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Good morning

After the release of Ontario admissions yesterday, I'm sure a lot of you (myself included) are on the fence about what program to choose if you received multiple offers. Especially with the pandemic restrictions complicating things, a lot of us are looking for more program information to help make our decisions. 

While it's easy to start weighing the pro's and con's of each universities curriculum, tuition, catchment area, geographical location, commute, etc., its hard to get an idea of what the experience of each program is like. 

I'd love to invite current students to reply to this thread and share some of their experiences. Simply, where you attend and what program (PT/OT), something you love about the program (could be a professor, a teaching style, a research highlight, anything), and one thing you don't (i.e. commute, class size, difficult placements, whatever). 

Hopefully sharing some of these stories can help give us prospective students some more insight to help with our decision making. 

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Hello! Current Queen's PT student here! 

Things I love about Queen's PT - Kingston is stunning and campus is so close to the water, our class of 67 is super tight-knit (though I'm sure most programs are), and I'm not sure about other schools but I really like how our curriculum is laid out/the teaching style at Queen's. Our first semester is very MSK-based and then we have a placement earlier than most if not all of the other programs, which I found really consolidates your first semester learning before diving into CR/neuro/geriatrics/paeds. We also have a nice mixture of mostly lectures and labs, with some group/case-based learning which I personally enjoy (I wouldn't like much more group work than we have tbh)

Things that are meh about Queen's PT - We have a MASSIVE catchment area that honestly spans like 2.5 hours in most directions from Kingston, so you could very likely end up with a few placements out of Kingston. But that being said, many classmates have ended up in their hometowns which is great, while others have had to pay double rent during placement. 

Please do not hesitate to reach out via DM if you have any more questions!! 

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6 hours ago, PTplox said:

I would love to hear about Westerns program if anyone has insight! I'm currently deciding between Western and Queens and I'm finding it tough to decide. 

I'm in the Western vs Mcmaster boat. A couple people I've known from the Mcmaster PT program don't have overly positive things to say, but older (4-10 yrs) Mac PT alumni seem super competent, ethical, and compassionate and seem to all say any school will yield a good experience. 

I've only heard good things about the western program. Faculty is amazing, hybrid style lectures, strong ortho background. London area is not ideal for my personal preferences though if you're from the area I understand how it's perfect! Location is my biggest gripe,and having to be away from my support system during this state of things. 

If anyone can speak to each program, please feel free to share. 

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I’ve been speaking with a reference of mine (a practicing PT) about UoT vs Mac. 
 

He states that in his experience, Mac grads tend to struggle more in practice initially, but do really well a couple years out. He said they tend to do better adapting and thinking outside the box. 
 

UoT grads seem better prepared for clinical practice fresh out of school, but don’t often expand their knowledge quite as much as Mac grads do after a few years. 
 

He also mentioned he doesn’t think the PBL from Mac or the traditional style teaching at UoT would be difficult to adapt to an online platform, but for both programs, the clinical side will pose the challenge. 
 

Any current students have thoughts to add? 

 

 

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16 hours ago, RehabJunkie said:

Hello! Current Queen's PT student here! 

Things I love about Queen's PT - Kingston is stunning and campus is so close to the water, our class of 67 is super tight-knit (though I'm sure most programs are), and I'm not sure about other schools but I really like how our curriculum is laid out/the teaching style at Queen's. Our first semester is very MSK-based and then we have a placement earlier than most if not all of the other programs, which I found really consolidates your first semester learning before diving into CR/neuro/geriatrics/paeds. We also have a nice mixture of mostly lectures and labs, with some group/case-based learning which I personally enjoy (I wouldn't like much more group work than we have tbh)

Things that are meh about Queen's PT - We have a MASSIVE catchment area that honestly spans like 2.5 hours in most directions from Kingston, so you could very likely end up with a few placements out of Kingston. But that being said, many classmates have ended up in their hometowns which is great, while others have had to pay double rent during placement. 

Please do not hesitate to reach out via DM if you have any more questions!! 

Thank you! This is just the kind of insight we need! 

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23 hours ago, PTplox said:

I would love to hear about Westerns program if anyone has insight! I'm currently deciding between Western and Queens and I'm finding it tough to decide. 

I spoke to someone in Westerns PT program and he had really good things to say! He said its good mix of lectures and clinical labs with a stronger focus on ortho/msk than UofT. He said he originally wanted UofT or Mac but thought Western had the best program for him. Ive heard from 10+ people in the field now that UofT probably places the least emphasis on ortho/msk, as their grads are more prepared for CR/neuro after graduation. London will be cheaper to live in than Kingston (and obvs Toronto).

He also mentioned that the Western profs were really helpful during the transition online and devoted lots of their time to host small group zoom sessions and to meet with students for extra help. Western actually has a town hall tomorrow that will also be posted after that discusses their plan for the fall term. 

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57 minutes ago, Rehabgirl said:

I spoke to someone in Westerns PT program and he had really good things to say! He said its good mix of lectures and clinical labs with a stronger focus on ortho/msk than UofT. He said he originally wanted UofT or Mac but thought Western had the best program for him. Ive heard from 10+ people in the field now that UofT probably places the least emphasis on ortho/msk, as their grads are more prepared for CR/neuro after graduation. London will be cheaper to live in than Kingston (and obvs Toronto).

He also mentioned that the Western profs were really helpful during the transition online and devoted lots of their time to host small group zoom sessions and to meet with students for extra help. Western actually has a town hall tomorrow that will also be posted after that discusses their plan for the fall term. 

Thank you for replying!

I'm surprise that London would be cheaper because its population is much greater than Kingston, but I guess theres a lot of factors which can affect housing prices?

Also, thanks for letting us know about the town hall. It'll be nice to hear what they plan to do moving forward!

This is a general question to anyone who can answer, but is there a difference between the MPT from Western and Msc PT from Queens? Does one offer more opportunities post graduation like teaching positions? I just want to make sure I cover all my bases when making a decision between the schools.

 

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56 minutes ago, PTplox said:

Thank you for replying!

I'm surprise that London would be cheaper because its population is much greater than Kingston, but I guess theres a lot of factors which can affect housing prices?

Also, thanks for letting us know about the town hall. It'll be nice to hear what they plan to do moving forward!

This is a general question to anyone who can answer, but is there a difference between the MPT from Western and Msc PT from Queens? Does one offer more opportunities post graduation like teaching positions? I just want to make sure I cover all my bases when making a decision between the schools.

 

Nooo idea im sorry! Ive been told by PTs that all that matters is the piece of paper at the end regardless of where you go.

https://www.uwo.ca/coronavirus/presidents-updates/index.html 

I find their website as a whole pretty organized and easy to find info about housing and the program/courses etc.! The "student hub" page is super informative :) 

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U of T revamped the curriculum for class of 2021 and it was a learning curve. However, I truly love it. We have a mix of lectures and small group learning. In the labs when learning/practicing hands on skills they provide it via a case study in order to stimulate our learning and get us thinking. We have numerous clinicians from the community to come in and be TAs. This serves two great purposes 1) making connections and 2) give "real world" advice. But, what I really love at U of T is the exam testing. We are no longer required to memorize small, pointless facts (like stress-strain curve). We only have one exam per unit and it is a clinical exam. For example, a question could be: "You are seeing Mr. X, he complains of xyz and has xyz. What are your top 3 priorities when treating Mr. X" and you have about 6 options to choose from. The longer answer focuses on a case and preparing a treatment plan for a patient as well as creating short and long term goals for the patient. This type of testing is so much more useful than what other schools currently do. As far as I am aware Western PT still has like 5 courses with 5 different midterms and exams (very similar to undergrad). Additionally, at U of T we now have ACE days. Thus, for each unit we are given one day off to go shadow for 3 hours. The program sets you up at a site and you attend that site every Thursday for 3 hours. It was super beneficial to be able to apply what we were learning at our ACE days. This is also helps the fact that we get clinical exposure early even though our first placement isn't until June. I was in the hospital shadowing my 3rd week being in PT school which is awesome. 

How was U of T's response to COVID? I think it was great. We adapted an online curriculum quickly and we pushed ahead the content that we could learn (we were about to start neuro when schools shut down). We did all of the "theory" for neuro but when we couldn't get back to class they shifted another unit ahead that involved theory (Critical Thinking). We currently just started research as that can be done online. The plan is that once we come back we will do the lab portion of neuro and critical thinking. We have townhall meetings once a week for the program director to update us which has been great. She has said that no matter what, she wants to ensure that we get the same quality education as if we did not have COVID. This is a reason why we haven't switched to online labs. She doesn't want to compromise our learning experience. Thus, she is willing to extend the program and we won't be paying extra tuition. SSM (the program director) is such an amazing person. Everyone in our class loves her. 

 U of T is shifting to a PBL model as well. We still have lectures but we have small group sessions throughout the week to discuss a case and during the labs we are required to do the pre-work to review what we are doing. This was extremely frustrating at first because the faculty wouldn't just give us the answers. They would review how to do it after we all had a chance to try it and ask the TAs for help. However, that being said all PT schools in Canada do an amazing job of preparing you. As long as you're willing to put in the effort, you will be fine! Pick the school where you see yourself excelling the most (considering your own learning style, and the city). I picked U of T and I have 0 regrets. Living in Toronto is very expensive but there is always something to do. Such an amazing city to live in at this age and the amount of specialists in the area is amazing. Message me if you have anymore questions. 

To add, U of T does not place any less emphasis on MSK than the other units. We do MSK from middle/end of September to middle of December. Cardioresp from January to early March and then neuro from mid-march to end of May. Thus, you can see the units are evenly spread out. 

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2 hours ago, cubes868 said:

U of T revamped the curriculum for class of 2021 and it was a learning curve. However, I truly love it. We have a mix of lectures and small group learning. In the labs when learning/practicing hands on skills they provide it via a case study in order to stimulate our learning and get us thinking. We have numerous clinicians from the community to come in and be TAs. This serves two great purposes 1) making connections and 2) give "real world" advice. But, what I really love at U of T is the exam testing. We are no longer required to memorize small, pointless facts (like stress-strain curve). We only have one exam per unit and it is a clinical exam. For example, a question could be: "You are seeing Mr. X, he complains of xyz and has xyz. What are your top 3 priorities when treating Mr. X" and you have about 6 options to choose from. The longer answer focuses on a case and preparing a treatment plan for a patient as well as creating short and long term goals for the patient. This type of testing is so much more useful than what other schools currently do. As far as I am aware Western PT still has like 5 courses with 5 different midterms and exams (very similar to undergrad). Additionally, at U of T we now have ACE days. Thus, for each unit we are given one day off to go shadow for 3 hours. The program sets you up at a site and you attend that site every Thursday for 3 hours. It was super beneficial to be able to apply what we were learning at our ACE days. This is also helps the fact that we get clinical exposure early even though our first placement isn't until June. I was in the hospital shadowing my 3rd week being in PT school which is awesome. 

How was U of T's response to COVID? I think it was great. We adapted an online curriculum quickly and we pushed ahead the content that we could learn (we were about to start neuro when schools shut down). We did all of the "theory" for neuro but when we couldn't get back to class they shifted another unit ahead that involved theory (Critical Thinking). We currently just started research as that can be done online. The plan is that once we come back we will do the lab portion of neuro and critical thinking. We have townhall meetings once a week for the program director to update us which has been great. She has said that no matter what, she wants to ensure that we get the same quality education as if we did not have COVID. This is a reason why we haven't switched to online labs. She doesn't want to compromise our learning experience. Thus, she is willing to extend the program and we won't be paying extra tuition. SSM (the program director) is such an amazing person. Everyone in our class loves her. 

 U of T is shifting to a PBL model as well. We still have lectures but we have small group sessions throughout the week to discuss a case and during the labs we are required to do the pre-work to review what we are doing. This was extremely frustrating at first because the faculty wouldn't just give us the answers. They would review how to do it after we all had a chance to try it and ask the TAs for help. However, that being said all PT schools in Canada do an amazing job of preparing you. As long as you're willing to put in the effort, you will be fine! Pick the school where you see yourself excelling the most (considering your own learning style, and the city). I picked U of T and I have 0 regrets. Living in Toronto is very expensive but there is always something to do. Such an amazing city to live in at this age and the amount of specialists in the area is amazing. Message me if you have anymore questions. 

To add, U of T does not place any less emphasis on MSK than the other units. We do MSK from middle/end of September to middle of December. Cardioresp from January to early March and then neuro from mid-march to end of May. Thus, you can see the units are evenly spread out. 

WOW! Thank you SO much for your answer. This is a new kind of insight that no one else has really mentioned before and I appreciate it so much! 

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2 hours ago, cubes868 said:

U of T revamped the curriculum for class of 2021 and it was a learning curve. However, I truly love it. We have a mix of lectures and small group learning. In the labs when learning/practicing hands on skills they provide it via a case study in order to stimulate our learning and get us thinking. We have numerous clinicians from the community to come in and be TAs. This serves two great purposes 1) making connections and 2) give "real world" advice. But, what I really love at U of T is the exam testing. We are no longer required to memorize small, pointless facts (like stress-strain curve). We only have one exam per unit and it is a clinical exam. For example, a question could be: "You are seeing Mr. X, he complains of xyz and has xyz. What are your top 3 priorities when treating Mr. X" and you have about 6 options to choose from. The longer answer focuses on a case and preparing a treatment plan for a patient as well as creating short and long term goals for the patient. This type of testing is so much more useful than what other schools currently do. As far as I am aware Western PT still has like 5 courses with 5 different midterms and exams (very similar to undergrad). Additionally, at U of T we now have ACE days. Thus, for each unit we are given one day off to go shadow for 3 hours. The program sets you up at a site and you attend that site every Thursday for 3 hours. It was super beneficial to be able to apply what we were learning at our ACE days. This is also helps the fact that we get clinical exposure early even though our first placement isn't until June. I was in the hospital shadowing my 3rd week being in PT school which is awesome. 

How was U of T's response to COVID? I think it was great. We adapted an online curriculum quickly and we pushed ahead the content that we could learn (we were about to start neuro when schools shut down). We did all of the "theory" for neuro but when we couldn't get back to class they shifted another unit ahead that involved theory (Critical Thinking). We currently just started research as that can be done online. The plan is that once we come back we will do the lab portion of neuro and critical thinking. We have townhall meetings once a week for the program director to update us which has been great. She has said that no matter what, she wants to ensure that we get the same quality education as if we did not have COVID. This is a reason why we haven't switched to online labs. She doesn't want to compromise our learning experience. Thus, she is willing to extend the program and we won't be paying extra tuition. SSM (the program director) is such an amazing person. Everyone in our class loves her. 

 U of T is shifting to a PBL model as well. We still have lectures but we have small group sessions throughout the week to discuss a case and during the labs we are required to do the pre-work to review what we are doing. This was extremely frustrating at first because the faculty wouldn't just give us the answers. They would review how to do it after we all had a chance to try it and ask the TAs for help. However, that being said all PT schools in Canada do an amazing job of preparing you. As long as you're willing to put in the effort, you will be fine! Pick the school where you see yourself excelling the most (considering your own learning style, and the city). I picked U of T and I have 0 regrets. Living in Toronto is very expensive but there is always something to do. Such an amazing city to live in at this age and the amount of specialists in the area is amazing. Message me if you have anymore questions. 

To add, U of T does not place any less emphasis on MSK than the other units. We do MSK from middle/end of September to middle of December. Cardioresp from January to early March and then neuro from mid-march to end of May. Thus, you can see the units are evenly spread out. 

This is amazing - thanks so much! I was already pretty sure I'd be accepting U of T but this just confirms it even more. How would you say the social aspect is within U of T PT? Do you guys get together and do stuff, play intramurals, etc.? In my master's program right now, you're pretty isolated but I always wanted to be in a program that actually socializes and where there's a sense of community/family. Would you say you have this in PT at U of T? (pre-COVID of course)

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33 minutes ago, rehabchick said:

This is amazing - thanks so much! I was already pretty sure I'd be accepting U of T but this just confirms it even more. How would you say the social aspect is within U of T PT? Do you guys get together and do stuff, play intramurals, etc.? In my master's program right now, you're pretty isolated but I always wanted to be in a program that actually socializes and where there's a sense of community/family. Would you say you have this in PT at U of T? (pre-COVID of course)

Hey, I'm happy to hear that! The social aspect has exceeded my expectations. Each semester, the inter-mural advisor sends out a google survey. On that survey you just list the sports you're interested in and then the team captain will create a Facebook group for you to join. From a non-sports standing my friends and I will get together at least once a week. We have events throughout the year planned. For example, last year during O week we went to Jays game, had a games night, scavenger hunt, a day in park day (volleyball, spikeball, board games), and a boat cruise (which was definitely my favorite event). We also got a PT1/2 dinner scheduled so in first semester you'll be invited for dinner at a PT2's house and then the whole class (PT1 and PT2s go to a bar). Then in second semester the roles are switched (PT1s invite the PT2s for dinner). You will also have first year reps who coordinate activities throughout the year such as Christmas events, Halloween parties, St. Patty's pancakes, etc). We also had an activity challenge for the month of January where you were placed into groups and you were competing for which group was the most active. Overall, I think there are lot's of opportunities to have fun both from a student council perspective (events planned by them throughout the year) and through your own friends. The amount I study now is a lot less than undergrad so there is ample opportunity to get involved or just have fun with friends and classmates. 

 

Initially, I was worried about the social aspect given that U of T accepts individuals with such high GPA. However, our class is tight knit. We obviously have different friend groups like every program would have but we do a really awesome job of involving everyone. For example, different friend groups get together often for drinks, board games or movie nights. I'd say that happens often. Please feel free to ask anymore questions or message me! 

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10 minutes ago, cubes868 said:

Hey, I'm happy to hear that! The social aspect has exceeded my expectations. Each semester, the inter-mural advisor sends out a google survey. On that survey you just list the sports you're interested in and then the team captain will create a Facebook group for you to join. From a non-sports standing my friends and I will get together at least once a week. We have events throughout the year planned. For example, last year during O week we went to Jays game, had a games night, scavenger hunt, a day in park day (volleyball, spikeball, board games), and a boat cruise (which was definitely my favorite event). We also got a PT1/2 dinner scheduled so in first semester you'll be invited for dinner at a PT2's house and then the whole class (PT1 and PT2s go to a bar). Then in second semester the roles are switched (PT1s invite the PT2s for dinner). You will also have first year reps who coordinate activities throughout the year such as Christmas events, Halloween parties, St. Patty's pancakes, etc). We also had an activity challenge for the month of January where you were placed into groups and you were competing for which group was the most active. Overall, I think there are lot's of opportunities to have fun both from a student council perspective (events planned by them throughout the year) and through your own friends. The amount I study now is a lot less than undergrad so there is ample opportunity to get involved or just have fun with friends and classmates. 

 

Initially, I was worried about the social aspect given that U of T accepts individuals with such high GPA. However, our class is tight knit. We obviously have different friend groups like every program would have but we do a really awesome job of involving everyone. For example, different friend groups get together often for drinks, board games or movie nights. I'd say that happens often. Please feel free to ask anymore questions or message me! 

That sounds awesome!! Thanks so much for answering and I'll definitely reach out if I have more questions! :)

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3 hours ago, cubes868 said:

Hey, I'm happy to hear that! The social aspect has exceeded my expectations. Each semester, the inter-mural advisor sends out a google survey. On that survey you just list the sports you're interested in and then the team captain will create a Facebook group for you to join. From a non-sports standing my friends and I will get together at least once a week. We have events throughout the year planned. For example, last year during O week we went to Jays game, had a games night, scavenger hunt, a day in park day (volleyball, spikeball, board games), and a boat cruise (which was definitely my favorite event). We also got a PT1/2 dinner scheduled so in first semester you'll be invited for dinner at a PT2's house and then the whole class (PT1 and PT2s go to a bar). Then in second semester the roles are switched (PT1s invite the PT2s for dinner). You will also have first year reps who coordinate activities throughout the year such as Christmas events, Halloween parties, St. Patty's pancakes, etc). We also had an activity challenge for the month of January where you were placed into groups and you were competing for which group was the most active. Overall, I think there are lot's of opportunities to have fun both from a student council perspective (events planned by them throughout the year) and through your own friends. The amount I study now is a lot less than undergrad so there is ample opportunity to get involved or just have fun with friends and classmates. 

 

Initially, I was worried about the social aspect given that U of T accepts individuals with such high GPA. However, our class is tight knit. We obviously have different friend groups like every program would have but we do a really awesome job of involving everyone. For example, different friend groups get together often for drinks, board games or movie nights. I'd say that happens often. Please feel free to ask anymore questions or message me! 

Thank you for more awesome info!

From what I have heard from my friends in PT and others online, everyone says the corriculum is very packed and challenging, so I was surprised that you said you are studying A LOT less than in undergrad. How is that possible?

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Just now, rtorkii said:

Thank you for more awesome info!

From what I have heard from my friends in PT and others online, everyone says the corriculum is very packed and challenging, so I was surprised that you said you are studying A LOT less than in undergrad. How is that possible?

U of T emphasizes understanding material and applying it. In undergrad I would have to memorize small details like the entire Kreb cycle but our exams are not structured that way at all. They focus on having a good clinical understanding. I have heard that some PT schools in Ontario still focus on memorization of small details which is absolutely useless in my opinion cause you forget it after like 1 month of writing the final. For example, for our MSK final I studied individually a lot (typically sitting in library) and spent more hours studying (I was trying to study as I did in undergrad). However, for cardioresp I focused more on understanding the foundations then adding to it by discussing cases/problems with friends. The way I studied changed. I moved away from the standard studying alone in the library to studying with friends and discussing it out loud. My mark for cardioresp was higher for that very reason. I am way less stressed in PT school (at least at U of T) because the pass rate is 70 and they want you have a clinical understanding. When writing the exam it can be annoying know that there are multiple right answers but only a few "best" answers but I appreciate the program doing that because that's what real life is like. Our days are typically 9am to 3/4pm with only a lunch break. I would say sometimes I review (1-2 hours tops) after school but mainly focus on making dinner, playing intermurals or getting involved in extracurricular (clubs or interest groups). So yes the days/curriculum are packed but U of T definitely avoids giving us unnecessary stress by the way they test us. 

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1 hour ago, cubes868 said:

U of T emphasizes understanding material and applying it. In undergrad I would have to memorize small details like the entire Kreb cycle but our exams are not structured that way at all. They focus on having a good clinical understanding. I have heard that some PT schools in Ontario still focus on memorization of small details which is absolutely useless in my opinion cause you forget it after like 1 month of writing the final. For example, for our MSK final I studied individually a lot (typically sitting in library) and spent more hours studying (I was trying to study as I did in undergrad). However, for cardioresp I focused more on understanding the foundations then adding to it by discussing cases/problems with friends. The way I studied changed. I moved away from the standard studying alone in the library to studying with friends and discussing it out loud. My mark for cardioresp was higher for that very reason. I am way less stressed in PT school (at least at U of T) because the pass rate is 70 and they want you have a clinical understanding. When writing the exam it can be annoying know that there are multiple right answers but only a few "best" answers but I appreciate the program doing that because that's what real life is like. Our days are typically 9am to 3/4pm with only a lunch break. I would say sometimes I review (1-2 hours tops) after school but mainly focus on making dinner, playing intermurals or getting involved in extracurricular (clubs or interest groups). So yes the days/curriculum are packed but U of T definitely avoids giving us unnecessary stress by the way they test us. 

Wonderful elaboration. Thank you so much!

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On 6/3/2020 at 8:47 AM, GivinPTaShot said:

COuld you share one positive and one negative about the UWO program? 

Faculty is good and very knowledgeable.

 

I know the class size has increased quite a bit recently. So physical space may be an issue now and instructor to student ratio.  

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On 6/3/2020 at 1:41 PM, cubes868 said:

image.thumb.png.2b6457c1e1b4f0b53b01ce4b3ce0c3fa.pngHere is an example of our schedule from MSK. 

That seems like such a light schedule! Is this semester 1? I thought it would be heavier! As you progress through the program do the number of in class hours reduce??

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1 minute ago, AlliPT said:

That seems like such a light schedule! Is this semester 1? I thought it would be heavier! As you progress through the program do the number of in class hours reduce??

This is part of semester 1! So at U of T we have a month of introduction we're we talk about social issues, clinical framework, etc then at the end of September we start MSK which goes until the second week of December. This is fairly normal and how the schedule continues in cardioresp and neuro as well. Neuro we never got to experience as we were online for it. But, the same standard applies where we have classes from 9am to 3pm ish. Just a note the Tuesday schedule is Anatomy Dissection Lab from 9-11:30am then lunch until 1pm and then that lab would go from 1 pm to 3 pm with the option of staying from 3-4pm as some of the TAs would be around to clarify things/ask questions. 

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