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Hello to all!


I have just failed the clinical part of the PCE in Alberta. Failing probably isn't that big a deal because failures are what makes us more wiser and stronger, but I really can't afford it the next time I attempt the exam because I am not that financially good. I had taken local exam prep courses privately which were funded by my family and also the PCE mock test from Uni of alberta and I literally remembered everything from O'Sulivan but nothing saved me from failing.

Folks, what kills me the most is that the people who were in my study group who were not that great have passed.

May be you guys can share some tips or experiences and what works and what doesn't, will help me pass the exam next time hopefully.

 

Thanks a ton in advance!

 

P.S. (being an immigrant) I really want to join the Bridging course offered by UofAlberta but it is shockingly pricy around 13 grand and sadly can't afford it

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3 hours ago, PCE FIghter said:

Hello to all!


I have just failed the clinical part of the PCE in Alberta. Failing probably isn't that big a deal because failures are what makes us more wiser and stronger, but I really can't afford it the next time I attempt the exam because I am not that financially good. I had taken local exam prep courses privately which were funded by my family and also the PCE mock test from Uni of alberta and I literally remembered everything from O'Sulivan but nothing saved me from failing.

Folks, what kills me the most is that the people who were in my study group who were not that great have passed.

May be you guys can share some tips or experiences and what works and what doesn't, will help me pass the exam next time hopefully.

 

Thanks a ton in advance!

 

P.S. (being an immigrant) I really want to join the Bridging course offered by UofAlberta but it is shockingly pricy around 13 grand and sadly can't afford it

I don't have experience but the first place I would go to ask for performance feedback is your clinical professors. If they oversee your clinical work they would be able to provide an accurate assessment of your skills. Best of luck!

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I recently graduated from U of T and passed both exams on the first try. Now that my credentials are out of the way, I'll add some advice:

1. I'd recommend PT Development Institute if you're going to take a prep course. Not sure if they offer it in Alberta, but it's probably the best prep course out there. 

2. Analyze why you failed, was it because of a lack of skills or did you get nervous/flustered during the exam itself? For the skills, have a partner and/or study group and practice running through scenarios endlessly. After each scenario, look at what mistakes you made and write them down, so you eliminate them for next time. Use the exact timers that are used in the exam itself, a minute to read and a buzzer at 4 mins 30 seconds or whatever, make your practice just like the exam, as the cliché goes, perfect practice makes perfect. Take a look at your exam score when it comes and spend more time on the sections that were weaker.

If you get nervous when entering/during the exam, it's probably a good idea to work on mental training just like athletes do. Now that you've done it once, you can envision the location, reading a scenario and the entering the room. Spending time visualizing success was crucial for me, additionally I spent time listening to podcasts on performing under pressure and developing a strong mindset. You will likely never feel 100% ready, but it's important to have faith in your abilities and don't doubt yourself. 

3. I spent about two months full time studying for the clinical, which was definitely overkill but I have no regrets. I was able to study without having to work part time or full time which made things easier but a fair amount of my classmates managed to work part time with no issues.

4. For the exam itself, patient safety is paramount. Know your precautions and contraindications, check in with the patient frequently, especially with any transitional movements. For example, if getting them up from lying, ask if they're dizzy/short of breath etc. Other than that, just do the skill the scenario asks, you should have done more than enough practice scenarios by this point, and the task itself should be the easy part. 

5. The exam itself is more about whether you can perform under pressure, versus your actual skills. That being said, make sure your skills are impeccable. 

If you've got any specific questions, feel free to ask. 

Tl;dr: Analyze your mistakes, fix your weaknesses and succeed. 

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13 hours ago, Conham said:

Lol get your head out of your bum.

You guys are really great but let's stay away from doing catch phrases and poky comments. The idea is to analyze why not so bright students pass and why some of the other hard working students fail in the PCE clinical part. Because for me failing was very hurtful but more than that, watching average group mates pass the same exam was like 100 needles in my body + humiliation

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  • 1 year later...

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