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*CANADIAN FRIENDLY US DENTAL SCHOOLS*


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Hey guys! It's my second time being waitlisted at a canadian dental school (I'm on the top third this time but I haven't heard back yet) and I'm starting to think about applying to the states. I just have NO idea about any of the schools down there as well as which ones offer the BEST chances for canadians to be accepted there. I'm pretty clueless about the whole process when it comes to applying to the US. I want to apply to a maximum of 8 schools I think (as the application fees are expensive). I'm still debating about NYU as I think it would be incredibly expensive to live there compared to other states, which is why it's not included in my list. 

My canadian DAT scores are:

20 PAT, 20 BIO, 17 CHEM (I know, rough), 19 RC, 19 AA 

My GPA (according to my undergradute school where I earned my degree) over my ENTIRE degree is around 3.7. My GPA over my TWO best university years is around 4.0.

If any of you could revise my list and cut it down to 8 (or revise it based on my stats) that would be so appreciated. I have made a temporary list so far:

-Boston

-Case

-USC

-MWU

-MWU-IL

-NSU

-BFU

-UDM

-PITT

-UOP

-PENN

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US Dental schools are very expensive - are you sure you are able to handle the costs with family support? (You mention maximum of 8 schools for application due to expensive fees...well that is an extremely small drop in the bucket compared to 4 years of US dental school).

I've heard from undergrad colleagues that they went towards Australia for dental school, as it was cheaper and still well recognized in Canada.   

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I agree with @JohnGrisham that Australia is generally cheaper than the US based on tuition. But you also have to look at the big picture. In Australia the programs are 5 years. That means one more year of accruing interest without making an income. Going to a US dental school also allows you the opportunity to work in the US, which is close to home and has a much higher average income for general dentists and specialists even before converting back into the Canadian dollar. (The most reputable stats from each country's dental association I could find are these: the mean income for general dentists is $140,000 CAD in Canada according to the president of the CDA in 2014 and the mean income for general dentists is $190,000 USD ($254,000 CAD) according to the ADA in 2018). Additionally, Australians are not allowed to apply to many US residencies as well as some Canadian programs so this limits your potential very early. So definitely weigh what you're willing to do to maximize your loan repayment: specialize? Work in the US for at least a few years? take longer to have student debt? It all depends on your preferences. Australia and the US are both good options.

As for which schools you want to apply to in the US, you're in the right ballpark. Stick to schools that are private (public schools typically don't accept many if any international students), that accept the Canadian DAT (usually indicates they are serious about accepting Canadians) and do your best to research recent acceptance or matriculation statistics of Canadians at each school (lots of tables floating around different forums). Detroit Mercy, is consistently the second highest (25ish Canadians/year), and NYU being consistently the highest (35ish Canadians/year). While I understand your hesitation with NYU for cost issues, applying would be a great safety net if being accepted this cycle is important to you. It has a bad reputation for being expensive but I also see UOP on your list which has a higher tuition and is in San Francisco, another very expensive city.

Specifically about NYU, while it's very controversial for its bottom line price tag and large class size cultivating a competitive environment, it has its benefits too. It has unique opportunities like an Invisalign CE course covered by tuition (that normally costs $1000 post grad) and generally has much more access to advanced technology and their venders, recruiters, and general networking. This is simply because venders and recruiters get a lot of bang for their buck by visiting such a big school. It obviously wasn't my first choice, but had it been my only offer I would have definitely taken it.

There's a lot to consider, this is just what comes to mind for me.

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21 minutes ago, HopefulDDS said:

I agree with @JohnGrisham that Australia is generally cheaper than the US based on tuition. But you also have to look at the big picture. In Australia the programs are 5 years. That means one more year of accruing interest without making an income. Going to a US dental school also allows you the opportunity to work in the US, which is close to home and has a much higher average income for general dentists and specialists even before converting back into the Canadian dollar. (The most reputable stats from each country's dental association I could find are these: the mean income for general dentists is $140,000 CAD in Canada according to the president of the CDA in 2014 and the mean income for general dentists is $190,000 USD ($254,000 CAD) according to the ADA in 2018). Additionally, Australians are not allowed to apply to many US residencies as well as some Canadian programs so this limits your potential very early. So definitely weigh what you're willing to do to maximize your loan repayment: specialize? Work in the US for at least a few years? take longer to have student debt? It all depends on your preferences. Australia and the US are both good options.

As for which schools you want to apply to in the US, you're in the right ballpark. Stick to schools that are private (public schools typically don't accept many if any international students), that accept the Canadian DAT (usually indicates they are serious about accepting Canadians) and do your best to research recent acceptance or matriculation statistics of Canadians at each school (lots of tables floating around different forums). Detroit Mercy, is consistently the second highest (25ish Canadians/year), and NYU being consistently the highest (35ish Canadians/year). While I understand your hesitation with NYU for cost issues, applying would be a great safety net if being accepted this cycle is important to you. It has a bad reputation for being expensive but I also see UOP on your list which has a higher tuition and is in San Francisco, another very expensive city.

Specifically about NYU, while it's very controversial for its bottom line price tag and large class size cultivating a competitive environment, it has its benefits too. It has unique opportunities like an Invisalign CE course covered by tuition (that normally costs $1000 post grad) and generally has much more access to advanced technology and their venders, recruiters, and general networking. This is simply because venders and recruiters get a lot of bang for their buck by visiting such a big school. It obviously wasn't my first choice, but had it been my only offer I would have definitely taken it.

There's a lot to consider, this is just what comes to mind for me.

Ironically, a few of the smaller rural towns I've rotated through (medicine), were mostly US trained dentists and Australian, with a few older Canadian dentists usually owning the clinics. Rural dentistry in Canada still pays well in many areas and is a great way to work a few years(or stay forever if it fits your lifestyle), make a big dent in loans and get a lot of hands on experience, then move back to the city if thats what you desire.  These foreign trained dentists were all relatively new graduates (1-5years out of dental school) and were doing 300k+ after overhead(overhead being 35-50% to their dentist owner), while working relatively relaxed hours(and no commute!). Big part of that is the type of insurances (industry related jobs with good benefits, and Indigenous health benefits) they were able to bill, and being able to do more procedures and complex care (i.e. its either them ,or travelling 8 hours to a big city with an specialist dentist).

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15 minutes ago, JohnGrisham said:

Ironically, a few of the smaller rural towns I've rotated through (medicine), were mostly US trained dentists and Australian, with a few older Canadian dentists usually owning the clinics. Rural dentistry in Canada still pays well in many areas and is a great way to work a few years(or stay forever if it fits your lifestyle), make a big dent in loans and get a lot of hands on experience, then move back to the city if thats what you desire.  These foreign trained dentists were all relatively new graduates (1-5years out of dental school) and were doing 300k+ after overhead(overhead being 35-50% to their dentist owner), while working relatively relaxed hours(and no commute!). Big part of that is the type of insurances (industry related jobs with good benefits, and Indigenous health benefits) they were able to bill, and being able to do more procedures and complex care (i.e. its either them ,or travelling 8 hours to a big city with an specialist dentist).

Oh I don't doubt you can make big bucks in Canada. My only point was that on average dentists make significantly more in the US so having the US at your disposal is a significant pro. A similar rural vs city income dichotomy exists in the US except the whole scale is pushed higher relative to Canada, making city life less sacrificial compared to working in Canada's big cities. A lot of factors go into this a couple being saturation differences and less regulation in price guides. Again, whatever works for the individual. If you're willing to live and work wherever as long as that's where the money is you're going to be okay financially no matter where you go to school. If you have preferences then be informed by those preferences.

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Hello c5555. I'm in similar situation. My cDAT are very similar to yours! I'm also applying to American dental schools this year. (Taking American DAT in August) 

I've done my research as well on the "Canadian-friendly American schools". I agree with you these schools you've listed are more Canadian/International students friendly. 

I have more experience and extracurricular activities so I decided to apply to American schools. (I'm applying to Temple, Penn, Columbia, and Detroit mercy.) 

I don't know if finance is a consideration for you, but if I were in your shoes, I would not apply to BU, Pacific, NYU, MWU, and Buffalo mostly because of the cost. 

 

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@HopefulDDS Got it spot-on. If you're deciding between Australian schools or US schools, pick the US schools. It's slightly more expensive but getting a US dental license is a nightmare if you're graduating from a school outside the US. 

@c5555 I would add NOVA to that list. I would also recommend applying wisely.For example, UPENN is considered an Ivey league school and they will likely not consider you if you have a 17 in Chem. 

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9 hours ago, Viola said:

I am planning to apply this cycle. Do you happen to know the schools with the cheapest tuition?

Your best bet is to look up the schools and compare tuition. The really expensive ones have been mentioned already which narrows down the list. Good luck!

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10 hours ago, Viola said:

I am planning to apply this cycle. Do you happen to know the schools with the cheapest tuition?

Cheapest tuition and US schools don't go together in one sentence. It will be one hell of a ride to pay back these loan!

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10 hours ago, A_K.Daniel said:

Does anyone know what schools look at GPA and DAT scores more, rather than extracurriculars?

I think my GPA and DAT scores are competitive, but I am a little short on the extracurriculars

Extracurricular activities are part of the requirement to be competitive in US dental school as they tend to like well rounded individuals. You are better off applying to Canadian schools who value DAT and GPA over extracurriculars.

You can always apply and see what happens, good luck!

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It depends if you are willing to take on the debt of US dental schools or if you have a family member that will help you pay for it... You can always do a second bachelors and make sure to do well then so you are competitive in canadian dental schools. U of t takes your top 3 years and western takes your top 2 years. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/29/2020 at 8:40 PM, A_K.Daniel said:

I heard Boston is becoming less Canadian friendly. Can someone confirm this? 

I heard all of the american schools are becoming less Canadian friendly with each passing year.

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