Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Recommended Posts

I will be quitting my current career very soon in anticipation of starting med school this September. Now, I’ve been somewhat anxious about breaking the news to my employer (and colleagues)... they are not aware that I have been applying and have 0 clue that I was planning on leaving. I work in a niche field, tight night company, and was next in line for a promotion. I guess my question is - how can I soften the blow? 


Before anyone comments saying that it’s wtvvv, I’m close to everyone I work with, and they’ve all invested a lot of time, effort, and cash in training/developing me. *I guess I just want them to understand that getting into med was a crapshoot*,  and by extension, I had to be strategic in building my backup career?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Been there, done that - it isn't easy. Particularly with the expense of training. 

I am not sure there is a good way - you can explain the situation, and for their sake give lots of notice. I ended up still working for them for a few months to help with any transitions etc. I had two groups I was working with that both were shocked by my departure. 

One of the weird things about getting into medical school seems to be all the breaks you have to with various organizations. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Be honest, and respectful, and if you wish provide some transitionary time to help them through any change-over issues. But do what is best for you.  Sounds like a great company, one that I would expect to be understanding - even if it might come from far left field!  I worked significantly for the months prior to medicine and moderately in the first few months to wrap things up. But wouldn't recommend the later, unless you absolutely have to (i.e. your boss is your best friend outside of work too etc etc).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hired by a company in the summer before starting medical school.  I only found about my acceptance after going through training.  Although it was a big company, I realized I’d leave my trainers/supervisors in a tight spot, whom I’d appreciated, if I didn’t work.  So I kept my commitment, even if it meant sometimes long days.  Based on my knowledge at the time, I think it was the right decision.

I think many at your company will be happy for you as the company does sound understanding.  I wouldn’t mention it was “back up” career but maybe discuss some of your reasons/interest in medicine as needed.  And it’s important to give notice as soon as possible to help them with the transition.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are right - not a great idea to say it was a back up career. I will think of a better way to articulate my ideas before talking to my supervisor.


Yes, I am planning on letting them know very soon, which would give them a pretty decent notice. I do plan on discussing with management how long they would need me for, and am happy to accommodate whatever they need (as long as it doesn’t go into September). Thanks for your input.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have done it. I think what your last comment says is good. You try and help with the transition, I gave a 3 weeks instead of a typical 2 week notice to help finish up a bunch of work/project I was working on. End of the day, employees come and go, to expect you'll stay forever is on them. I too was next in line for Full time and then bam med school. Just be humble, thank them for everything during your time there, and if there is any way you can help make your exit easier on them, that you would be happy to help. Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think out of consideration to your employer, you want to give them Notice ASAP. There is absolutely no downside to you other than perhaps an awkward moment. I would simply tell them it was “a long shot” application as you did not want to live with any regrets and as it turned out, you won the lottery, but realize you are putting them in a difficult position. Tell them you will accommodate them in any way possible. I would have this conversation later in the week. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to do the same. If you’re so tight with your company, then best to be transparent as early as possible. Tell them now so they can have more time to prepare for your departure and you can help train the next person in your role. Tell them how grateful you are to have worked with them and be thankful for all the time they spent on you. I’m my experience, (I’ve left more than one major career), people are usually supportive and happy for you. They will be sad to see you go, but that doesn’t mean you can’t stay friends.

best of luck on your new journey.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To me, working is problematic and unnecessary regardless of your financial situation. Firstly, in my case at least, I found med school challenging and I was literally always studying. I had no time for my ECs that I enjoyed, working was out of the question. Moreover, earning money would have been a zero sum gain, even in summer. This is because my bursary would have been reduced by the amount of my earnings, so even if I had the time, there was really no point working during school or in summer.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Bambi said:

To me, working is problematic and unnecessary regardless of your financial situation. Firstly, in my case at least, I found med school challenging and I was literally always studying. I had no time for my ECs that I enjoyed, working was out of the question. Moreover, earning money would have been a zero sum gain, even in summer. This is because my bursary would have been reduced by the amount of my earnings, so even if I had the time, there was really no point working during school or in summer.

Thanks for your input. I really do not have a clue how much studying is involved.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Unless your part-time job doubles as legitimate leisure, or you can effectively study during much of the time you're doing it, working during medical school would seem unwise. You still need to succeed in your classes. Not everyone does. You still need to get into the residency program that works for you. Not everyone does that, either. After all, if your part-time job isn't going to help you do either of those things, what is it going to help you to do? Avoid a little extra debt, perhaps? Is that really the priority right now?

Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, ER_Mike said:

Unless your part-time job doubles as legitimate leisure, or you can effectively study during much of the time you're doing it, working during medical school would seem unwise. You still need to succeed in your classes. Not everyone does. You still need to get into the residency program that works for you. Not everyone does that, either. After all, if your part-time job isn't going to help you do either of those things, what is it going to help you to do? Avoid a little extra debt, perhaps? Is that really the priority right now?

Say I loved my part time job, do you have a ball park of how many hours a week I could commit to putting into it while in first year med school? or would it be to variable to guess.

Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, ER_Mike said:

Unless your part-time job doubles as legitimate leisure, or you can effectively study during much of the time you're doing it, working during medical school would seem unwise. You still need to succeed in your classes. Not everyone does. You still need to get into the residency program that works for you. Not everyone does that, either. After all, if your part-time job isn't going to help you do either of those things, what is it going to help you to do? Avoid a little extra debt, perhaps? Is that really the priority right now?

Thanks for your input. After getting in touch with med students outside of this forum, I opted against working part time.

I do like my current job but it most certainly does not qualify as leisure!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...