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Caliver

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  1. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from apple94 in The Perfect Clerk   
    Make sure you show up early, don't complain about how long you are staying, how tired you are (you should complain about inappropriate behavior or lapse in professionalism), and are nice to everyone including allied health. Show some interest even if it is not your desired specialty, because it may be your last time doing that specialty ever. 
    You will be a great clerk if you can do those. You would be surprised at how many people don't do these things. 
  2. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from palefire in Differences Between Ontario Med Schools   
    lol. im from U of T (the pre-"foundation" era) and i had an awesome quality of life especially with living in downtown Toronto.
     
    There's not much difference in terms of quality of education you will get - you will be a fine med student if you are good. 
    What differs is the types of opportunities you get. You may get more hands-on experience at smaller schools while you may have more exposure to research in bigger schools. Having said that, people from smaller schools also do research at other institutions. Bigger schools also offer community rotations for maximum clinical exposure. 
     
    TL;DR Med school's what you make out of it and where you would enjoy living in. Pick after you get in. 
  3. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from duke101 in McGill v. U of T v. McMaster   
    A couple of searches would have been beneficial in answering your question. There's no clear cut answer in which school is better.
    A couple of points:
    1. Toronto also has cadaver labs (not sure how the recent curriculum changed the usual dissection stuff). 
    2. In the end, all three schools deliver similar material. The differences are how and when. Mac will use PBL more extensively than U of T/McGill. Mac will have three years while U of T/McGill have four. 
    3. Not true that Mac is "good" for prepping people for primary care residency vs. other schools. Mac is just as good as other schools in laying the foundation for you to do any specialty you want. It's "You" who need to decide and work on the specialty that you want to pursue.
    "International" reputation doesn't mean jack when it comes to CaRMS. For US matching, USMLE is king. 
    4. You need to decide where you want to live. It matters more than you think.
    In summary, figure out yourself and see which learning style and which city is the best for you. In my case, I chose Toronto because I already had my family and friends here and didn't mind the uber traditional curriculum. 
    Hope this helps. my $0.02 as a graduating med student. 
  4. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from PurpleS in McGill v. U of T v. McMaster   
    A couple of searches would have been beneficial in answering your question. There's no clear cut answer in which school is better.
    A couple of points:
    1. Toronto also has cadaver labs (not sure how the recent curriculum changed the usual dissection stuff). 
    2. In the end, all three schools deliver similar material. The differences are how and when. Mac will use PBL more extensively than U of T/McGill. Mac will have three years while U of T/McGill have four. 
    3. Not true that Mac is "good" for prepping people for primary care residency vs. other schools. Mac is just as good as other schools in laying the foundation for you to do any specialty you want. It's "You" who need to decide and work on the specialty that you want to pursue.
    "International" reputation doesn't mean jack when it comes to CaRMS. For US matching, USMLE is king. 
    4. You need to decide where you want to live. It matters more than you think.
    In summary, figure out yourself and see which learning style and which city is the best for you. In my case, I chose Toronto because I already had my family and friends here and didn't mind the uber traditional curriculum. 
    Hope this helps. my $0.02 as a graduating med student. 
  5. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from lulu95 in Differences Between Ontario Med Schools   
    lol. im from U of T (the pre-"foundation" era) and i had an awesome quality of life especially with living in downtown Toronto.
     
    There's not much difference in terms of quality of education you will get - you will be a fine med student if you are good. 
    What differs is the types of opportunities you get. You may get more hands-on experience at smaller schools while you may have more exposure to research in bigger schools. Having said that, people from smaller schools also do research at other institutions. Bigger schools also offer community rotations for maximum clinical exposure. 
     
    TL;DR Med school's what you make out of it and where you would enjoy living in. Pick after you get in. 
  6. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from tlDR in Ubc Or U Of T?   
    Many grads from each school gravitate towards staying in the same city for residency for a multitude of reasons, namely convenience, familiarity and connections. Moving to another city means that you will need to uproot yourself and potentially be in a completely different/unfamiliar system. 
     
    Having said that, people move to different cities. While statistics can be "important," it does not really show a complete picture and you can't judge your chance of matching in a certain city by looking at CaRMS matching statistics. Every school has a big proportion of their own students staying due to student and school factors. 
     
    In terms of UBC vs. U of T, I also had a similar dilemma four years ago. I chose U of T because Toronto is where my family and friends were. Fast forward four years, I am glad I did this because I needed this support in clerkship. I would have needed a year to establish and familiarize myself with Vancouver, had I moved (which isn't necessarily a bad thing though). 
     
    The decision really comes down to your personality. You need to be honest with yourself; do you want to live in Toronto or Vancouver for four years? Your pre-clinical/clinical experience will likely end up being similar despite inevitable differences in certain curriculum factors (i.e. when you do electives, where you do clerkship rotations). If you really want to end up in another city for residency, you can always do electives there to have "face time." I can tell you that program directors love competent students, not just students from their own institutions 
     
    TL;DR don't overthink this and be honest with yourself about which city you can see yourself living in for next four years. That's the most important. 
  7. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from RicardoKaká in Differences Between Ontario Med Schools   
    lol. im from U of T (the pre-"foundation" era) and i had an awesome quality of life especially with living in downtown Toronto.
     
    There's not much difference in terms of quality of education you will get - you will be a fine med student if you are good. 
    What differs is the types of opportunities you get. You may get more hands-on experience at smaller schools while you may have more exposure to research in bigger schools. Having said that, people from smaller schools also do research at other institutions. Bigger schools also offer community rotations for maximum clinical exposure. 
     
    TL;DR Med school's what you make out of it and where you would enjoy living in. Pick after you get in. 
  8. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from plane in Post-Carms Electives   
    I did post-carms elective in the specialty of my choice (a surgical one). I have to say, after 12 weeks of trying to impress people in the exact same field in different locations, I was quite burnt out. During my last two weeks, I was quite miserable actually. While I had no motivation to study, I still had to be on my game. Having said that, I know there are others who pull through fine. 
     
    The bottom line is that you have to be honest with yourself. I thought I could handle it but I clearly couldn't lol. You have to think about how you would be after doing core rotations + other rotations. 
     
    In terms of your questions: 
     
    1) doing these electives on this surgical specialty in a less desired location
     
    You will find that you don't have much control over where you can do your electives, especially if your specialty is a competitive one. You just take whatever opens up - some schools (e.g. Western) are notorious for answering late and it can be difficult to make schedules around some uncertainties. 
     
    2) doing them on your backup discipline
     
    This can be okay except you can't really get a letter out of the elective. If you need a letter from your elective (sometimes you just don't have enough "good quality" core letters), you might need to do it before CaRMS. If you are thinking of backing up, I'd personally rather do a pre-carms one in the backup specialty for a good letter and a post-carms one in your desired specialty, as you probably have enough letters in it. 
     
    3) doing something completely different or internationally
     
    This is a good idea too to blow off steam. After being away from home and friends for so long, I just wanted to be home lol. I personally thought I should have done family at my home institution during last two weeks. 
     
    Hope this helps
  9. Like
    Caliver got a reaction from GH0ST in Post-Carms Electives   
    I did post-carms elective in the specialty of my choice (a surgical one). I have to say, after 12 weeks of trying to impress people in the exact same field in different locations, I was quite burnt out. During my last two weeks, I was quite miserable actually. While I had no motivation to study, I still had to be on my game. Having said that, I know there are others who pull through fine. 
     
    The bottom line is that you have to be honest with yourself. I thought I could handle it but I clearly couldn't lol. You have to think about how you would be after doing core rotations + other rotations. 
     
    In terms of your questions: 
     
    1) doing these electives on this surgical specialty in a less desired location
     
    You will find that you don't have much control over where you can do your electives, especially if your specialty is a competitive one. You just take whatever opens up - some schools (e.g. Western) are notorious for answering late and it can be difficult to make schedules around some uncertainties. 
     
    2) doing them on your backup discipline
     
    This can be okay except you can't really get a letter out of the elective. If you need a letter from your elective (sometimes you just don't have enough "good quality" core letters), you might need to do it before CaRMS. If you are thinking of backing up, I'd personally rather do a pre-carms one in the backup specialty for a good letter and a post-carms one in your desired specialty, as you probably have enough letters in it. 
     
    3) doing something completely different or internationally
     
    This is a good idea too to blow off steam. After being away from home and friends for so long, I just wanted to be home lol. I personally thought I should have done family at my home institution during last two weeks. 
     
    Hope this helps
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