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Pediatric Specialties with shift work?


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I am wondering how many paediatric specialties have shift work? I assume neonatologists would, and PICU docs. But the endo, general, and cards peds docs I talked to were all salaried with 4 weeks a year. I just prefer shift work or being able to take time to pursue other things going on in my life, and enjoy pediatrics a lot. I have read about peds hospitalist, is that common? Preliminary search of provincial physician job postings doesn't make it seem so. I'd even take a pay hit to have more off, but from what I understand if salaried that isn't really possible. 

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1 hour ago, gingerbread12 said:

I am wondering how many paediatric specialties have shift work? I assume neonatologists would, and PICU docs. But the endo, general, and cards peds docs I talked to were all salaried with 4 weeks a year. I just prefer shift work or being able to take time to pursue other things going on in my life, and enjoy pediatrics a lot. I have read about peds hospitalist, is that common? Preliminary search of provincial physician job postings doesn't make it seem so. I'd even take a pay hit to have more off, but from what I understand if salaried that isn't really possible. 

I don't think NICU or PICU staff typically work "shifts". Outside of emerg coverage, few if any staff physicians do straight shift work. There are probably part time positions around, but what you seem to be looking for is locum work not a full-time permanent position. As for hospitalists, that's the domain of family docs and the adult world. There aren't enough pediatric inpatients outside of the big centres for that kind of work. 

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32 minutes ago, A-Stark said:

I don't think NICU or PICU staff typically work "shifts". Outside of emerg coverage, few if any staff physicians do straight shift work. There are probably part time positions around, but what you seem to be looking for is locum work not a full-time permanent position. As for hospitalists, that's the domain of family docs and the adult world. There aren't enough pediatric inpatients outside of the big centres for that kind of work. 

Maybe shift is the wrong word, but I thought they would sort of work 1-2 weeks on and 1-2 off. Although this could be american information for sure. 

True I would say I am definitely looking more at a locum or part-time position. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/9/2018 at 4:11 PM, gingerbread12 said:

I am wondering how many paediatric specialties have shift work? I assume neonatologists would, and PICU docs. But the endo, general, and cards peds docs I talked to were all salaried with 4 weeks a year. I just prefer shift work or being able to take time to pursue other things going on in my life, and enjoy pediatrics a lot. I have read about peds hospitalist, is that common? Preliminary search of provincial physician job postings doesn't make it seem so. I'd even take a pay hit to have more off, but from what I understand if salaried that isn't really possible. 

If you mean like 12 hours on then 12 hours off then really it's just Peds Emerg. If you mean like working a limited number of weeks a year, or working only a few days a week, you definitely can do that in pediatrics. As a general pediatrician if you just do consultant outpatient peds you can set your own hours. I've seen a lot of general pediatricians and subspecialists who cover a hospital ward x number of weeks a year, and then work x number of days a week in clinic when they're not on service. How many days that is will be a negotiation between you and the hospital that hires you. If you specialize in a procedure specialty IE cardiology or Gastroenterology where you need a hospital you will be more limited as you have to work with a hospital which will dictate your hours and not be complete freedom. But the ability to only work two days a week if you want or work every day from say 12-4 if you so choose is an appealing aspect of pediatrics.

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