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hey there. I don’t have any valuable info for the CEGEP part as I came to Canada straight to the uni system. But regarding the last part of your post, don’t put all your eggs in one basket. It took me 2 Bachelors and 6+ years to even get an interview and get accepted to med school. Just do your best regarding your grades, get valuable work and life experience during the summers, get some volunteering experience preferably in a hospital to have a good grasp of what it entails to be working in such an environment.

I do not wish you to be rejected when you apply, but if it happens, lighten your heart with a close friend/family member, wipe your tears and apply the following year. Rejection makes you more stronger than you could ever imagine, trust me on that.

All the best

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Fellow Quebecer here, these are my two cents.

1. What do you think about this change?

The Casper has always been a bit controversial. I don’t think anyone truly believes that it is the perfect tool for considering applicants, but there has been data that suggests a strong correlation between Casper scores and performance during clerkship. I’ve never taken the Casper, but to me it is something that you must first study for and understand, no matter what those who think that life experience is the only studying needed say. 

In regards to Laval, I don’t know what to think. It was for a long time the only school that solely considered marks when giving out interviews. That is coming to an end. That being said, most people do fine on the Casper, and there’s always Sherbrooke if you don’t.

To prepare yourself I would definitely read the sample questions and answers provided on the test maker’s website. There’s a very particular format that you should try to follow, a little bit like the MEM’s. Know that, know the basic of conflict resolution, know the various ethical principles that will be in opposition.

In regards to getting in, your chances are significantly better as a Cegep student, provided you have a good enough R Score to get an interview. In past years roughly 700-800 get interviews for a bit over 400 spots. Just being slightly above average in both marks, tests and interview performance usually means you will be admitted somewhere. Around 2/3 get in. Getting in after university in Quebec is much more difficult. There are approximately the same number of spots, but many more people applying. The killer is that your GPA is converted to a CRU which can really mess up your chances depending on which program you choose. Basically a 3.9 GPA can lead to a very disappointing CRU. People obviously get in but there’s significantly more competition.

If you don’t get in after Cegep but have a good R Score, just don’t do very well on the interview, you may consider putting off university for a year and reapplying as a Cegep student.

Just be thankful you’re not in another province where you have to do hundreds of hour of volunteering  to check arbitrary boxes and show that you REALLY want it. No MCAT which is also nice. 

If it doesn’t work out in Canada, there’s always low tier osteopathic med schools in the us that practically take anyone.
 

 

 

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teka,

Refusal is not the end of the world, if you do not succeed at first, try, try again. In my case, my grades were so low in Cegep, I could not apply with any chance of success then, in any event, I was not mature enough. I went to undergrad, matured, worked hard, and got in direçtly from undergrad. For the MEMFI and CaSPER, see the link below. 
 

 

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2 hours ago, -JAG- said:

Fellow Quebecer here, these are my two cents.

1. What do you think about this change?

The Casper has always been a bit controversial. I don’t think anyone truly believes that it is the perfect tool for considering applicants, but there has been data that suggests a strong correlation between Casper scores and performance during clerkship. I’ve never taken the Casper, but to me it is something that you must first study for and understand, no matter what those who think that life experience is the only studying needed say. 

In regards to Laval, I don’t know what to think. It was for a long time the only school that solely considered marks when giving out interviews. That is coming to an end. That being said, most people do fine on the Casper, and there’s always Sherbrooke if you don’t.

To prepare yourself I would definitely read the sample questions and answers provided on the test maker’s website. There’s a very particular format that you should try to follow, a little bit like the MEM’s. Know that, know the basic of conflict resolution, know the various ethical principles that will be in opposition.

In regards to getting in, your chances are significantly better as a Cegep student, provided you have a good enough R Score to get an interview. In past years roughly 700-800 get interviews for a bit over 400 spots. Just being slightly above average in both marks, tests and interview performance usually means you will be admitted somewhere. Around 2/3 get in. Getting in after university in Quebec is much more difficult. There are approximately the same number of spots, but many more people applying. The killer is that your GPA is converted to a CRU which can really mess up your chances depending on which program you choose. Basically a 3.9 GPA can lead to a very disappointing CRU. People obviously get in but there’s significantly more competition.

If you don’t get in after Cegep but have a good R Score, just don’t do very well on the interview, you may consider putting off university for a year and reapplying as a Cegep student.

Just be thankful you’re not in another province where you have to do hundreds of hour of volunteering  to check arbitrary boxes and show that you REALLY want it. No MCAT which is also nice. 

If it doesn’t work out in Canada, there’s always low tier osteopathic med schools in the us that practically take anyone.
 

 

 

Hi! Thanks really for the details. You said if someone has a good R score but doesn't get accepted because of interviews of casper test, you can reapply for med next year?

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4 hours ago, teka said:

Hi! Thanks really for the details. You said if someone has a good R score but doesn't get accepted because of interviews of casper test, you can reapply for med next year?

This varies by university. I don’t know about McGill, but they’re usually the strictest about these things.

For the university of montreal, if you have less than 12 university level credits you are considered a cegep student for admission purposes. Afterwards you will have to finish your bachelors to be admired. Sherbrooke has a similar requirement, but you do not need to finish your bachelors. 
 

This means that if you mess up on your first try, it may not be in your interest to attend university.

For example, let’s say you have an r score of 36.xxx in Cegep. Very good but certainly manageable and realistic for motivated students. If you decide to go for a popular premed program, such as Udem sciences biologiques, it’s unlikely that you will exceed that even with a 4.3. It varies by year to year but a perfect gpa usually gives you something like 35-36.0 in that program.

if you’re rejected with your 36 from Cegep, it means that you bombed the interview. Learn from what you did wrong and try again. I personally would not complete more than the minimum number of university level credits, or any university whatsoever, if I had an R score from cegep above around 35.75. Below that is iffy, unless you’re confident you can kill the interview next year. The only flaw in this system is explaining to your friends that you’re not going to university with them next year because you’re trying to game the system.

 

 

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2 hours ago, -JAG- said:

This varies by university. I don’t know about McGill, but they’re usually the strictest about these things.

For the university of montreal, if you have less than 12 university level credits you are considered a cegep student for admission purposes. Afterwards you will have to finish your bachelors to be admired. Sherbrooke has a similar requirement, but you do not need to finish your bachelors. 
 

This means that if you mess up on your first try, it may not be in your interest to attend university.

For example, let’s say you have an r score of 36.xxx in Cegep. Very good but certainly manageable and realistic for motivated students. If you decide to go for a popular premed program, such as Udem sciences biologiques, it’s unlikely that you will exceed that even with a 4.3. It varies by year to year but a perfect gpa usually gives you something like 35-36.0 in that program.

if you’re rejected with your 36 from Cegep, it means that you bombed the interview. Learn from what you did wrong and try again. I personally would not complete more than the minimum number of university level credits, or any university whatsoever, if I had an R score from cegep above around 35.75. Below that is iffy, unless you’re confident you can kill the interview next year. The only flaw in this system is explaining to your friends that you’re not going to university with them next year because you’re trying to game the system.

 

 

Thanks a lot for the response!

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