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FrannieLydon

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  1. Thanks
    FrannieLydon reacted to offmychestplease in -   
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    FrannieLydon reacted to rmorelan in -   
    yup, although it is variable and depends on where you are going and what you are doing. 
    Many fellowships are not unionized and so there are no fixed rules. Also confusion is we use the term fellowship for some normal training in some fields (like IM but also as an example neuro radiology - any thing that actually has a college exam after it - those do follow unionized pay increases). For truly post residency training the salaries can be follow the provincial salary rules for PGY6 but I have seen it lower as well in quite a number of fields (it is one year, and supposed to get you a job so people still go for them). May seem unfair but residency is paid by the government while fellowships are usually funded by the actual practice group (it is different when it is your money). Also some set up moonlighting opportunities so a lower salary may mask in reality a better income than it appears. 
    In the US where many people go for some fields the salaries are quite variable as well, as you often have to compensate people for the cost of the city people are in. For instance Harvard based ones were 20K higher than some other places I looked at but Boston is the 3rd or 4th most expensive city in the US. If you didn't bump it up no one would come. 
     
  3. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to rmorelan in Call Lingo Explained?   
    I will add in some fields they can be longer - under PARO they can be up to noon on the post call day I believe as an example . There is a lot of balance with this stuff - outside of surgery at many places (which is its own animal even though it officially falls under the rules ha ), the more tough the call shift is the less likely they are to force you to stick around until the max allocated amount of time. Similarly the official 1 in 4 max call is also rarely actually used and usually at least not for long. you can create in your mind horrible scenarios of max call, max call length, and then add on their special extra call shifts they can add in an emergency...... You can in theory do all that but in reality if you did for any length of time people would start crashing - residency is LONG - you need some kind of sustainable system. 
    also we tend to be merciful on med students. I mean we know you are new to this, not even getting paid, and if something comes up really late it is usually faster for the resident to do it than have them wait until you do it and then go over it. Just general guidelines. 
     
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    FrannieLydon got a reaction from 1D7 in Call Lingo Explained?   
    Thank so much! You have been most helpful  
  5. Thanks
    FrannieLydon reacted to 1D7 in Call Lingo Explained?   
    For in-house call, it will be 24-26 hours (i.e. start of your day, which is around usually 7-8 to the next day around 7-8 plus handover taking 1-2 hours). On some services you will work a few more hours handling busywork, typically until noon, meaning ~28 hours. 
    If you are doing home call like I said you may just continue to work, or you may get a post-call day depending on how much you worked overnight and the culture.
    Rarely there may be some sort of special evening shift for some services which is also referred to as call but does not last nearly as long as a typical 24+ hr shift.
    If you are doing nightfloat usually you get blocks of X hour shifts overnight.
  6. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to 1D7 in Call Lingo Explained?   
    I made a math mistake in my post above in terms of how many call shifts/month (1 in 4 looks like 7 or 8 call shifts per full block).
    Friday+Sunday is a combination that happens frequently, but other than that it's fairly random, meaning it may be spaced out or may be grouped together. In terms of scheduling, you're at the mercy of whoever is making it (usually the chief residents or designated staff). Usually call switches are arranged between residents, though sometimes they will send out preliminary drafts for you to request for a switch from the scheduler directly.
  7. Thanks
    FrannieLydon reacted to 1D7 in Call Lingo Explained?   
    1 in 4 = 1 in 4 days for residents. Usually this is an average of number of call shifts/month, so you may be doing something like 4 call shifts in a span of 8 days but because it's looked at over a month, that's considered ~1 in 7. For staff it's a bit different since they are often referring to weeks, e.g. 1 in 4 weeks.
    Home call vs in-house call will determine the stipend you receive for each (it's marginally more with the in-house call), how many call shifts you can receive in a block (1 in 4 for in-house vs 1 in 3 for home), and the rules governing your post-call day (you not supposed to work post-call for in-house call). The numbers I posted may be different for provinces other than ON.
    For some specialties you are expected to be able to go home during home call, while for others it's in name only so you can consistently work post-call.
  8. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from yobologna in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    Can also vouch for Rod McFadden from Scotia in London. Exceptionally helpful, and has been doing this for a number of years now. 
    rod.mcfadden@scotiabank.com
  9. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from attyb1992 in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    Can also vouch for Rod McFadden from Scotia in London. Exceptionally helpful, and has been doing this for a number of years now. 
    rod.mcfadden@scotiabank.com
  10. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from guacamole17 in Academic and Non-academic Reference Letter   
    Agree with potentially asking the teacher. Teachers can certainly speak to alot of the soft skills that schools are looking for in med applicants and perhaps in a more intimate or personal way than someone you knew in a more formal academic setting and I wouldn't underestimate the power of someone speaking more personally about the particular skills you may have deployed in a classroom setting. 
  11. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from Bambi in Academic and Non-academic Reference Letter   
    Agree with potentially asking the teacher. Teachers can certainly speak to alot of the soft skills that schools are looking for in med applicants and perhaps in a more intimate or personal way than someone you knew in a more formal academic setting and I wouldn't underestimate the power of someone speaking more personally about the particular skills you may have deployed in a classroom setting. 
  12. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from Bambi in Is it rare to get in on your first or second try?   
    I think that it is also pretty variable. I mean we all have to admit that for a large portion of successful applicants it is a bit of a lottery. If you speak with individuals with experience on Adcoms/doing interviews, they will tell you that it is pretty hard to differentiate candidates. So candidate 1 who has similar stats/ a similar application to candidate 2, might get in first try, while it takes candidate 2 a few tries. The admission process is pretty subjective at many stages – so try not to over analyze it, shoot your shot, and hope for the best! 
  13. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from premed9876 in McMaster Waitlist Party 2020   
    You could be eligible to defer your Mac offer for a year if you were successful next year and finish out the year with your PI. I think that they would likely have some flexibility given the circumstances of how it all came about.  Def keep moving forward with your life/academic career. 
  14. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to ShadesofCyan in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    My general impression is that you can't go wrong with either RBC or Scotiabank. I agree the Scotia credit cards have better options for accruing points. I'm not a fan an AMEX though and I still find there are places that don't take it, especially when you travel. RBC letting you pay off your LOC whenever you want is what sold me, especially if you are considering a lengthy 5 year residency. 
    I think it is a personal decision at the end of the day. I get the impression banks used to offer different LOC rates to med students so you had to be very careful. Now much more streamlined and fair. 
  15. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from ShadesofCyan in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    Do you think the credit cards they offer are equivalent? I am thinking that the Amex Gold and Passport infinite are better than the avion infinite offered by RBC. Any other perspectives on this? 
  16. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to Onemoreday in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    I was too but I asked twice. Still in the process of confirming with other reps but just wanted to contribute what they told me till now.
  17. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to DrOtter in Has anybody applied for OSAP (2020-2021) yet?   
    I'm guessing mid-late July at the earliest because that's around the time the funding estimator goes live for next year as well. 
  18. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to Keyboards4Days in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    I just did this this year! It's actually not too tricky. I went from Scotiabank/BNS to RBC. 
    First had to meet with the RBC advisor and apply for their package. They ask you which credit cards you will close if you sign up for their package. I said none, and that seemed fine. Got approved, sent proof of enrolment, then had to do some other stuff next to make sure I don't get dinged by fees.
    Upgraded BNS account to their Ultimate package, then downgraded the Gold Amex to the normal Amex, but kept the Passport VI. The Ultimate package gets you the annual fee waiver for the Passport VI (+ a safety deposit box if that's useful to you). So long as I keep $5k in the chequing account I don't pay any fees. Alternatively you could downgrade the Passport VI to a more basic visa card with no fee, and switch the bank account to the student package. Then it's totally free, no minimum balance needed but no fancy CCs or safety deposit box. After going through all this, ask your rep to close your LOC and you're good to go. You could also just avoid going through all that and close your whole account with BNS.
    After that just had to get a letter confirming my LOC was closed to my RBC rep, then RBC package was set up.
    Hope this helps. 
  19. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to rmorelan in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    totally possible, and in fact since that can be done is the very thing that is keeping all these LOCs in check. It allows competition to exist which is great for us. Switching takes about 2 days - I have personally done that twice already. 
     
  20. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to Wachaa in Ask questions about family medicine here   
    It actual depends on the community itself and who's working there, distance from major centre, etc. Bonuses etc depend on what the province classifies as rural and as far as I know there isn't any black/ white definition based on size; just a classification "list".
    For example in BC, see here: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/health/practitioner-professional-resources/physician-compensation/rural-practice-programs/rural-retention-program
    In the Eligibility part of the page you can go to the links for rural definitions, points system, premium % etc.
     
    That's actually a very narrow view of what GIM does. GIM is there as a consultant as well as admitting patients on the wards. I would agree the rounding/ wards are similar. However the scope of the work is very different from that of a GP/ hospitalist. But yes, the argument for going to FM/ IM includes salary, residency training length...but also the scope of your future/ intended practice.
  21. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to magneto in Ask questions about family medicine here   
    Rural is usually defined by the province that you are working in. But I would say 20,000 population would be considered rural.
  22. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to coolcity in Has anyone had an email answered from Queen’s?   
    Hey everyone, probably a dumb question but just to confirm: you paid your deposit by setting Queens as a payee with your student # as the account #, then transferring the $1050?
    I just want to make sure I did it properly.
  23. Thanks
  24. Like
    FrannieLydon got a reaction from frenchpress in Finances   
    Also with a great interest rate, there is not necessarily a rush to pay the debt off – long term it might make more sense to hold the debt and invest your income for a better return.  
  25. Like
    FrannieLydon reacted to frenchpress in Finances   
    Prime -0.25 is always great in relative terms. But if prime is 6%, or 10% it’s not great in absolute terms. Which is not to fearmonger, but just to say that it’s important to remember that those interest rates can change, and you have no control over what it will be in 6-10 years when you’re done residency training and have access to that larger income to pay things off. Which is why I’ve always been shooting for that low end of the standard debt estimates personally. Although with the COVID recession/depression on the horizon, interest rates a likely to be low for while.
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