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14 hours ago, Chaxon said:

If this is as apparent as you guys believe wouldn’t someone be doing something about it? 

Or are you guys just hyping it up? Hmm..

 

 

The public perception of dentists is.....they make too much money. Even if we tried to do something, people would simply brush it off. At the end of the day, these big dent corps see the long-term outlook of $$$, production and dental factories rather than pursuing patient-centred care. Personally, I know someone who has 32 clinics and keeps buying out others to get a big dental corp to buy him out. Now imagine a dental corp owning all those clinics, giving associates jobs but expecting production all the time. Yeah dentistry is changing..but still good take-home income  -_-

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I find it LAUGHABLE that all of you are going into this field for the MONEY. I, for one, am choosing to go into this career to ENJOY the unique and uncomparable experiences of the field of dentistry.

Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL. Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try t

Young grads better brace themselves.

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Are people on these forums generally more pessimistic or is dentistry really going downhill from here? Cause you can never trust everything on the internet... I always thought dentists make at least 300K+ Mid career after overhead and is generally a fantastic career despite high tuition fees...

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42 minutes ago, peace2014 said:

Are people on these forums generally more pessimistic or is dentistry really going downhill from here? Cause you can never trust everything on the internet... I always thought dentists make at least 300K+ Mid career after overhead and is generally a fantastic career despite high tuition fees...

hit up steins gate...hes in his 2nd year of uoft dent and got two 500k jobs lined up in toronto and around gta ;)

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12 hours ago, peace2014 said:

Are people on these forums generally more pessimistic or is dentistry really going downhill from here? Cause you can never trust everything on the internet... I always thought dentists make at least 300K+ Mid career after overhead and is generally a fantastic career despite high tuition fees...

Hah, this couldn't be more wrong. You can definitely make 300+, I would say only a minority of dentists are making that much. 

If you are working in a big saturated city then only a small fraction are taking home that much. I don't know any of my classmates working in the city taking home anywhere near that. 

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10 hours ago, Lvl3sonly said:

Hah, this couldn't be more wrong. You can definitely make 300+, I would say only a minority of dentists are making that much. 

If you are working in a big saturated city then only a small fraction are taking home that much. I don't know any of my classmates working in the city taking home anywhere near that. 

Do you know anyone outside the city taking home near that?

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  • 3 months later...

You should be glad that many dentists all over the world come to your country to contribute to it’s economy. Not saying that it is our goal to do so but we do. Nobody,  not even foreign nationals are exempted from paying tax. 

Also, like you said that 3 exams are not equivalent to the 4 year studies you do, kindly do your homework because every exam is help within a gap of 6 months so giving 3 exams + 1 OSCE takes about 2-2.5 years. Trust me, it’s no joke. Also, I truly believe that the NDEB is very strict with the evaluation and doesn’t hesitate when it comes to failing students. It will definitely not give a license to unworthy and undeserving foreign dentists and hence, the pass rates of the equivalency process are comparatively lower :)

 

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On 10/21/2019 at 5:17 PM, Sadaf said:

You should be glad that many dentists all over the world come to your country to contribute to it’s economy. Not saying that it is our goal to do so but we do. Nobody,  not even foreign nationals are exempted from paying tax. 

Also, like you said that 3 exams are not equivalent to the 4 year studies you do, kindly do your homework because every exam is help within a gap of 6 months so giving 3 exams + 1 OSCE takes about 2-2.5 years. Trust me, it’s no joke. Also, I truly believe that the NDEB is very strict with the evaluation and doesn’t hesitate when it comes to failing students. It will definitely not give a license to unworthy and undeserving foreign dentists and hence, the pass rates of the equivalency process are comparatively lower :)

 

Tax? The Over-saturation and destruction of a profession is ok because it means more tax dollars for the government? The increase in number of dentists does not mean more tax dollars, the amount of procedures done should be the same in a saturated market scenario. It just means a smaller piece of the pie for everyone, including yourself.

The exams take a few hours. The time spent studying for it at home does not qualify as “training” or “dental school”. That is an absolutely ludicrous comparison.

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On 10/21/2019 at 6:17 PM, Sadaf said:

You should be glad that many dentists all over the world come to your country to contribute to it’s economy. Not saying that it is our goal to do so but we do. Nobody,  not even foreign nationals are exempted from paying tax. 

Also, like you said that 3 exams are not equivalent to the 4 year studies you do, kindly do your homework because every exam is help within a gap of 6 months so giving 3 exams + 1 OSCE takes about 2-2.5 years. Trust me, it’s no joke. Also, I truly believe that the NDEB is very strict with the evaluation and doesn’t hesitate when it comes to failing students. It will definitely not give a license to unworthy and undeserving foreign dentists and hence, the pass rates of the equivalency process are comparatively lower :)

 

Foreign trained dentists don't come to Canada to contribute to its economy. They come to make a better lives for themselves. Of course they do; that's the expectation, that's what any immigrant does, and obviously we want them to have skills and lives that contribute to our society.

That said, the complicating layer on top of all of this is that we are not talking about foreign-trained professionals of all types or of skilled immigrants as a whole, but rather specifically of dental professionals. That means that the issue goes beyond "should we let anyone in" to "is there any need for this and how does it affect the landscape of dental care for Canadians"?

A race to the top is just as bad as a race to the bottom. Right now both are happening. A race to the top in terms of practice valuations because the cost of education, real estate, etc. is so high, along with cheap credit, and a race to the bottom because quality of care is slipping, volume of dentistry is going up, and there's more and more corner and cost cutting to be 'competitive.' 

To be perfectly frank, admitting hundreds of foreign trained dentists a year is only going to worsen both issues. Not because foreign trained dentists bring lots of money, and not because I think they are any less scrupulous than domestic dentists, but because the influx of an otherwise unneeded amount of practitioners causes these effects across the board. No one is innocent and no one is unaffected. 

The arguments against this always revolve around 'access to care,' and obviously I live in Southwestern Ontario and am biased, but there is no access to care issues in about 95% of Ontario. If there was a way to get dentists to that last 5% and that involved incentivizing foreign trained dentists to do it, I'm all for it, but there is nothing of the sort set up, and it is naturally somewhat unreasonable to expect recent immigrants to move to areas lacking care; they didn't move to Canada to live in a town of 2000 people. Inevitably, this entire thing is by and large a money grab by the education and regulation infrastructure meant to take advantage of the desire of hard-working people to understandably make a better lives for themselves, even if it means moving halfway across the world. But they have managed to ignore all of the downstream consequences of such a con. It's also a way for the dental schools to be lazy and hog any money that would normally be outset for expanding class sizes. Instead, just collect money and administer an exam. Done. Our profession has an extremely short-sighted viewpoint, much like the real estate industry, unfortunately.

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3 hours ago, cleanup said:

Foreign trained dentists don't come to Canada to contribute to its economy. They come to make a better lives for themselves. Of course they do; that's the expectation, that's what any immigrant does, and obviously we want them to have skills and lives that contribute to our society.

That said, the complicating layer on top of all of this is that we are not talking about foreign-trained professionals of all types or of skilled immigrants as a whole, but rather specifically of dental professionals. That means that the issue goes beyond "should we let anyone in" to "is there any need for this and how does it affect the landscape of dental care for Canadians"?

A race to the top is just as bad as a race to the bottom. Right now both are happening. A race to the top in terms of practice valuations because the cost of education, real estate, etc. is so high, along with cheap credit, and a race to the bottom because quality of care is slipping, volume of dentistry is going up, and there's more and more corner and cost cutting to be 'competitive.' 

To be perfectly frank, admitting hundreds of foreign trained dentists a year is only going to worsen both issues. Not because foreign trained dentists bring lots of money, and not because I think they are any less scrupulous than domestic dentists, but because the influx of an otherwise unneeded amount of practitioners causes these effects across the board. No one is innocent and no one is unaffected. 

The arguments against this always revolve around 'access to care,' and obviously I live in Southwestern Ontario and am biased, but there is no access to care issues in about 95% of Ontario. If there was a way to get dentists to that last 5% and that involved incentivizing foreign trained dentists to do it, I'm all for it, but there is nothing of the sort set up, and it is naturally somewhat unreasonable to expect recent immigrants to move to areas lacking care; they didn't move to Canada to live in a town of 2000 people. Inevitably, this entire thing is by and large a money grab by the education and regulation infrastructure meant to take advantage of the desire of hard-working people to understandably make a better lives for themselves, even if it means moving halfway across the world. But they have managed to ignore all of the downstream consequences of such a con. It's also a way for the dental schools to be lazy and hog any money that would normally be outset for expanding class sizes. Instead, just collect money and administer an exam. Done. Our profession has an extremely short-sighted viewpoint, much like the real estate industry, unfortunately.

Extremely astute observation. 

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19 hours ago, Everclear said:

Tax? The Over-saturation and destruction of a profession is ok because it means more tax dollars for the government? The increase in number of dentists does not mean more tax dollars, the amount of procedures done should be the same in a saturated market scenario. It just means a smaller piece of the pie for everyone, including yourself.

The exams take a few hours. The time spent studying for it at home does not qualify as “training” or “dental school”. That is an absolutely ludicrous comparison.

 Your argument honestly, doesn’t make any sense to me. We’re not a bunch of quacks who come to Canada and try our luck with these exams. We hold a valid degree although, the commonwealth countries recognizes it as “non-accredited” and provide us with different pathways to choose in order to get a legal licensure to practice. It doesn’t make us any less of a dentist than you are. It’s unjust to judge our skills just because we don’t belong those 5 countries. 

Also, as I had mentioned earlier, there are 4 parts to the NDEB which are held every 6 months. So, it takes about 2 years to pass all the 4 parts. If spending 6 months of our lives on each exam is not sufficient for you, then I don’t know what is. 

And, 1 exam is meant to last for a few hours and not days.

 

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6 hours ago, cleanup said:

Foreign trained dentists don't come to Canada to contribute to its economy. They come to make a better lives for themselves. Of course they do; that's the expectation, that's what any immigrant does, and obviously we want them to have skills and lives that contribute to our society.

That said, the complicating layer on top of all of this is that we are not talking about foreign-trained professionals of all types or of skilled immigrants as a whole, but rather specifically of dental professionals. That means that the issue goes beyond "should we let anyone in" to "is there any need for this and how does it affect the landscape of dental care for Canadians"?

A race to the top is just as bad as a race to the bottom. Right now both are happening. A race to the top in terms of practice valuations because the cost of education, real estate, etc. is so high, along with cheap credit, and a race to the bottom because quality of care is slipping, volume of dentistry is going up, and there's more and more corner and cost cutting to be 'competitive.' 

To be perfectly frank, admitting hundreds of foreign trained dentists a year is only going to worsen both issues. Not because foreign trained dentists bring lots of money, and not because I think they are any less scrupulous than domestic dentists, but because the influx of an otherwise unneeded amount of practitioners causes these effects across the board. No one is innocent and no one is unaffected. 

The arguments against this always revolve around 'access to care,' and obviously I live in Southwestern Ontario and am biased, but there is no access to care issues in about 95% of Ontario. If there was a way to get dentists to that last 5% and that involved incentivizing foreign trained dentists to do it, I'm all for it, but there is nothing of the sort set up, and it is naturally somewhat unreasonable to expect recent immigrants to move to areas lacking care; they didn't move to Canada to live in a town of 2000 people. Inevitably, this entire thing is by and large a money grab by the education and regulation infrastructure meant to take advantage of the desire of hard-working people to understandably make a better lives for themselves, even if it means moving halfway across the world. But they have managed to ignore all of the downstream consequences of such a con. It's also a way for the dental schools to be lazy and hog any money that would normally be outset for expanding class sizes. Instead, just collect money and administer an exam. Done. Our profession has an extremely short-sighted viewpoint, much like the real estate industry, unfortunately.

What do you think about the possibility of more corners being cut to get patients and do high yield procedures with the possibility of dental care being implemented by the NDP/liberals? I think you mentioned on another thread that dental care would be devastating to dentists..Higher taxes to pay for it, less payout from the government and large patients increase...how do you think it'll play out?

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1 hour ago, Sadaf said:

 Your argument honestly, doesn’t make any sense to me. We’re not a bunch of quacks who come to Canada and try our luck with these exams. We hold a valid degree although, the commonwealth countries recognizes it as “non-accredited” and provide us with different pathways to choose in order to get a legal licensure to practice. It doesn’t make us any less of a dentist than you are. It’s unjust to judge our skills just because we don’t belong those 5 countries. 

Also, as I had mentioned earlier, there are 4 parts to the NDEB which are held every 6 months. So, it takes about 2 years to pass all the 4 parts. If spending 6 months of our lives on each exam is not sufficient for you, then I don’t know what is. 

And, 1 exam is meant to last for a few hours and not days.

 

I never said you were a bunch of quacks. The schools that international dentists graduate from are non-accrediated i.e a Canadian agency has not verified the robustness of the curriculum or how complete the education is and if it meets Canadian standards. Tell me what part of that statement is incorrect.

 

“If spending 6 months of our lives on each exam is not sufficient for you, then I don’t know what is.”

I don’t know, how about maybe completing a 4 year program at an accrediated school? Or at least 2 years? It doesn’t matter how long you study for an exam, I could study for my driving exam for 10 years but that doesn’t make me a formula one driver. What matters is the ability of the exams to accurately gauge the competency of dentists. I believe there is no way 3-4 exams can replace 4 years at an accredited program. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Everclear said:

I never said you were a bunch of quacks. The schools that international dentists graduate from are non-accrediated i.e a Canadian agency has not verified the robustness of the curriculum or how complete the education is and if it meets Canadian standards. Tell me what part of that statement is incorrect.

 

“If spending 6 months of our lives on each exam is not sufficient for you, then I don’t know what is.”

I don’t know, how about maybe completing a 4 year program at an accrediated school? Or at least 2 years? It doesn’t matter how long you study for an exam, I could study for my driving exam for 10 years but that doesn’t make me a formula one driver. What matters is the ability of the exams to accurately gauge the competency of dentists. I believe there is no way 3-4 exams can replace 4 years at an accredited program. 

 

 

1 home run is better than 2 doubles. At the end of the day, no matter how much time you spend in a dental school, what really matters is the quality of work. I’m a true believer of “work smarter, not harder” :)

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12 hours ago, Sadaf said:

1 home run is better than 2 doubles. At the end of the day, no matter how much time you spend in a dental school, what really matters is the quality of work. I’m a true believer of “work smarter, not harder” :)

Not sure what you’re trying to say here with the 1 home run is better than 2 doubles comment. It does matter the amount of time you spend in dental school because time spent must have some correlation to quality of work and knowledge to safely treat patients, this is why you won’t find accredited dental schools which are 1-2 years in length.

Anyway, I’m not saying that ITDs do bad work. I’m saying the system of accrediting their credentials is broken and insufficient to assure that the knowledge and skill of ITDs are on par with Canadian standards.

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On 10/23/2019 at 9:12 PM, Compton said:

What do you think about the possibility of more corners being cut to get patients and do high yield procedures with the possibility of dental care being implemented by the NDP/liberals? I think you mentioned on another thread that dental care would be devastating to dentists..Higher taxes to pay for it, less payout from the government and large patients increase...how do you think it'll play out?

If some form of universal dental care is actually implemented, it will only be for folks who qualify by virtue of having less than a certain amount of taxable income. The question that remains is what type, level & form of coverage is actually given. Several years ago the Ontario Disability Support Program, which already provided dental coverage for its members, covered about 80% of the fee from the Ontario fee guide. Dentists were obviously fine with this, even if they had to write off the 20% (which they always do; no patient who has government coverage is going to pay the co-pay, they will simply find a dentist who offers to do all work on assignment, while writing off the co-pay, and that has become the norm even for regular insurance patients sometimes). The reason is because there weren't really too many checks & balances in place with respect to *how much* dentistry you could do, but only *what types*. Otherwise, if it satisfied the type, and there wasn't recent treatment done on that tooth, it would be covered.

You can reasonably expect this leads to a lot of abuse of the system by both dentists and by patients. Dentists become gun-happy because they know treatment is covered and patients are agreeable (when it's free), and patients become system-abusers because the norm is established that their treatment is always free (as long as it falls within a certain scope of treatment) and the dentist is expected to do it. To be frank, this is not unlike how the landscape of family medicine has changed. A lot of patients, a lot of simple visits, a focus on volume rather than quality, and a huge bill for the government. The difference is that powerful medical associations and lobbies are able to keep this going, and the war of attrition between the medical community and the government progresses in either direction much more slowly, a bit like a strained and unhappy but essential marriage.

Then a few years ago the program wised up to the financial abuse of the system and lowered their coverage to 30%, thinking that patients would shell out the 50% differential. Surprise: that didn't happen. This results in dentists being much more wary of ODSP patients (which is a good thing), but also in ODSP patients receiving poorer care in certain instances (30% coverage is essentially losing money by treating, so dentists are far less likely to go out of their way or go above/beyond to help patients). Double-edged swords galore.

A huge reason why a lot of people on ODSP have bad teeth is not because of whatever disability they have (although this certainly plays a role), but because of this willy-nilly system that lacks checks & balances.

The reason why private, due-on-service dentistry is more careful is because there is someone actually footing the bill who has something to lose by footing it, whether that be the patient or their insurance company, or their employer. This means that people are much more scrutinizing of what's being done, dentists are more mindful of their treatment plans (and don't want to get in hot water with anyone), and the qualify of work is higher.

That's the main issue I have with universal coverage. It places the admittedly idealistic and moral desire to have universal coverage for a common health problem and pits it against the shitty, less-than-desirable aspects of human nature (greed, entitlement, a lack of empathy). 

If some form of universal dental care is implemented by the federal government, it will be of a similar capacity, albeit with income qualifications rather than medical ones. It is also ripe for abuse on both sides of the coin. 

The correct incentives aren't there. Personally, I do believe in some form of universal dental care but more in the form of how Massachusetts does their universal healthcare: by requiring employers to insure their employees in some way by law. It is opt-out only. It basically means, yes, we will help you, but there is a line where personal responsibility is drawn. Either that or universal basic income, which I am a big fan of because it allows people to prioritize and pick-and-choose where in their lives they need financial assistance.

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1 hour ago, cleanup said:

Then a few years ago the program wised up to the financial abuse of the system and lowered their coverage to 30%, thinking that patients would shell out the 50% differential. 

There is no such thing as a co-pay for ODSP or similar programs.  They are considered to pay 100% of the fee, even if they only pay 30%.  It is fraudulent to try to collect anything additional from such a patient.  I believe that's always been the case.

Also, it's been more than a few years since fees were around 80%.  I think more like 20 years.

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1 hour ago, Ostracized said:

There is no such thing as a co-pay for ODSP or similar programs.  They are considered to pay 100% of the fee, even if they only pay 30%.  It is fraudulent to try to collect anything additional from such a patient.  I believe that's always been the case.

Also, it's been more than a few years since fees were around 80%.  I think more like 20 years.

You’re right. I was inaccurate. There’s a separate dedicated schedule/fee guide for it. 

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On 10/23/2019 at 12:02 PM, cleanup said:

Foreign trained dentists don't come to Canada to contribute to its economy. They come to make a better lives for themselves. Of course they do; that's the expectation, that's what any immigrant does, and obviously we want them to have skills and lives that contribute to our society.

That said, the complicating layer on top of all of this is that we are not talking about foreign-trained professionals of all types or of skilled immigrants as a whole, but rather specifically of dental professionals. That means that the issue goes beyond "should we let anyone in" to "is there any need for this and how does it affect the landscape of dental care for Canadians"?

A race to the top is just as bad as a race to the bottom. Right now both are happening. A race to the top in terms of practice valuations because the cost of education, real estate, etc. is so high, along with cheap credit, and a race to the bottom because quality of care is slipping, volume of dentistry is going up, and there's more and more corner and cost cutting to be 'competitive.' 

To be perfectly frank, admitting hundreds of foreign trained dentists a year is only going to worsen both issues. Not because foreign trained dentists bring lots of money, and not because I think they are any less scrupulous than domestic dentists, but because the influx of an otherwise unneeded amount of practitioners causes these effects across the board. No one is innocent and no one is unaffected. 

The arguments against this always revolve around 'access to care,' and obviously I live in Southwestern Ontario and am biased, but there is no access to care issues in about 95% of Ontario. If there was a way to get dentists to that last 5% and that involved incentivizing foreign trained dentists to do it, I'm all for it, but there is nothing of the sort set up, and it is naturally somewhat unreasonable to expect recent immigrants to move to areas lacking care; they didn't move to Canada to live in a town of 2000 people. Inevitably, this entire thing is by and large a money grab by the education and regulation infrastructure meant to take advantage of the desire of hard-working people to understandably make a better lives for themselves, even if it means moving halfway across the world. But they have managed to ignore all of the downstream consequences of such a con. It's also a way for the dental schools to be lazy and hog any money that would normally be outset for expanding class sizes. Instead, just collect money and administer an exam. Done. Our profession has an extremely short-sighted viewpoint, much like the real estate industry, unfortunately.

Agree with almost everything you said. Although I've actually noticed more FTDs moving out to rural areas nowadays.

On 10/23/2019 at 4:36 PM, Sadaf said:

 Your argument honestly, doesn’t make any sense to me. We’re not a bunch of quacks who come to Canada and try our luck with these exams. We hold a valid degree although, the commonwealth countries recognizes it as “non-accredited” and provide us with different pathways to choose in order to get a legal licensure to practice. It doesn’t make us any less of a dentist than you are. It’s unjust to judge our skills just because we don’t belong those 5 countries. 

Also, as I had mentioned earlier, there are 4 parts to the NDEB which are held every 6 months. So, it takes about 2 years to pass all the 4 parts. If spending 6 months of our lives on each exam is not sufficient for you, then I don’t know what is. 

And, 1 exam is meant to last for a few hours and not days.

 

I've seen the work FTDs do and generally they are extremely lacking compared to domsetic or even US/Australia grads. I worked with a guy who didn't even know basic endodontic pulpal/apical diagnosis. The standards of training in dental schools in certain parts of the world are frankly garbage. 

On 10/24/2019 at 8:11 AM, Everclear said:

Not sure what you’re trying to say here with the 1 home run is better than 2 doubles comment. It does matter the amount of time you spend in dental school because time spent must have some correlation to quality of work and knowledge to safely treat patients, this is why you won’t find accredited dental schools which are 1-2 years in length.

Anyway, I’m not saying that ITDs do bad work. I’m saying the system of accrediting their credentials is broken and insufficient to assure that the knowledge and skill of ITDs are on par with Canadian standards.

You're not gonna say it so I will. I've seen tons of bad work from ITDs. Not just technical skills, but in diagnosis as well, both misdiagnosis and overdiagnosis. I would never recommend my friends go to a ftd. There are of course exceptions to the rule. I've seen dentists from 1st world european countries and they are excellent. 

On 10/26/2019 at 9:06 AM, Ostracized said:

There is no such thing as a co-pay for ODSP or similar programs.  They are considered to pay 100% of the fee, even if they only pay 30%.  It is fraudulent to try to collect anything additional from such a patient.  I believe that's always been the case.

Also, it's been more than a few years since fees were around 80%.  I think more like 20 years.

Even though it may be technically fraudulent tons of offices are asking for the copay. Very common in BC for that to happen.

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56 minutes ago, Lvl3sonly said:

I've seen the work FTDs do and generally they are extremely lacking compared to domsetic or even US/Australia grads. I worked with a guy who didn't even know basic endodontic pulpal/apical diagnosis. The standards of training in dental schools in certain parts of the world are frankly garbage. 

You're not gonna say it so I will. I've seen tons of bad work from ITDs. Not just technical skills, but in diagnosis as well, both misdiagnosis and overdiagnosis. I would never recommend my friends go to a ftd. There are of course exceptions to the rule. I've seen dentists from 1st world european countries and they are excellent. 

Not a dentist but isn't this a problem with the assessment/licensing system for dentists in the end? 

If dentists are passing the exam, obtaining their license, but still providing subpar work, it seems like the NDEB hasn't assessed them properly and the concern or advocacy should be with them in raising their standards and not with the dentists who follow their 2 year assessment process successfully to ultimately become licensed in Canada?

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7 hours ago, Lvl3sonly said:

Agree with almost everything you said. Although I've actually noticed more FTDs moving out to rural areas nowadays.

I've seen the work FTDs do and generally they are extremely lacking compared to domsetic or even US/Australia grads. I worked with a guy who didn't even know basic endodontic pulpal/apical diagnosis. The standards of training in dental schools in certain parts of the world are frankly garbage. 

You're not gonna say it so I will. I've seen tons of bad work from ITDs. Not just technical skills, but in diagnosis as well, both misdiagnosis and overdiagnosis. I would never recommend my friends go to a ftd. There are of course exceptions to the rule. I've seen dentists from 1st world european countries and they are excellent. 

Even though it may be technically fraudulent tons of offices are asking for the copay. Very common in BC for that to happen.

I once took my grandfather to your so called “brilliant canadian dentist” and he he happened to extract the wrong tooth which was going to serve as an abutment tooth for his prosthesis. 

It’s honestly people’s mindset that dentists  who are trained in the first world countries are amazing at work whereas ITDs from third world countries are garbage. I don’t know understand why people generalize. Given the above example, I could easily say that canadian dentists are garbage too but, I won’t. Because humans are meant to make mistakes. 

The stereotype has got to end someday.

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