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How common is it to match to plastic surgery with no publication?


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No public data for Canada.

USA on the other hand...

Plastic Surgery applicants in 2018 Match (Newer Match data is still being compiled AFAIK):

170 Allopathic applicants to Plastic Surgery. (apparently no Osteopathic Applicants/matches that year if you look in the DO Outcomes)

24 unmatched.

1 person matched with no publications at all. (1 person with 0 publications went unmatched)

2 people matched with 1 publication. (2 people with 1 publication went unmatched)

4 people matched with 2 publications. (0 people with  2 publications went unmatched)

6 people matched with 3 publications. (0 people with  3 publications went unmatched)

5 people matched with 4 publications. (0 people with  4 publications went unmatched)

128 (!) people matched with 5 or more publications. (21 people with  5 or more publications went unmatched)

Might be able to extrapolate to Canada, might not. Goes without saying, publications do factor into plastic surgery match. (Note: ALL of these applicants were involved in AT LEAST 1 research project. Not a single applicant was not involved in any research)

 Remember, there are other factors that contribute to success in the match, especially in the USA. (Step Scores, Away Rotations, Letters, some places in the USA still operate with Honour/Honours Pass/Fail)

Source: NRMP Charting Outcomes in the Match 2018.

 

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This question is a bit more broad but certainly applies to this thread: do your publications have to be within the specialty you are applying to?

Example: I am entering med school with four publications (three first author) in tissue mechanics topics, some of which are quite high impact for their fields. Does this have any benefit if I were to apply to plastics, optho, neurosurgery, ect, even if the papers are unrelated? Does the demonstration of success in research in a completely different field prior to med school mean anything when matching to residency? (I realize this is not a black and white answer so feel free to give examples/stories instead of trying to answer it directly).

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1 hour ago, Vertex said:

This question is a bit more broad but certainly applies to this thread: do your publications have to be within the specialty you are applying to?

Example: I am entering med school with four publications (three first author) in tissue mechanics topics, some of which are quite high impact for their fields. Does this have any benefit if I were to apply to plastics, optho, neurosurgery, ect, even if the papers are unrelated? Does the demonstration of success in research in a completely different field prior to med school mean anything when matching to residency? (I realize this is not a black and white answer so feel free to give examples/stories instead of trying to answer it directly).

tissue mechanics seems like it could be relevant to a lot of fields tbh. I don't know what it takes to match to anything but my guess is that if you can spin it in a relevant way why not? 3 first author pubs is pretty big :) Congrats!!

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On 5/28/2020 at 9:33 AM, Vertex said:

This question is a bit more broad but certainly applies to this thread: do your publications have to be within the specialty you are applying to?

Example: I am entering med school with four publications (three first author) in tissue mechanics topics, some of which are quite high impact for their fields. Does this have any benefit if I were to apply to plastics, optho, neurosurgery, ect, even if the papers are unrelated? Does the demonstration of success in research in a completely different field prior to med school mean anything when matching to residency? (I realize this is not a black and white answer so feel free to give examples/stories instead of trying to answer it directly).

Yeah it would definitely help, though nobody can estimate how much it would help, as it would likely vary based on individual school preferences. Many surgical fields are quite big on the engineering, especially biomedical engineering, right now. 

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