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MazzyStar

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  1. Like
    MazzyStar reacted to rednwhite in MOTP   
    Currently a military anesthesia resident after completing MOTP/MMTP and four years of service as a family physician.
    To answer your question, MOTP/MMTP cannot complete a +1 before practice. As above, FM must be completed as MOTP/MMTP. After three years of service as a GDMO, there is opportunity for re-training (if selected) but available positions will vary depending on CAF requirements and funding. The CAF military specialist group is a relatively small number so it is difficult to forecast what positions will be open year-to-year as it would depend on retirements/releases and operational requirements.
  2. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from Johnboy in MOTP   
    Hey Johnboy, incoming MS1 here.
    I'm also looking into MOTP. I need to get more concrete details from the recruiting folks, but based on my conversations with a few past, and current MOTP/MMTP students, it varies depending on the needs of the military at that time. There's a few residencies highlighted on the recruiting website that are more in demand, and could be covered; emergency medicine, orthopedics, anasthesiology, psychiatry, PHPM.. I believe they also fund +1s in Emerg'.
    I think the general process is, you finish FM and work as a GD-MO (General Duties Medical Officer - Aka Family Doc) for a few years (3-5?) after which you could potentially apply for that second residency. Financially, it would mean getting paid an MO salary while undergoing a 5(+) yr residency, with a 5 year return of service (ROS) afterwards.
    Feel free to PM or be in touch if you want to chat further.
  3. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from jero123 in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Result: Waitlisted (Accepted off the Waitlist - 26 May)
    Timestamp: 9:32am
    2YRS: 3.79
    MCAT: 510 (126/129/128/127)
    ECs: Fairly strong - quite active in the latter half of my undergrad. Clubs, societies, leadership positions. Research volunteering, research employment, wet lab stuff, clinical stuff. Working with vulnerable populations, education & outreach/advocacy. Few poster presentations and awards, one manuscript pending. Longstanding nontraditional employment + leadership. It's been a long road.
    Interview: Was a little nervous walking into it, but felt good, and confident. Was (internally) taken back by a few of the MMI prompts, but always felt I had something to offer. Panel was rough and interrogatory, but I was able to address their questions well. Definitely walked out of the panel a little shaken, but.. I didn't take it personally (nor should you, should this happen to be you in the future).
    In-person or Virtual: In-person
    Year: Undergrad complete (2016)
    Geography: IP
    Really hoping for Queens this year.. so fingers crossed!

    Edit: Accepted off the waitlist 26 May, will be accepting. Thrilled to be joining QMED2024
  4. Thanks
    MazzyStar reacted to medisforme in Is family medicine really that bad?   
    I am 1.5 years out of residency and don't understand all the doom and gloom around family medicine. As a disclaimer, I neither love nor hate family medicine.  It provides a great income so I can provide for my family and enjoy the time I spend with them.  The other disclaimer, is that I quickly gave up on trying to be an agent for change in our health care system, it is too inefficient and bureaucratic and not amenable to change.  I am much happier just putting my head down and working within the parameters we have.
    1) My personal opinion is that the NP/PA encroachment is almost irrelevant (at least in BC).  There is such a dire lack of primary care that there will always be work for family doctors (outside of large cities at least).  The city I work in, has at least 3 new NP's to help ease the fact that there is a 5 year wait to obtain a family doctor (i do have a problem with how much NP's earn per patient seen, which is a bit of a separate argument).  
    2) I also don't understand the paperwork argument
    - don't refill Rx by fax
    - charge patients for all private forms
    - you bill for all simple communications with nursing homes, home health etc...
    It's a non-issue if you follow the above 3 rules
    3) Memorize your province's billing codes to help you maximize your income (I already outearn most of my colleagues who have no idea about all the billing codes available to them.)  I earned >350K last year, with zero hospital work, zero evening work, and a minutiae of weekend work.  I typically see about 30 patients on a full office day.
    ie. psychosocial issues can easily be converted to counselling and mental health planning appointments, filter charts to see who qualifies for chronic disease management codes (ie. anyone who has ever had an Ha1c of 6.5 or above qualifies for CC diabetes codes regardless of their complexity) etc...
     
    Negatives would be:
    that certainly, there is a lot of frustration with certain patients who are demanding, neurotic etc... It doesn't provide a lot of job satisfaction.  
    A lot of the office based work involves listening and counselling on mental health issues (the medicine is just validating their feelings and providing simple advice, which is actually often quite helpful).  That is not for everyone
    Dealing with chronic pain (especially chronic back pain).  Very difficult to convince patients there is little indication for medications, procedures etc... vs physio, tai chi, weight loss, stretches (as an aside see February 18 issue of the economist for a crazy story on how much is spent treating back pain in the US, it is nearly 80% of what is spend on all cancer treatments).  This also doesn't lead to much job satisfaction.
     
    I would just say speak to a variety of family docs about their experiences before making a decision as you will find a wide variety of opinions.
  5. Like
    MazzyStar reacted to teeezyyy in CMA c2024 backpack colour choices (w/ pics)   
    OMG I LOVE THE BURGUNDY! Fingers crossed for that (or purple)! Its so chic and won't look as dirty as the blue one. I strongly dislike the yellow and orange lol my eyes hurt looking at them
  6. Thanks
    MazzyStar reacted to frenchpress in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    The banks often take a month or two to get their offers up to date, and it might be slower than usual because of COVID. I wouldn’t rush into it unless you’re really needing the cash. Usually June/July is when it’s clear what the offers are for the incoming class.
  7. Like
    MazzyStar reacted to frenchpress in Affording Med School   
    Think about all of your money and debts in one big pot - what’s going to save you the most overall?
    The point of rainy day savings is to allow for cash flow when you have an unexpected or big purchase, to avoid having to borrow money expensively (e.g. pay day loan or credit card debt). But what is the point in ‘rainy days savings’ when you are actively using your LOC in parallel? You have the low-interest LOC to provide cash flow in an emergency.

    I think only makes sense to keep money in savings on the side if your savings interest rate is more than the loan interest rate... if that’s not happening, then you’re actually costing yourself more money every month, because you’re accruing interest on debt you don’t need to carry. I think it usually makes the most sense to use your savings first, and only then borrow from your LOC, otherwise you’re paying more in interest than you have to. (I'm assuming we're talking regular savings here and not, for example, an RRSP which has potentially expensive tax implications and may need to be draw down more wisely).  . . . can any of the more financially informed on here can think of a situation I’m missing where this doesn’t make sense?
    So to answer your interest payments question: I let the interest payments get added to the loan. When I have income here and there (for example when my student loan comes in, bursaries, side jobs, etc.) I am paying down the LOC as much as possible. Not just paying down the interest, but the principle. Then when I need money, I take it from the LOC again. I accrue as little interest as possible every month by keeping the principle as low as I can. For example, say I get a $8,000 student loan, but my tuition isn’t due for another 2 months. I pay down my LOC while I have the cash, and for those 2 months I’ve reduced the total loan I have to pay interest on by $8000. I’m still taking money out of the LOC for rent, etc. every month. But it’s still a relative savings. 
  8. Like
    MazzyStar reacted to frenchpress in Have accepted applicants heard anything from UBC?   
    I remember this part taking forever - the administrative stuff will take time, and some of it comes out via many emails over June and July and August! Possibly longer this year, because of COVID and adjustments. They’re also desperately trying to get things ready for 4th year clerks to go back in July, and there’s overlap in some staff who help with more than one year of the program. 
    Once you’re enrolled in classes you’ll be able to print out a proof of enrolment letter - that’s the ‘confirmation letter’ many banks want for the LOC. That usually happens in July, same time as when many of the banks will have updated their LOC offers.
  9. Thanks
    MazzyStar got a reaction from SquirtleMD in Final Transcripts   
    Hey everyone - chiming in here. My friend and I are in the same boat - he emailed admissions, and they mentioned that if you have nothing to update since you last submitted your transcripts (i.e. you graduated prior to applying), there's no need to submit another set of transcripts. 
  10. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from nrcplstake in Queens Waitlist Party 2020   
    Got off the waitlist - 10:16AM today.
    Fingers crossed for my future classmates here!
  11. Like
    MazzyStar reacted to MDLD in Queens Waitlist Party 2020   
    Wanted to post I got off the waitlist at 10:16.
     
    I am on the waitlist for Mac and will be waiting to see if I hear back from them. 

    Keep holding on guys 
  12. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from sykern in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Result: Waitlisted (Accepted off the Waitlist - 26 May)
    Timestamp: 9:32am
    2YRS: 3.79
    MCAT: 510 (126/129/128/127)
    ECs: Fairly strong - quite active in the latter half of my undergrad. Clubs, societies, leadership positions. Research volunteering, research employment, wet lab stuff, clinical stuff. Working with vulnerable populations, education & outreach/advocacy. Few poster presentations and awards, one manuscript pending. Longstanding nontraditional employment + leadership. It's been a long road.
    Interview: Was a little nervous walking into it, but felt good, and confident. Was (internally) taken back by a few of the MMI prompts, but always felt I had something to offer. Panel was rough and interrogatory, but I was able to address their questions well. Definitely walked out of the panel a little shaken, but.. I didn't take it personally (nor should you, should this happen to be you in the future).
    In-person or Virtual: In-person
    Year: Undergrad complete (2016)
    Geography: IP
    Really hoping for Queens this year.. so fingers crossed!

    Edit: Accepted off the waitlist 26 May, will be accepting. Thrilled to be joining QMED2024
  13. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from Medddddd in     .   
    Overall, I really enjoyed the experience - shout out to the UBC Med students and staff who helped create an organized and welcoming environment. It was fun getting a chance to chat and meet some of the diverse interviewees. Also, anecdotally, speaking to a few people that have interviewed elsewhere, they said that UBC was one of the more pleasant MMI circuits they've done. (Also, how gorgeous is that life sciences center? Yeesh!)

    I spent some time meditating/exercising that morning, and walked into it feeling oddly calm, which was nice (I'm hoping I was able to relay at least a little of that to the other folks I chatted with before we started). As far as how the MMI went; it was pretty much as expected. I'm the type of person that enjoys chatting and engaging with new people, so if anything, the MMI felt like an exercise in that. I found it helpful to walk into each new station with an attitude of, "Cool, that was fun, let's do this" - It takes the pressure off, if you take it a little less seriously, IMO.

    By the end, I think we were all exhausted - but it's my understanding that it's to be expected, so I'm not too concerned about that dragging down my performance.

    Overall, felt good about it! I'm on the lower end of the MCAT and GPA stream, so we'll see what happens, but I wish everyone luck, regardless
  14. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from vms in     .   
    Overall, I really enjoyed the experience - shout out to the UBC Med students and staff who helped create an organized and welcoming environment. It was fun getting a chance to chat and meet some of the diverse interviewees. Also, anecdotally, speaking to a few people that have interviewed elsewhere, they said that UBC was one of the more pleasant MMI circuits they've done. (Also, how gorgeous is that life sciences center? Yeesh!)

    I spent some time meditating/exercising that morning, and walked into it feeling oddly calm, which was nice (I'm hoping I was able to relay at least a little of that to the other folks I chatted with before we started). As far as how the MMI went; it was pretty much as expected. I'm the type of person that enjoys chatting and engaging with new people, so if anything, the MMI felt like an exercise in that. I found it helpful to walk into each new station with an attitude of, "Cool, that was fun, let's do this" - It takes the pressure off, if you take it a little less seriously, IMO.

    By the end, I think we were all exhausted - but it's my understanding that it's to be expected, so I'm not too concerned about that dragging down my performance.

    Overall, felt good about it! I'm on the lower end of the MCAT and GPA stream, so we'll see what happens, but I wish everyone luck, regardless
  15. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from Matty66 in     .   
    Overall, I really enjoyed the experience - shout out to the UBC Med students and staff who helped create an organized and welcoming environment. It was fun getting a chance to chat and meet some of the diverse interviewees. Also, anecdotally, speaking to a few people that have interviewed elsewhere, they said that UBC was one of the more pleasant MMI circuits they've done. (Also, how gorgeous is that life sciences center? Yeesh!)

    I spent some time meditating/exercising that morning, and walked into it feeling oddly calm, which was nice (I'm hoping I was able to relay at least a little of that to the other folks I chatted with before we started). As far as how the MMI went; it was pretty much as expected. I'm the type of person that enjoys chatting and engaging with new people, so if anything, the MMI felt like an exercise in that. I found it helpful to walk into each new station with an attitude of, "Cool, that was fun, let's do this" - It takes the pressure off, if you take it a little less seriously, IMO.

    By the end, I think we were all exhausted - but it's my understanding that it's to be expected, so I'm not too concerned about that dragging down my performance.

    Overall, felt good about it! I'm on the lower end of the MCAT and GPA stream, so we'll see what happens, but I wish everyone luck, regardless
  16. Like
    MazzyStar got a reaction from coffeeandmed in     .   
    Overall, I really enjoyed the experience - shout out to the UBC Med students and staff who helped create an organized and welcoming environment. It was fun getting a chance to chat and meet some of the diverse interviewees. Also, anecdotally, speaking to a few people that have interviewed elsewhere, they said that UBC was one of the more pleasant MMI circuits they've done. (Also, how gorgeous is that life sciences center? Yeesh!)

    I spent some time meditating/exercising that morning, and walked into it feeling oddly calm, which was nice (I'm hoping I was able to relay at least a little of that to the other folks I chatted with before we started). As far as how the MMI went; it was pretty much as expected. I'm the type of person that enjoys chatting and engaging with new people, so if anything, the MMI felt like an exercise in that. I found it helpful to walk into each new station with an attitude of, "Cool, that was fun, let's do this" - It takes the pressure off, if you take it a little less seriously, IMO.

    By the end, I think we were all exhausted - but it's my understanding that it's to be expected, so I'm not too concerned about that dragging down my performance.

    Overall, felt good about it! I'm on the lower end of the MCAT and GPA stream, so we'll see what happens, but I wish everyone luck, regardless
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