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Hi everyone! I was really hoping to receive some advice for one of my entries on the ABS. I was able to spend 160 hours shadowing a physician when I was 16, but he has recently retired and I have been trying to contact him since summer with no success. This is obviously a very significant part of my application because it allowed me to realize that I would love to have a career in medicine, but I don't know how else to include this in my application without his verification. I have proof that I volunteered in his office on paper, but nobody other than myself and family members would be able to verbally confirm that. What should I do?

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Was there anyone else in the office working with him at the time? A secretary? Nurse? Other student? Also, I may be wrong, but from what I've heard, Canadian schools don't really value shadowing and its more of an American thing. I don't know your application, but something to consider if you're applying in Canada.

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11 minutes ago, Spleen said:

Was there anyone else in the office working with him at the time? A secretary? Nurse? Other student? Also, I may be wrong, but from what I've heard, Canadian schools don't really value shadowing and its more of an American thing. I don't know your application, but something to consider if you're applying in Canada.

There was a receptionist but I only have contact information for the office which is now closed so I have no way of contacting the doctor or the receptionist. I also don't really think the shadowing part of my role was the most significant, I thought it would be important to show that I have been committed to exploring the field and dedicated many hours doing so.

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  • 2 weeks later...
10 minutes ago, neurologist19 said:

At least in BC, telling the committee that you were shadowing doctors when you were 16 is a big red flag. It breaches many layers of professionalism and the right to privacy and It can be telling that the applicant doesn't value the privacy of patients and medical ethics. 

I received consent from each patient before observing appointments and signed a confidentiality agreement. I wouldn't have participated if I wasn't allowed to/it wasn't ethical to do so.

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2 minutes ago, prochiv said:

I received consent from each patient before observing appointments and signed a confidentiality agreement. I wouldn't have participated if I wasn't allowed to/it wasn't ethical to do so.

Your choice of course, but It still raises red flags (Can I treat patients with their consent if I am not even a doctor? Consent is the  minimum not everything). On UBC's website they explicitly mentioned that.  Good luck with either approach you will take

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1 minute ago, neurologist19 said:

Your choice of course, but It still raises red flags (Can I treat patients with their consent if I am not even a doctor? Consent is the  minimum not everything). On UBC's website they explicitly mentioned that.  Good luck with either approach you will take

I am not applying to UBC so that's okay!

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