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Best Undergrad major acceptable for Dalhousie


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Sorry guys,

I would like to know which the best undergraduate major which I can get competitive GPA. Its not about what the major I like as I had bachelor degree in Engineering and its GPA 2.95.

And please advice me to which school I can go in NS as I am going to reside there this year and I don't know much about the life there.

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This is a very hard question to answer, because everyone is different. There is no "one" undergrad that gives you the best GPA. If there were, then everyone would do that and applicants to medicine wouldn't be unique! 

Which kind of classes do you tend to do the best in? Why do you do the best in those classes? 

I would start there! Also make sure you have enough time for extra-curriculars.

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I completed majors in statistics and economics at UTSG. Did well in lots of stats and math courses (got 100% in several courses; my final year avg mark was 95%; my cumulative avg over 4 yrs was 92%). I think if you are good in math, it's much easier to score high marks in these courses. I also completed several life-sci courses (cell/molecular bio, physiology etc), but I was never able to obtain 100% in life-sci courses.

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On 7/26/2019 at 6:25 AM, MDCoach2010 said:

This is a very hard question to answer, because everyone is different. There is no "one" undergrad that gives you the best GPA. If there were, then everyone would do that and applicants to medicine wouldn't be unique! 

Which kind of classes do you tend to do the best in? Why do you do the best in those classes? 

I would start there! Also make sure you have enough time for extra-curriculars.

I know It is hard question, but I do not want to be again in hard undergrad once again after the Engineering. I would prefer to go to Sociology or Psychology but If you could suggest one school in Halifax to enroll in it will be so helpful.  

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On 7/26/2019 at 9:13 AM, hamham said:

I completed majors in statistics and economics at UTSG. Did well in lots of stats and math courses (got 100% in several courses; my final year avg mark was 95%; my cumulative avg over 4 yrs was 92%). I think if you are good in math, it's much easier to score high marks in these courses. I also completed several life-sci courses (cell/molecular bio, physiology etc), but I was never able to obtain 100% in life-sci courses.

It is good option also

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Like the person above stated, there is no best major for getting the most competitive GPA (even if you think there is, there isn't). If you would prefer sociology or psychology (which are great courses), then go for one of those. Challenge yourself, do something you want to do, and enjoy it. No one on this website can give you the answers you're seeking. It also seems like you haven't done much of your own searching, have you tried googling what programs are available at the different schools in NS? 

Have you reflected on why you found engineering hard? Or why you weren't able to obtain a 'competitive' GPA with the degree you already have? (Maybe you didn't realize you wanted to go to med school and it was too little too late, and that's fine!).You said you "do not want to be again in hard undergrad once again after the engineering", which suggests that you're not willing to put in the effort it takes to get into med school, let alone actually study medicine (which is very hard and just so happens to be classified as an undergrad degree). Your post comes across like you're expecting to go into an "easier" second undergrad, do really well, and then get accepted. You have a long road ahead of you, so be prepared to work! If you're not willing to work hard to get into med school, then you're not setting yourself up to succeed once you get in. I apologize if you're just learning English, but I'd suggest taking some English/grammar courses to improve your writing (it really impresses admission people when you know how to write properly). 

 

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1 hour ago, NotADoctor said:

Like the person above stated, there is no best major for getting the most competitive GPA (even if you think there is, there isn't). If you would prefer sociology or psychology (which are great courses), then go for one of those. Challenge yourself, do something you want to do, and enjoy it. No one on this website can give you the answers you're seeking. It also seems like you haven't done much of your own searching, have you tried googling what programs are available at the different schools in NS? 

Have you reflected on why you found engineering hard? Or why you weren't able to obtain a 'competitive' GPA with the degree you already have? (Maybe you didn't realize you wanted to go to med school and it was too little too late, and that's fine!).You said you "do not want to be again in hard undergrad once again after the engineering", which suggests that you're not willing to put in the effort it takes to get into med school, let alone actually study medicine (which is very hard and just so happens to be classified as an undergrad degree). Your post comes across like you're expecting to go into an "easier" second undergrad, do really well, and then get accepted. You have a long road ahead of you, so be prepared to work! If you're not willing to work hard to get into med school, then you're not setting yourself up to succeed once you get in. I apologize if you're just learning English, but I'd suggest taking some English/grammar courses to improve your writing (it really impresses admission people when you know how to write properly). 

 

the guy is being pragmatic. your advice is not particularly practical.

hard degrees include hard arts, engineering etc.

in my experience kinesiology is a bird degree that should get you a good gpa.

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1 minute ago, GrouchoMarx said:

the guy is being pragmatic. your advice is not particularly practical.

hard degrees include hard arts, engineering etc.

in my experience kinesiology is a bird degree that should get you a good gpa.

I have no doubt about them being pragmatic, which is fine. However, practically speaking, if someone is not wanting to work hard (which this person clearly is not wanting to do by suggesting they want an easy way to get grades) then it does not bode well for their success later on. It's important for them to learn how to study in a rigorous program and to be able to manage their time well (balance study with other aspects of life). Their prior undergrad experience (whatever the reasons were) makes it seem that there is room to grow as a student. If they do not possess those skills going into med school, then they are going to have a difficult time. Practically speaking, I would think it is more pragmatic to develop the skills needed to succeed at studying medicine and life as a physician (if that is one's desire) then to seek an easy way to a medical school acceptance. I think they would be doing themselves an injustice by doing so. 

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On 7/27/2019 at 4:08 PM, NotADoctor said:

I have no doubt about them being pragmatic, which is fine. However, practically speaking, if someone is not wanting to work hard (which this person clearly is not wanting to do by suggesting they want an easy way to get grades) then it does not bode well for their success later on. It's important for them to learn how to study in a rigorous program and to be able to manage their time well (balance study with other aspects of life). Their prior undergrad experience (whatever the reasons were) makes it seem that there is room to grow as a student. If they do not possess those skills going into med school, then they are going to have a difficult time. Practically speaking, I would think it is more pragmatic to develop the skills needed to succeed at studying medicine and life as a physician (if that is one's desire) then to seek an easy way to a medical school acceptance. I think they would be doing themselves an injustice by doing so. 

Youre thinking idealistically and are coming across as holier than thou. that kind of attitude will get you sunk so quick in life.

theres a big difference between working hard and working smart.

undergrad is  useless in medical school. its only purpose is to provide a gpa for applications.

with that in mind, the smart move would be to take the easiest program with the least time spent on labs and class.

you could spend your time working hard for that 4.0 in engineering, staying til six pm every day doing physics labs, or you could spend far less time in kinesiology for the same grade, while adding more holistic extracurricular bullshit to your application and studying for MCAT with all the free time you have. the latter is clearly the better option as it is a more efficient use of time.

 

in a just world, med app committees would account for degree difficulty but they do not. to them, hard engineering is the exact same as a communications degree.

the ideal of hard work begets success is nice to believe, but it is not so simple. efficient use of time is the key to success.

 

 

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1 hour ago, GrouchoMarx said:

Youre thinking idealistically and are coming across as holier than thou. that kind of attitude will get you sunk so quick in life.

theres a big difference between working hard and working smart.

undergrad is  useless in medical school. its only purpose is to provide a gpa for applications.

with that in mind, the smart move would be to take the easiest program with the least time spent on labs and class.

you could spend your time working hard for that 4.0 in engineering, staying til six pm every day doing physics labs, or you could spend far less time in kinesiology for the same grade, while adding more holistic extracurricular bullshit to your application and studying for MCAT with all the free time you have. the latter is clearly the better option as it is a more efficient use of time.

 

in a just world, med app committees would account for degree difficulty but they do not. to them, hard engineering is the exact same as a communications degree.

the ideal of hard work begets success is nice to believe, but it is not so simple. efficient use of time is the key to success.

 

 

Agree 100%. You are free to pursue a hard ug, but know that to achieve the same gpa, youd have to work 3-4x as hard as someone in something like mac health sci, and you would be no more prepared for med school than someone getting the same results with a fraction of the effort.

There is no nobility in needless sacrifice, not for premeds (or anyone really)

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