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Determinance

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  1. I was just thinking about that actually, that charging the patient for filling out forms would be private billing in a public clinic. Good to get clarification though that there's no technicalities with the higher-end stuff
  2. I'm a bit confused as to the regulations surrouding billing (not exclusive to GPs, I guess any specialty that can start their own clinic and offer private services would have the same conundrum). So obviously private billing is allowed-- so long as the service being billed for is not covered by OHIP-- for example, cosmetics bills entirely private. I'm also quite certain a physician would be allowed to bill both privately and publicly, i.e. a GP could do both hospitalist work and cosmetics on the side. But what about billing both privately and publically under the same clinic? I.
  3. This is something I've always been curious about, but I'm not quite sure how many opportunities I would have to pursue something like this (and find others interested in this kind of thing) in med school, given it runs almost completely contrary to clinical practice. It must be possible though-- I've heard of med students from UofT creating startups, and there was that one guy from UBC a long while back that basically patented a medical device while in med school. So I'm wondering, how would I be able to expose myself to the entrepreneurial side of health care in med school?
  4. To add another question onto this, the people I've spoken to about pain clinics often cite the "difficult" patient population as being a detractor. What exactly is meant by a "difficult" patient population in the context of pain clinics?
  5. I've been reading this over: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/ohip/bulletins/11000/bul11147.pdf I've only skimmed through from what I gather, NGEP is exclusive to newly graduated family medical doctors. It's also optional. A poignant stipulation to joining the NGEP is the [rather significant] restriction it puts on salary for new grads. For anyone who may know more about this, I'm curious, what would be the incentive for a family doctor who just finished residency to join NGEP? Is this currently the only viable option to join an FHO in a non high-need area? Should this be
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