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M.D. with training in Ostheopathy (OMT)


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Physicians who completed their D.O. in the US and come to Canada after their residency can practice just like any M.D. (from what I understand). Even if I'll be studying allopathic medicine rather than ostheopathic medicine, I'm intrigued by the Ostheopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) taught at D.O. schools. I was wondering if it's possible to complete formal OMT training in the US as a Canadian M.D. student and obtain a US accreditation to use the techniques in Canada. Has anyone ever heard of some sort of exchange between D.O. and M.D. schools or OMT training tailored for M.D. students looking to broaden their clinical skills?

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1 hour ago, QueenStan said:

Sadly the AOA is doing its best to keep it alive. COMLEX is stupid on so many levels.

RE Why: OMT is extremely lucrative since it's privately administered.

Luckily the studies suggest most DO grads abandon OMT once their training is finished and just focus on the actual evidence based medicine, despite the monetary incentive.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't fully agree with your assessment @adhominem.   DO schools in the United States are generating more graduates than ever, and with that being the case I certainly don't think OMT is going anywhere anytime soon.  I also think you may be generalizing OMT a little bit too much.  There is some evidence to show it is as effective as medications, physiotherapy or exercise in relieving some types of back pain.  It certainly isn't a cure all, but it absolutely is a tool that shows some efficacy under specific circumstances and overwhelmingly low risk.

To the OP: Just do an internet search for OMT training for MDs, and you should find information about what avenues may be available towards you.

 

 I am not an expert either, so please feel free to enlighten me with some additional information.  To add more to the conversation about EBM (and this isn't meant to be pointed at anyone in particular, I don't want animosity towards anyone).

Evidence based medicine is a fantastic tool at providing information about the efficacy of therapies in certain populations, and it certainly should be the tool which helps guide decision making and policy, but don't be fooled into thinking that it doesn't have its own limitations.  The reality is there is a lot more nuance to individual patients, and personalized medicine is equally as important.  Science and art.  

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On 7/18/2019 at 3:49 PM, downinggr said:

I don't fully agree with your assessment @adhominem.   DO schools in the United States are generating more graduates than ever, and with that being the case I certainly don't think OMT is going anywhere anytime soon.  I also think you may be generalizing OMT a little bit too much.  There is some evidence to show it is as effective as medications, physiotherapy or exercise in relieving some types of back pain.  It certainly isn't a cure all, but it absolutely is a tool that shows some efficacy under specific circumstances and overwhelmingly low risk.

To the OP: Just do an internet search for OMT training for MDs, and you should find information about what avenues may be available towards you.

 

 I am not an expert either, so please feel free to enlighten me with some additional information.  To add more to the conversation about EBM (and this isn't meant to be pointed at anyone in particular, I don't want animosity towards anyone).

Evidence based medicine is a fantastic tool at providing information about the efficacy of therapies in certain populations, and it certainly should be the tool which helps guide decision making and policy, but don't be fooled into thinking that it doesn't have its own limitations.  The reality is there is a lot more nuance to individual patients, and personalized medicine is equally as important.  Science and art.  

Back pain sure. There's also DOs that claim they can feel CSF flow or can manipulate the cranial bones from their suture points.

A close comparison is if we taught Traditional Chinese Medicine alongside our current curricula. Sure there's probably some stuff that works to an extent, but there's a lot of bunk too.

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