Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Recommended Posts

3 minutes ago, g-nocks said:

The biggest benefit to doing your fourth year is the AGPA calculation (assuming that will help you), so I think that alone would be enough reason to finish your fourth year

Just to add to this though, the AGPA calculation will not come into effect until you apply with your degree already completed (applying after your fourth year). 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like you did a lot for your ECs. The lower score may be due to how you wrote the ECs, rather than the content itself. Maybe reflect on your writing style and for next cycle, have others review it more/start early. 

As for co-op, I did it as a "back up plan", gave me an extra year to apply for medicine, but also gain job experience in the event I didn't get in to medicine. That was one of the smartest decisions I made since I'm still here, 3 years later, trying to get in. I'm currently working in the same institution I did my co-op in, since I have the experience and connections. But applying next cycle, you won't get to put any of your co-op experience on it since the deadline is June 1. You'd be planning for the cycle after if you want the experience/publications.

Also keep in mind, co-op doesn't guarantee you any publications. Often times, labs will hire co-op students to do basic scut work. I got 2 abstracts and 1 paper that never got past reviews but I did 16 months straight and that was 3 years ago. Those projects didn't continue on afterward. Many of the co-op students I work with don't have opportunities to do enough/significant work to get above 3rd author 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would pick up a unique hobby; your extra-curriculars are filled with things many other applicants are doing. Your GPA is around the average for those admitted, but your NAQ score reflects that they aren't evaluating you well. I would also have friends look over your application - make sure you are really showing yourself off. Don't lie, but think about what to highlight. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, chiynadoll said:

Seems like you did a lot for your ECs. The lower score may be due to how you wrote the ECs, rather than the content itself. Maybe reflect on your writing style and for next cycle, have others review it more/start early. 

As for co-op, I did it as a "back up plan", gave me an extra year to apply for medicine, but also gain job experience in the event I didn't get in to medicine. That was one of the smartest decisions I made since I'm still here, 3 years later, trying to get in. I'm currently working in the same institution I did my co-op in, since I have the experience and connections. But applying next cycle, you won't get to put any of your co-op experience on it since the deadline is June 1. You'd be planning for the cycle after if you want the experience/publications.

Also keep in mind, co-op doesn't guarantee you any publications. Often times, labs will hire co-op students to do basic scut work. I got 2 abstracts and 1 paper that never got past reviews but I did 16 months straight and that was 3 years ago. Those projects didn't continue on afterward. Many of the co-op students I work with don't have opportunities to do enough/significant work to get above 3rd author 

I definitely agree that writing style had something to do with it. But the low NAQ score has made me consider doing coop out of paranoia lol. I'm hoping to see a big jump in GPA in my 4th year as I have, for the most part, free reign over which elective courses I can take since all my requirements will be finished

Link to post
Share on other sites

From my experience, the NAQ can change quite drastically year over year depending on what is added, how it is written and the overall applicant pool. Personally, I've had my NAQ go up by over 10+ points without really adding anything new to my experiences (just modified descriptions and added more hours to several activities). I don't think you necessarily need to do a Co-op to increase your NAQ - if there's any long-term commitments that you are still involved in that you love, keep doing those things! That could very well increase your NAQ more than doing a Co-op. 

With that being said, getting into medicine is not a guaranteed thing and I would prepare and live your life as if you weren't applying for med school. If your co-op would provide a great job opportunity for when you graduate I would say that is just as valuable as potentially increasing your NAQ score with pubs. No matter how good your AQ or NAQ scores are, you just might have to apply several times to get in. It's just the way it is. It could be very beneficial to have a good job lined up straight after graduation because you did a co-op! 

Best of luck

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...