions, reflection on certain experiences. In some cases I also dialed down the formality and let my personality show through a bit more. It's possible none of this really applies to your writing, so not sure if it's helpful!  Of note, my supplemental score increased 3 points btw 1st and 2nd try and my ECs didn't really change. So editing the essay can be a good thing. My advice would be to let some trusted ppl read over your essay to get feedback, and if you can find examples of essays from successful applicants that could also be helpful.  Feel free to pm me to chat more about it!
  10. Like
    dh. reacted to frenchpress in Really REALLY need some sound advice.   
    1. No, you’re not too old.
    2. You only have about one semesters worth of courses. In the context of a full university degree, this isn’t a lot. I don’t know the ins and outs of every Ontario school’s application process, and it may be an issue at some schools, but on the whole, no I don’t believe it will completely screw you over. 
    3. Focus on something that you’re interested in, that you’re motivated to do well in, and that will be a reasonable career path for you even if you don’t get into med.
  11. Like
    dh. reacted to DrDre in Worth it to apply? (IP)   
    Definitely go for it. I had a 3.7 gpa and a 505 MCAT and got in this past cycle. It was my third try though, and I think the interview held me back. If your Casper is all good, you will likely get an interview as IP. If interviews are something you are uncomfortable with, start prepping now. Practice, practice, practice in-person with whomever will listen, virtually with other applicants, record yourself on camera. The more you do this the less phased you'll be on the actual day! Cannot stress enough how key interview practice is!! It's a good chunk of your score, and the only thing you have control of once your app is submitted. Good luck!!
  12. Like
    dh. reacted to MDinCanada in Using Youtube for medical education..   
    lmao, since we do "problem based learning" and don't have any lectures (we're expected to read chapters from textbooks like Harrison's), 90% of my medical education comes from videos, especially for the foundational sciences. 
  13. Like
    dh. got a reaction from TackleMD in MCAT score and Transcript received?   
    Mine never updated! I just kinda had to trust the system, but it worked!
  14. Like
    dh. got a reaction from DrOtter in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    The interest rate is annual, calculated daily, and compounded monthly; if your balance remained the same for the duration of a 30 day month, your interest calculation can be simplified like this:
    balance * rate/365 * days_in_month
    So if your opening balance at the start of the month is $100, and remains the same, you’ll end the month with a new balance of $100.33.
    $100 + 100*0.04/365*30 = $100.33
  15. Like
    dh. reacted to MedLife2018 in What should I take for my undergrad degree   
    In my experience there is no such thing as an "easy degree". Every program is difficult in its own way and how difficult you find it depends on how much you enjoy the material and your own strengths. I would suggest that instead of approaching this as what program you think med admissions would like best, you consider what you are most interested in. You will likely do better and work harder if it is something you genuinely want to learn. Admission policy and committees change and will likely be different 4 years out when you complete your undergrad. So instead of trying to game the system, find something you want to learn and you might want to pursue as a career as med acceptances are no guarantee. Good luck.
  16. Like
    dh. reacted to INTJ-A in Could I please get some advice on how to study in medical school? Or additional resources to use?   
    Not sure why no one has answered this so I'll give it a go (though I am by no means an expert as I'm also going into first year at U of A).
    So based on a recent discussion on our class' FB group, most upper-year students are suggesting not to purchase any textbooks aside from the cardiology one (called Pathophysiology of Heart Disease by Leonard Lilly), and that one should be available online for free through the U of A library portal. 
    Someone suggested getting the Toronto Notes once our class representative sells them.
    I also read that we will have access to notes from upper years for our blocks once they begin.
    I'm pretty sure that there are way more resources out there than we actually need and I will definitely wait until lectures start to really see if I need anything beyond aforementioned. I heard good things about Lecturio and Osmosis, but won't be using them right away (if at all) either. Will be using anki for sure though.
    I understand that mechanical engineering isn't exactly a traditional premed program but then there isn't a designated premed program anyway, so I don't think that puts you at a disadvantage. Have faith in the admissions committee, if they felt that you're a good fit for the program, that implies their belief in your academic capacity. I specifically recall how during our virtual get-together with the 2023s, one student said that he is actually a lot more at ease in med school as compared to undergrad in spite of the overwhelming curriculum because he no longer feels the need to be the best in class. It's a Pass/Fail system after all and as far as I can tell there's quite a bit of collegiality amongst students.
    Lastly, I'll mention two videos that speak about studying in med school. The first one is by a current fourth-year med student at U of A. In it he talks about the specific study techniques he uses. The second one is a more general advice on how to succeed in first year.
    Cheers
  17. Like
    dh. got a reaction from tommy_till in Is this an achievement?   
    Sounds like one to me! Go for it.
  18. Like
    dh. reacted to petitmonstre111 in Leaving career for med   
    Thanks for your input. After getting in touch with med students outside of this forum, I opted against working part time.
    I do like my current job but it most certainly does not qualify as leisure!
  19. Like
    dh. reacted to CARsandCoffee in Hairstyles for medical school for males   
    Rock a mullet: Business in the front/ party in the back
  20. Like
    dh. reacted to nervousboi in Could I please get some advice on how to study in medical school? Or additional resources to use?   
    I was hoping I could get some advice for how to approach medical school, especially since classes are completely online for the first semester so it wont be as easy to ask other student what they're doing.
    I'm starting classes at the UofA this August. I did a degree in mechanical engineering and I haven't taken anything related to biology since the middle of high school. In my undergrad I mostly took exams which required me to solve 2-5 problems over the course of a couple hours, about 80% of the time these exams would be open book. The only content heavy closed book exam I had to take was the MCAT, which I don't think I did a great job studying for (ended up with a 502); all I really did was watch khan academy lectures (while writing down notes) and do practice problems. My concern is I don't know how to study content heavy coursework, something most students are familiar with by now.
    Does anyone have any advice on how to study/what the workflow of a typical first year student is like?
    Furthermore are there any supplemental materials I should consider using? I've seen some people on this forum talk about using american resources in their first two years (even if their not interested in writing the step 1 exam) such as reading first aid prior to each new block, watching boards and beyond videos in tandem with their lectures, and using pre made step 1 anki decks. Does that make sense, or would it be better to spend more time studying my schools lectures since they will likely be the most similar to the exams we write? Really I'd appreciate any advice  
  21. Like
    dh. reacted to Butterfly_ in #MedBikini   
    This research is BS. I don’t think there’s ANYTHING wrong with doctors drinking alcohol or wearing bikinis when they are not working. Doctors are human too and it’s called having a LIFE. 
  22. Like
    dh. reacted to rmorelan in #MedBikini   
    good grief - of all the things a research team could study in all the world to improve the treatment and care of patients this is the topic they decide to cover? Then they actually trolled hundreds of doctors to look at their social media accounts and graded them on various behaviours....... The morality police are out in full force - this crap shouldn't have even be published. 
    also from a purely experimental design point of view isn't this study horrible? I mean only 1/2 of the vascular residents were actually found - so what you really saying is of the residents that even care to be open on socially media this is what they are doing. Good reason to think that group is different than the group they couldn't find so you cannot really extend the findings. Plus they don't even make any conclusion - they restate the findings, and say beware that things are  online. Ok we knew that prior to the paper even saying anything - so what was the actual science done? 
    " It has been demonstrated that publicly available social media content may affect patient choice of physician, hospital, and medical facility" 
    in what way? How - positive or negative? How does that impact patient outcome (and yes that is the primary thing I care about)? A lot of vague statements there - may impact, could play a role in future hiring blah blah. 
  23. Like
    dh. reacted to gogogo in -   
    Congratulations on making the career switch. I did it too and medicine is better than my previous career. I am also "older" than the average med student, though not that much (27). 
    I do not agree with you about how med school and residency won't force you to put life on hold, however. By "on hold," I don't mean life has to stop. You can for sure get married, have a kid, buy a house, etc. if your circumstances allow. So instead, by "on hold," I mean not have as much time for those things as you would want. I am speaking as a med student in a long-term stable relationship and who has older parents in my class. Med school is all-consuming, especially clerkship. Residency is probably the same. Of course you can "make it work" during this time. But I don't think it's ideal. I am putting off kids for after residency because I can't imagine how I'll be a parent while I'm studying all the time. My partner is extremely supportive and understands why I barely have time to spend with her. Even when we do spend time, I am studying 90% of the time. The fathers and mothers in my program are going through the same thing. They don't have much time for their family and it's the partner who is shouldering most of the domestic duties. So of course, you can get through med school and residency while being a parent, but it's a very, very tough ride. Many of the younger students in my class also broke up with their partners pretty soon after med school started.
    Your experience may be different and I hope you find a way to make it work!
  24. Like
    dh. reacted to tallshirts in -   
    The main concern I am going to respond to, that others have raised, is age. It really doesn't matter what age you are when you start school, except that as you get older you can't stay up as late and you need to plan your time better because you can't burn the candle at both ends. I think that whole "do you really want to put your life on hold until you're 40" argument is a bit ludicrous. I am in the process of switching careers from one profession to medicine (I start med school in a few weeks). I'm 34, and if all goes to plan I will be a physician by the time I'm 40. What is the average age of retirement for family doctors? 60? 65? Some work until they're much older than that. Personally, I would much rather have a shorter career that I like than a long one that I feel trapped by.
    I also don't see the need to put things on hold. I am in a stable relationship and will be having a kid in November. Too many people see being in a relationship/married as some sort of conflict with their career, when in fact it can be useful to stave off burnout. Having a supportive partner and a little guy to come home to sounds like a pretty big value added, rather than any sort of sacrifice. You know what else I've learned in my "old age"? Boundaries. I know that in order to maintain my health, there are things I need to do - eat, sleep, stay active. A lot of students who have only been students get lulled into this fantasy that student life requires all-nighters and constant studying, when that's simply not true.
    Everyone's experience is different. If you feel compelled to go to med school, then by all means try your darnedest to do so.
  25. Like
    dh. reacted to piperacillin in Anki cards?   
    As someone who did Anki in pre-clinical, I'm not sure I would suggest anyone do Anking versus making their own cards instead. Anking was meant to be a comprehensive resource to perform well on Step 1. It also goes far deeper into certain subjects and much less deep in other areas than your school will. Step 1 is moving to pass/fail so there isn't a benefit of doing such a large deck even if you plan to write step 1 - there are significant drawbacks in the amount of time it takes.
    Definitely test it out, but it sounds like even American students are shifting away from large decks like anking. Making cards is time consuming but is honestly just like regular studying
×
×
  • Create New...