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14 minutes ago, vmed88 said:

Anxious to be making the move from Ontario to Vancouver for only a few days of in person learning... it's going to be super isolating moving away from family and friends to sit in my room and learn online. If anyone OOP (or local!) is feeling the same, feel free to message me. We can plan some in-person social activities (following health guidelines of course) :)

On the same boat as you! Definitely anxious as well.   

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17 minutes ago, vmed88 said:

Anxious to be making the move from Ontario to Vancouver for only a few days of in person learning... it's going to be super isolating moving away from family and friends to sit in my room and learn online. If anyone OOP (or local!) is feeling the same, feel free to message me. We can plan some in-person social activities (following health guidelines of course) :)

Since I'm further along in the program I would highly recommend contacting student affairs now and before you get to Vancouver to let them know how you feel. It's completely confidential and I think it's important to let them know your guys' thoughts on this announcement. You'll learn as you go through med that you definitely have a say in some things regarding your curriculum so don't be intimidated reaching out to faculty. It's possible they have not fully taken into consideration the impact the decision will have on some students.

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26 minutes ago, vmed88 said:

Anxious to be making the move from Ontario to Vancouver for only a few days of in person learning... it's going to be super isolating moving away from family and friends to sit in my room and learn online. If anyone OOP (or local!) is feeling the same, feel free to message me. We can plan some in-person social activities (following health guidelines of course) :)

I think this is a big part of the faculty’s goal in having students move to their sites despite the online curriculum - that you’ll be able to start to build some community outside of the curricular activities as things loosen up. And be able to get to know your new city a bit better. If things go well, more will be able to happen in person - the problem is they don’t know when that will be, so it’s impossible to really plan for. It’s definitely a tough situation for you guys to be in, no good answers.  But I’m sure you guys will find some ways to make it work! And the orientations team is really working their butts off to find ways to support the community building.

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1 hour ago, Bruhmoment said:

Since I'm further along in the program I would highly recommend contacting student affairs now and before you get to Vancouver to let them know how you feel. It's completely confidential and I think it's important to let them know your guys' thoughts on this announcement. You'll learn as you go through med that you definitely have a say in some things regarding your curriculum so don't be intimidated reaching out to faculty. It's possible they have not fully taken into consideration the impact the decision will have on some students.

I’m going to reach out to student affairs as I’m in a situation where I will be moving to my site, and I’m nervous to leave behind my support system and connections to be in my room all day. I hope in the least student affairs can offer me some support through this. I definitely encourage other people to do this too if they are in a similar situation! Maybe if more people reach out they will get a better understanding of how this affects us :) 

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8 hours ago, hvem said:

A sizable number of our classmates actually stayed at home - in Surrey, one of our classmates commuted from white rock, Richmond, Burnaby. Even prior to covid-19, many people didn't go to in-person class the majority of the week. I personally only went to class in person for 1 full  day (CBL and clin skills) and Friday only for CBL which is 2 hours max. One of my classmates only went to ONE lecture the entire year, aside from CBL & clin skills and he does very well on exams. Both of us were partnered at family practice and have gotten feedback that we both really knew our stuff. Most of our friends never went to classes, never went to labs. 

TBH we were overjoyed when CBL moved online because now we didn't need to drive all the way to school just for 2 hours of CBL 2-3 a week. 

Many people actually skipped anatomy labs and histology labs, because they were useless learning experiences tbh -- cadaver dissection sounded glamorous to me as a premed. The reality sucks because you have 5 people crowding around a small space, we can never find the structures we're supposed to find, and you're just faking your way through the lab. Every lab my group mutters that we didn't see anything and now we'll have spend the same amount of time googling what these structures looks like ---- which why we all stopped going. 

In summary, you're missing out on nothing substantial with classes moving online. You are actually BLESSED. Having everything online will save SO much commute time which help you get better work-life balance. - saved 2 hours of commute/parking every day = time to workout, spend with your girlfriend, work on extracurriculars, get glorious sleep, etc

Also: many of my friends were super happy that flex got cancelled lol. Lot of us don't like FLEX

I laughed reading this, realizing that I do everything listed too and that we sound so jaded to first years. Let the 2024s have their fun for the first few months haha. Would your classmate happen to have the initials E.Z? That's one person I know who does well while going to no lectures, cramming 4 days prior to exams and watching at double speed

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14 hours ago, hvem said:

A sizable number of our classmates actually stayed at home - in Surrey, one of our classmates commuted from white rock, Richmond, Burnaby. Even prior to covid-19, many people didn't go to in-person class the majority of the week. I personally only went to class in person for 1 full  day (CBL and clin skills) and Friday only for CBL which is 2 hours max. One of my classmates only went to ONE lecture the entire year, aside from CBL & clin skills and he does very well on exams. Both of us were partnered at family practice and have gotten feedback that we both really knew our stuff. Most of our friends never went to classes, never went to labs. 

TBH we were overjoyed when CBL moved online because now we didn't need to drive all the way to school just for 2 hours of CBL 2-3 a week. 

Many people actually skipped anatomy labs and histology labs, because they were useless learning experiences tbh -- cadaver dissection sounded glamorous to me as a premed. The reality sucks because you have 5 people crowding around a small space, we can never find the structures we're supposed to find, and you're just faking your way through the lab. Every lab my group mutters that we didn't see anything and now we'll have spend the same amount of time googling what these structures looks like ---- which why we all stopped going. 

In summary, you're missing out on nothing substantial with classes moving online. You are actually BLESSED. Having everything online will save SO much commute time which help you get better work-life balance. - saved 2 hours of commute/parking every day = time to workout, spend with your girlfriend, work on extracurriculars, get glorious sleep, etc

Also: many of my friends were super happy that flex got cancelled lol. Lot of us don't like FLEX

Sort of off topic here and don't want to derail this thread (feel free to PM, IF you even have the time to reply haha). 

But any advice on being efficient when it comes to skipping lecture? I just finished first year and loved it, but definitely wasn't very efficient. I attended most non-fos lectures/activities but because I wasn't always retaining much I found I had to spend quite a bit of time at home studying. 

When you skip lecture, do you go along day by day trying to follow what would have been covered in class? Or do you like cram the week's content in one day, or just don't watch anything at all until closer to exams etc etc. What speed do you play your lectures at? 

Thanks aha

 

 

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9 hours ago, struggling2getin said:

I laughed reading this, realizing that I do everything listed too and that we sound so jaded to first years. Let the 2024s have their fun for the first few months haha. Would your classmate happen to have the initials E.Z? That's one person I know who does well while going to no lectures, cramming 4 days prior to exams and watching at double speed

To the 2024s that are super excited, I didn't mean to diminish your disappointment on missing out on these. Sorry if it comes off that way. I was hoping to be comforting but my jadedness leaked in....

@struggling2getin I know exactly who you're talking about who is an incredibly intelligent, fun guy. But there's a lot of people who do the same as this person haha. 

4 hours ago, pyridoxal-phosphate said:

Sort of off topic here and don't want to derail this thread (feel free to PM, IF you even have the time to reply haha). 

But any advice on being efficient when it comes to skipping lecture? I just finished first year and loved it, but definitely wasn't very efficient. I attended most non-fos lectures/activities but because I wasn't always retaining much I found I had to spend quite a bit of time at home studying. 

When you skip lecture, do you go along day by day trying to follow what would have been covered in class? Or do you like cram the week's content in one day, or just don't watch anything at all until closer to exams etc etc. What speed do you play your lectures at? 

Thanks aha

 

 

I feel you. I found in-person lectures harder than watching at my own pace. But for other incoming med students, just fyi that skipping lecture isn't for everyone. The group of my friends always went to every lectures so it depends on your learning style. 

2x Speed. (Some of the FoS lectures/really slow lectures were 3-4x).3-4 lectures a semester were so dense they were 1.4 x. 

If I'm on top of my stuff (which is the ideal), I think it's great to watch the week's lectures ahead on the weekend (over 2-3 days. I think if you cram it all into one day, you'll be too mentally fatigued to retain anything). But the reality is that doesn't happen all the time but 99% it's usually being a day of lectures ahead of the in-person lectures, because it feels bad to be behind the in-person lectures. 

You do need to watch the lectures though, rather than wait before the exams. 

The classmate struggling2getin talks about doesn't watch the lectures but he prepared very diligently for CBL. He's still studying. 

 

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Oof so I'm heavily debating if this is okay or not to say, but I think you guys need to know the reality. 

But Student Affairs isn't that helpful tbh for your personal struggles, just from my experience and my friends' experience. Over the course of med, people I know have lost non-med classmate people in their personal lives ranging from taking their own lives to illness, struggled with mental health, ..this list can get really long.... But it was like a pat on the back, generic advice (things will get better), you should read this book, and that's literally it. No one ever checks in or follows up on you. And yes, those of us that wanted actual help were disappointed.

I don't think Student Affairs can help much (Total forgiveness, what could they possibly do. They're not counsellors. They can't bring back people to life.) because their main job isn't to help students with personal issues. They have a zillion other responsibilities to do.

Jaded but I'm not exaggerating when I say you could having a rough time and all you get is a book recommendation.... 

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Wow, these posts are brutal. For others reading just remember that these views are not necessarily representative, especially as each site has their own staff/teachers etc.

My experience: Our lab instructors were amazing and I wouldn't have learned nearly as much without attending, and student affairs has been fantastic when I needed them. I was never brushed off or simply given a book recommendation, and follow up occurred on multiple occasions. 

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39 minutes ago, hvem said:

Oof so I'm heavily debating if this is okay or not to say, but I think you guys need to know the reality. 

But Student Affairs isn't that helpful tbh for your personal struggles, just from my experience and my friends' experience. Over the course of med, people I know have lost non-med classmate people in their personal lives ranging from taking their own lives to illness, struggled with mental health, ..this list can get really long.... But it was like a pat on the back, generic advice (things will get better), you should read this book, and that's literally it. No one ever checks in or follows up on you. And yes, those of us that wanted actual help were disappointed.

I don't think Student Affairs can help much (Total forgiveness, what could they possibly do. They're not counsellors. They can't bring back people to life.) because their main job isn't to help students with personal issues. They have a zillion other responsibilities to do.

Jaded but I'm not exaggerating when I say you could having a rough time and all you get is a book recommendation.... 

I'm sorry you had this experience:( I know of some people that didn't necessarily have the outcome they wanted with student affairs but I just want to say that for me that wasn't the case. They really went above and beyond to accommodate me. I'm not at vfmp so perhaps it's more of a site dependent thing but student affairs definitely checks up on us. We pretty much run into them in the hallway every day. I would still recommend reaching out !

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2 hours ago, Bruhmoment said:

I'm sorry you had this experience:( I know of some people that didn't necessarily have the outcome they wanted with student affairs but I just want to say that for me that wasn't the case. They really went above and beyond to accommodate me. I'm not at vfmp so perhaps it's more of a site dependent thing but student affairs definitely checks up on us. We pretty much run into them in the hallway every day. I would still recommend reaching out !

Take @Bruhmoment 's wise words!

This is true. I've heard from friends at IMP, SMP, and NMP that for example, in anatomy lab, the TAs and the instructors will personally come explain structures, set up extra anatomy review sessions, mock OSCEs, there's a CBT group for anxiety/depression/etc at IMP. 

Whereas at VFMP, your group is on your own figuring out anatomy (there are TAs but you have to fight for the attention of a TA and you get them for 2 minutes before they get pulled away by another group). There was no mock OSCE unlike at the sites. etc. 

VFMP - I'm sure the staff would love to be as accomodating and supportive as they are at the sites. Maybe when staff get so overwhelmed and overworked that there's just isn't time/energy left. (192 VFMP students vs. 32 IMP students so 6 times more students). 

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I'm also OOP coming from across Canada to be in the program. A little late but I was also very crushed when I got that email on Wednesday... I already secured an apartment near my site and was expecting the hybrid model that UBC had been talking about. Like others have said, the thought of moving to a new province without a social network (friends, family, work) to be isolated in my room for months is not what I pictured when I finally started medical school... but we can't complain because we still will be working towards our medical degrees. Anyone else moving OOP and feeling this way, please reach out. Good luck everyone <3 

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4 hours ago, MedTalks said:

I'm also OOP coming from across Canada to be in the program. A little late but I was also very crushed when I got that email on Wednesday... I already secured an apartment near my site and was expecting the hybrid model that UBC had been talking about. Like others have said, the thought of moving to a new province without a social network (friends, family, work) to be isolated in my room for months is not what I pictured when I finally started medical school... but we can't complain because we still will be working towards our medical degrees. Anyone else moving OOP and feeling this way, please reach out. Good luck everyone <3 

Are you SMP? let’s hang out so can be not so lonely!

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On 7/8/2020 at 8:44 AM, MedTalks said:

Yes, SMP! Sounds perfect, haha. On a more positive note, we can still enjoy Kelowna and hangout in small groups regardless of everything being online :)

 

On 7/6/2020 at 7:42 PM, Jambon said:

Are you SMP? let’s hang out so can be not so lonely!

I'm SMP too! We will make sure that we can all do some things together and don't get lonely! 

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20 hours ago, yeet9876 said:

Thank you @Bruhmoment!!!! This definitely changes things. Does anyone have access to entrada?

I think we'll all get access in August, but for now, it's only for those who work in the Faculty of Medicine I think.

However, we did get this exact same document in the form of an e-mail today!

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/3/2020 at 12:58 PM, Synth1 said:

Wow, these posts are brutal. For others reading just remember that these views are not necessarily representative, especially as each site has their own staff/teachers etc.

My experience: Our lab instructors were amazing and I wouldn't have learned nearly as much without attending, and student affairs has been fantastic when I needed them. I was never brushed off or simply given a book recommendation, and follow up occurred on multiple occasions. 

agreed, I know that almost every person I talked to was not happy with online cbl compared to in person - yes it's easier to slack off and not do much but really, cbl is an excellent time to actually try to learn something and apply it properly with immediate feedback from your team and tutor. Plus cbl was a key way to meet people in the class that you probably wouldn't have had a chance to meet another time. For those saying anatomy wasn't useful because of the volume of people: if you find 5 people standing around a cadaver with free reign to explore a hard place to learn, get ready for 5+ people standing around an OR table trying to see the anatomy on a live subject with procedures going on because I can promise you it's no easier, especially when you're the MSI3 up against residents and fellows who also want a look. I'd also say that while people talk a lot about flex, most of the people in my class are working on very interesting projects they would have never had access to without dedicated time, not just research but community building, education, health promotion, etc. Flex and basically the entire med curriculum is going to be as good or terrible as you make it, and if you're deadset on not showing up and just getting through then you're probably going to come out a bit jaded. 

All this to say, I hope the 2024's are excited for whatever the upcoming year will end up looking like. I'm sure it's going to be great at times but potentially isolating and crappy at other times. If all else fails, just remember that you never have to take the mcat again and hopefully it will make you feel a little better :)

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im in the MPT program at ubc, and we're hybrid. labs and clinical skills in person(3-4 times per week), and lectures online. They're trying to get approval for an in person cadaver lab as well. might make a difference that the incoming class is only 80 people in vancouver

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Anyone else disappointed UBC Med decided to make everything online while other departments have at least attempted to keep labs in person? The dentistry program will still hold labs in person. UBC Engineering still has some labs in person. As maybePT mentioned, the MPT program is going have labs and clinical skills in person. I wish they offered a more detailed explanation during the townhall meeting. 

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2 hours ago, financialstatus said:

Anyone else disappointed UBC Med decided to make everything online while other departments have at least attempted to keep labs in person? The dentistry program will still hold labs in person. UBC Engineering still has some labs in person. As maybePT mentioned, the MPT program is going have labs and clinical skills in person. I wish they offered a more detailed explanation during the townhall meeting. 

I share your sentiments completely and it honestly is a drag to be starting first year medicine in front of a computer screen. That being said, physicians are probably the most essential healthcare professional. Dentists and physiotherapists mostly stopped working during the height of the COVID pandemic and physicians don't have that option. I think they emphasised how burnt out a lot of our physician teachers are as a result of the pandemic. I think us having online classes minimises risk to both those physicians and their patients. Considering that most of us will have many years of medical training ahead of us, it likely does not make a significant difference whether we have our preclerkship years online or not in terms of educational outcomes. It's really sad to be missing out on the social aspects of medical school though for sure.

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