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Non- hierarchical specialties in medicine


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11 hours ago, bearded frog said:

FM or anything where you can hang a shingle and don't have to work for a hospital/organization, otherwise, unless you're the hospital CEO, there will always be someone above you. That being said, you can never escape your provincial college's regulations and your ministry's billing requirements...

 

 

15 hours ago, offmychestplease said:

FM. Get in, get out in 2 years. You're your own boss and can work anywhere, anytime and don't have to appease authority or "higher-ups".

I would assume that peds would also be a good fit as well as some lifestyle IM fields.

If you do something with a long training road like surgery you will always be around people who compare each other as to who did what fellowship where, have to compete and try and get along with older surgeon "higher-ups" to get any OR time, lots of egos etc. 

LOL... I was not planning on escaping regulations or rules or anything-- I just want to be my own boss and do whatever I want to do and I dislike working for organizations and having to appease authority or "higher ups" ( if I don't genuinely feel like it and I usually can't fake things for gain)... I also not a  competitive person at all, and don't compare myself to others.. just want to be able to make a difference in the lives of my patients, and do my own thing without having to compete for things... I guess FM or peds might be the best options for me :)

15 hours ago, rmorelan said:

kind of an interesting question because ultimately many doctors are at the top of whatever hierarchy is there. Do you mean what would be the best fit along the way, or at the end? 

 

yes, I meant along the way... I just dislike the sometimes hierarchical nature of medicine that is present in certain specialties.... 

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Just a suggestion, but maybe you should ask yourself why you have such trouble with authority and try to work on that? It seems a bit intense to me to choose a specialty based on that personality trait, which can definitely change / improve, and it might even not be so problematic in the end... and ultimately, no matter what, you'll become the one in charge, you'll be the doctor. What are your interests?

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2 hours ago, Mel96b said:

Just a suggestion, but maybe you should ask yourself why you have such trouble with authority and try to work on that? It seems a bit intense to me to choose a specialty based on that personality trait, which can definitely change / improve, and it might even not be so problematic in the end... and ultimately, no matter what, you'll become the one in charge, you'll be the doctor. What are your interests?

Not true. For most hospital-based specialties at a minimum you will be dealing with hospital admin. Moreover in general you will be working amongst partners/equals where at minimum you will share office space, divide up day time scheduling (e.g. OR time, clinic time), and partake in the responsibility of call.

I don't think OP would function well in a lengthy residency setting which is innately hierarchical, especially those that deal with acuity (as those situations are driven by hierarchy and roles). Basically OP is best off with an outpatient specialty, preferably one that deals with lower acuity. Really this means FM. After that if he/she can tolerate residency, then psych, IM, PMR, and neurology can be reasonable choices as they can subspecialize or work in relaxed outpatient settings (e.g. endo, movement disorders).

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1 hour ago, 1D7 said:

Not true. For most hospital-based specialties at a minimum you will be dealing with hospital admin. Moreover in general you will be working amongst partners/equals where at minimum you will share office space, divide up day time scheduling (e.g. OR time, clinic time), and partake in the responsibility of call.

I don't think OP would function well in a lengthy residency setting which is innately hierarchical, especially those that deal with acuity (as those situations are driven by hierarchy and roles). Basically OP is best off with an outpatient specialty, preferably one that deals with lower acuity. Really this means FM. After that if he/she can tolerate residency, then psych, IM, PMR, and neurology can be reasonable choices as they can subspecialize or work in relaxed outpatient settings (e.g. endo, movement disorders).

Not even equals, you'll have coworkers who are more senior than you. And usually the chair of the department has power over you. Ive seen some pretty nasty disagreements within specialties and between specialties in both academic and community sites.

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On 9/28/2020 at 10:41 PM, averagemedstudent said:

I am very non-hierarchial person, and I have tendency to challenge authority if I dont agree with them ( I usually voice my opinion politely, but honestly and bluntly)... Not all fields of medicine enjoy having this type of personality- which specialty would be a best fit?

The tendency to challenge authority if you don't agree with them doesn't make you right. As someone above suggested, consider working on your communication skills and also be humble. Being honest and being able to share your opinion are not weaknesses otherwise. 

TBH you might have trouble in any specialty, particularly in residency. Medicine and medical training is extremely hierarchical. 

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