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On 7/24/2020 at 7:39 PM, sportyrichmeia said:

good grief - of all the things a research team could study in all the world to improve the treatment and care of patients this is the topic they decide to cover? Then they actually trolled hundreds of doctors to look at their social media accounts and graded them on various behaviours....... The morality police are out in full force - this crap shouldn't have even be published. 

also from a purely experimental design point of view isn't this study horrible? I mean only 1/2 of the vascular residents were actually found - so what you really saying is of the residents that even care to be open on socially media this is what they are doing. Good reason to think that group is different than the group they couldn't find so you cannot really extend the findings. Plus they don't even make any conclusion - they restate the findings, and say beware that things are  online. Ok we knew that prior to the paper even saying anything - so what was the actual science done? 

" It has been demonstrated that publicly available social media content may affect patient choice of physician, hospital, and medical facility" 

in what way? How - positive or negative? How does that impact patient outcome (and yes that is the primary thing I care about)? A lot of vague statements there - may impact, could play a role in future hiring blah blah. 

Edited by rmorelan
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S.H. was a 33-year-old male vascular fellow who performed searches on Facebook and Instagram. T.C. was a 28-year-old male research coordinator and medical school applicant who searched Facebook and Twitter. S.R. was a 37-year-old male medical student who searched Twitter and Instagram

lol

Quote

Controversial social comments were largely limited to comments centered around specific stances on abortion and gun control

Any guesses as to which stances were labelled "unprofessional"?

I wouldn't be surprised to see a retraction on this article tbh. What's interesting is that apparently it was based on two other articles that did something similar, one in urology and another in general surgery. Hopefully those get some backlash as well.

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18 minutes ago, Redpill said:

lol

Any guesses as to which stances were labelled "unprofessional"?

I wouldn't be surprised to see a retraction on this article tbh. What's interesting is that apparently it was based on two other articles that did something similar, one in urology and another in general surgery. Hopefully those get some backlash as well.

From my understanding, some of the 'unprofessional' acts were: 1. wearing a swimsuit (hence the trend #MedBikini) 2. drinking alcohol 3. provocative Halloween costumes

I think I saw somewhere that the article is being retracted

One of the authors of the paper also posted an apology on Twitter but I can't find it 

Edit: Found one of the apologies: 

Another author wrote the exact same thing as an apology on Twitter

Edit 2: Here is the other tweet

(Both are threads)

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22 hours ago, sportyrichmd said:

From my understanding, some of the 'unprofessional' acts were: 1. wearing a swimsuit (hence the trend #MedBikini) 2. drinking alcohol 3. provocative Halloween costumes

I think I saw somewhere that the article is being retracted

One of the authors of the paper also posted an apology on Twitter but I can't find it 

Edit: Found one of the apologies: 

Another author wrote the exact same thing as an apology on Twitter

I mean that is a bit of a tone deaf apology though - I mean being aware of what is there isn't the issue. It is that it doesn't matter, at least for a lot of the behaviours they mention, what was posted at all. If they want to apologize they should start with saying something along those lines - what is posted implies they didn't learn anything. Wearing a swimsuit, drinking a reasonable  amount of alcohol, and ha the vast major of "provocative" halloween costumes doesn't impact your ability to be a surgeon. They didn't just make people aware of what was available - they were directly judging what was available as well. That's the problem. 

Edited by rmorelan
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1 minute ago, rmorelan said:

I mean that is a bit of a tone deaf apology though - I mean being aware of what is there isn't the issue. It is that it doesn't matter, at least for a lot of the behaviours they mention, what was posted at all. If they want to apologize they should start with saying something along those lines - what is posted implies they didn't learn anything at all. Wearing a swimsuit, drinking a reasonable  amount of alcohol, and ha the vast major of "provocative" halloween costumes doesn't impact your ability to be a surgeon. They didn't just make people aware of what was available - they were directly judging what was available as well. That's the problem. 

Sorry I didn't edit it until later but it is also a Twitter thread!

Either way, something that seems suspicious to me is they made fake accounts to friend/follow these social media accounts... patients aren't going to do this, so why are they? (Obviously the other stuff doesn't impact your ability to be a healthcare professional)

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1 minute ago, sportyrichmd said:

Sorry I didn't edit it until later but it is also a Twitter thread!

Either way, something that seems suspicious to me is they made fake accounts to friend/follow these social media accounts... patients aren't going to do this, so why are they? (Obviously the other stuff doesn't impact your ability to be a healthcare professional)

some will - this is all less of a problem in Canada because of just how we run things. If you are paying a huge sum of money for something you tend to dig into this sort of stuff more. 

Doesn't mean people should post just anything on their social media feeds either mind you - and every class has this wonder phase when they realize how open they may be to things going into CARMS and suddenly it gets "interesting" - in part because they are afraid normal behaviour will somehow get them into trouble. It is that aspect that annoys me the most.

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"Clearly unprofessional  content  included:  Health  Insurance  Portabilityand  Accountability  Act  (HIPAA)  violations,  intoxicated appearance, unlawful behavior, possession of drugs or drug paraphernalia, and uncensored profanity or offensive comments about colleagues/work/patients. Potentially    unprofessional    content    included:    holding/consuming alcohol, inappropriate attire, censored profanity, controversial political or religious comments, and controversial social topics."

What the hell is considered to be an inappropriate attire? Does it depends on the context in which the picture is taken?

Why is it unprofessionnal to have an opinion?

What the hell is an intoxicated appearance?

What is the problem about drinking alcohol in your free time? Or even doing drugs (cannabis is legal, so what)?

Why the hell doctors can't behave like human beings?

I have SO MANY questions. I feel like I should email them. LOL

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