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How difficult is it to practice in the States after graduating from a Canadian dental school?


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Hey everyone, 

I've been considering dentistry as a career for awhile, and was wondering if it's common to have a Canadian graduate being licensed and working in the States? While I've read that licensure requirements vary by each state, I was wondering how difficult in general the process is in getting licensed as well as getting an employer to sponsor a visa for you to work?

 

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5 hours ago, ForeverGreen said:

Hey everyone, 

I've been considering dentistry as a career for awhile, and was wondering if it's common to have a Canadian graduate being licensed and working in the States? While I've read that licensure requirements vary by each state, I was wondering how difficult in general the process is in getting licensed as well as getting an employer to sponsor a visa for you to work?

 

Theres always people that write both American Boards and Canadians. Less than half the class though. Most write to keep the option of specializing open, as States has more seats. The process itself as a Canadian grad is not that hard to work in the States. 

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Not difficult at all. I'd recommend doing the US boards regardless so you dont have to restudy later in your life if you choose to go practice there. Licensing requirements differ from state to state, though so you'd need to ensure that aspect is covered. There is often an additional practical exam like the NERB/ADEX to take for many of the states. If you do a residency, however, you would be eligible for licensure without that exam for approx. 8 states. NY state is the only state where in order to practice you need to have completed a residency.

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I went to a US dental school and graduated in 2016. Took both US and Canadian boards. I think it would be way easier to take US boards if you're already attending an American dental school because it would be easier to find patients when you're already in USA school.   As a Canadian, I don't know how you would find patients (maybe advertise via craiglist???).  

 I was initially thinking of practicing in US after graduation but from the limited interviews I had they weren't willing to sponsor TN visa.  Or the ones who did want to sponsor were usually shady corporations which I wanted to avoid. Ultimately, I decided to go back to Canada to be closer with family.

I believe there is a time lapse from once you've taken the US boards. I believe it's 5 years for most states. So, if you haven't practiced in US for 5 years after taking US boards, you would have to take the boards again I believe? But I'm not 100% on that.

 

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4 hours ago, Mauricio45 said:

I was initially thinking of practicing in US after graduation but from the limited interviews I had they weren't willing to sponsor TN visa

Well, they weren't willing to sponsor one because they can't sponsor one. A TN visa does not require or allow sponsorship. For a TN, you walk to the border and slam your passport on the officer's desk, show your valid degree, your job offer letter and they stamp your passport with a T1 stamp.

You or your employer were confusing it with an H1B which does require sponsorship and has a lottery and scares employers. Americans don't understand their own immigration laws so have to explain things to them like a six year old. Your employer wouldn't have to lift a finger beyond offering you a job if you're a Canadian dentist with a valid degree.

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37 minutes ago, zoxy said:

Well, they weren't willing to sponsor one because they can't sponsor one. A TN visa does not require or allow sponsorship. For a TN, you walk to the border and slam your passport on the officer's desk, show your valid degree, and your job offer letter and they stamp your passport with a T1 stamp.

You or your employer were confusing it with an H1B which does require sponsorship and has a lottery and scares employers. Americans don't understand their own immigration laws so have to explain things to them like a six year old. Your employer wouldn't have to lift a finger beyond offering you a job if you're a Canadian dentist with a valid degree.

Yes, that's the one I was confusing it with.  Now that I remember, I did explain to them what a TN visa is but they still were reluctant.  I only interviewed at 2 places before deciding to move back to Canada.  I know friends of mine that were able to get jobs in the US under a TN visa, so it is possible.

And the ones who did offer the H1B sponsorship were usually the shady corporation jobs that I wanted no part of.  It's a red flag that they were desperate to hire foreigners when no American would want to take that job.

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2 hours ago, Mauricio45 said:

I went to a US dental school and graduated in 2016. Took both US and Canadian boards. I think it would be way easier to take US boards if you're already attending an American dental school because it would be easier to find patients when you're already in USA school.   As a Canadian, I don't know how you would find patients (maybe advertise via craiglist???).  

 I was initially thinking of practicing in US after graduation but from the limited interviews I had they weren't willing to sponsor TN visa.  Or the ones who did want to sponsor were usually shady corporations which I wanted to avoid. Ultimately, I decided to go back to Canada to be closer with family.

I believe there is a time lapse from once you've taken the US boards. I believe it's 5 years for most states. So, if you haven't practiced in US for 5 years after taking US boards, you would have to take the boards again I believe? But I'm not 100% on that.

 

The clinical exam in the states expires, the iNBDE or part1/2 wont. Therefore always nice to have that out of the way, and then every state has their own clinical requirement as mentioned above. 

Canada doesnt have a clinical component like ADEX where you would need to find patients, its just the NDEB Written and OSCE (OSCE serving as the clinical component). This does not hold true if you are from a non accredited university, then you must go through the equivalency process (AFK, ACS, ACJ). 

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40 minutes ago, Hades said:

The clinical exam in the states expires, the iNBDE or part1/2 wont. Therefore always nice to have that out of the way, and then every state has their own clinical requirement as mentioned above. 

Canada doesnt have a clinical component like ADEX where you would need to find patients, its just the NDEB Written and OSCE (OSCE serving as the clinical component). This does not hold true if you are from a non accredited university, then you must go through the equivalency process (AFK, ACS, ACJ). 

 

The pandemic should be the catalyst to abolish the unethical and useless live patient board exam.

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2 hours ago, Mauricio45 said:

 

The pandemic should be the catalyst to abolish the unethical and useless live patient board exam.

For a number of states it is not even required if you take the Candian OSCE. And as of now there are six states that accept the DLOSCE as a pathway to licensure.

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