Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

What to do during M1/M2?


Recommended Posts

In undergrad it was volunteering, focus on GPA, MCAT etc but im wondering what my focus should be in M1/M2

I'm interested in emergency medicine but of course that could change

 

I just want to know what i should be doing as far as observerships etc to starting building a good application

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keep up with your readings, study, shadow EM docs, try to get involved with research, talk to seniors interested in EM, join the EM interest group, inquire about opportunities, network and meet EM residents. Go to EM conferences, network, meet PDs, demonstrate interest, read about EM news in your free time. It is obvious when someone loves the specialty they are applying for when you just talk to them, because they just know so much about it. 

In M1 and 2 though, I would explore first, what you like going in is rarely what you like coming out, but the things I said above apply for all specialties. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Edict said:

Keep up with your readings, study, shadow EM docs, try to get involved with research, talk to seniors interested in EM, join the EM interest group, inquire about opportunities, network and meet EM residents. Go to EM conferences, network, meet PDs, demonstrate interest, read about EM news in your free time. It is obvious when someone loves the specialty they are applying for when you just talk to them, because they just know so much about it. 

In M1 and 2 though, I would explore first, what you like going in is rarely what you like coming out, but the things I said above apply for all specialties. 

When do you think is a good time to get involved in research? Are there certain basics you should cover in classes first or is it best to just jump right in and learn as you go?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, excelspreadsheet said:

When do you think is a good time to get involved in research? Are there certain basics you should cover in classes first or is it best to just jump right in and learn as you go?

Honestly as early as you can, get yourself settled in the first few months, but if you have a lead now pursue it, you can start looking as soon as you settle into med school, however long that takes you. Research takes a long time, an idea to an actual paper usually takes a year or longer and theres lots of roadblocks, delays and failures. Papers you start in preclerkship are the ones most likely to result in a publication by the time you apply for CaRMS. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Edict said:

Keep up with your readings, study, shadow EM docs, try to get involved with research, talk to seniors interested in EM, join the EM interest group, inquire about opportunities, network and meet EM residents. Go to EM conferences, network, meet PDs, demonstrate interest, read about EM news in your free time. It is obvious when someone loves the specialty they are applying for when you just talk to them, because they just know so much about it. 

In M1 and 2 though, I would explore first, what you like going in is rarely what you like coming out, but the things I said above apply for all specialties. 

 

22 hours ago, #YOLO said:

honestly. get hammered. engage in recreational substances. and have intercourse. 

 

As polar opposite as these posts are, both are valid. First of all figure out what you want in life re: work/other priorities, which will help you decide what specialty you might be interested in; then look at the competitiveness of the specialty of your interest. You can take either of the above approaches or something in between depending on how competitive what you want is. While I respectfully disagree with Edict that their approach applies for all specialties, for ER I would definitely agree that you need to be the early bird.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Hanmari that you don't need to those things for all specialties. They would work for all specialties, but you don't need them for many. The more competitive a specialty though, the more things you want to do to make yourself seem competitive. the 5 year EM residency is very competitive as you probably know and definitely you want to know early on if you like this or not. You'll know when you shadow and when you talk to the residents and the attendings. You get a sense of the culture, the fit, the hours, the cases, the day to day by shadowing and networking. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Hanmari said:

 

 

As polar opposite as these posts are, both are valid. First of all figure out what you want in life re: work/other priorities, which will help you decide what specialty you might be interested in; then look at the competitiveness of the specialty of your interest. You can take either of the above approaches or something in between depending on how competitive what you want is. While I respectfully disagree with Edict that their approach applies for all specialties, for ER I would definitely agree that you need to be the early bird.

Is there a website/forum that shows the relative competitiveness of residencies and what they value in applicants?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Edict said:

I agree with Hanmari that you don't need to those things for all specialties. They would work for all specialties, but you don't need them for many. The more competitive a specialty though, the more things you want to do to make yourself seem competitive. the 5 year EM residency is very competitive as you probably know and definitely you want to know early on if you like this or not. You'll know when you shadow and when you talk to the residents and the attendings. You get a sense of the culture, the fit, the hours, the cases, the day to day by shadowing and networking. 

Is there a website/forum that shows the relative competitiveness of residencies and what they value in applicants?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, canlrn96 said:

Is there a website/forum that shows the relative competitiveness of residencies and what they value in applicants?

CaRMS data reports. Other stuff you can sort of get from looking at various websites on the web. Theres some CMA specialty profiles you can explore. There are also some of those things in various books or online but mainly geared for the US. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Best use of time is figuring out what you want to do. Try to narrow it down to 3 or fewer specialties. Then spend 1-2 weeks in each over the entire school year/summer—most schools have some sort of preclerkship elective opportunities that you can register once you've found a preceptor. Don't pigeonhole yourself before you've explored at least 2 specialties. If it's a competitive specialty like EM, deciding earlier is better. You probably want to decide by the summer of M1 so you have at least 1 year to do some focused activities in your specialty of interest (assuming you're in a 4 year school, otherwise you'll want to decide even earlier).

Next best use of time is some sort of research (do something clinical since it's more likely to get published). It's a tickbox for most programs, but it's a tickbox you might as well check off to maximize your opportunities.

And as #YOLO mentioned, you should try to enjoy those 2 years. It will probably be the least busy, or at least the most flexible time of your life for a long time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...