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Requirements to move to US to practice with Canadian license


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I am a recently RC certified radiologist and was thinking about maybe moving to the states in the future. However, I didn't write my ABR due to all the COVID restrictions this past year making scheduling/traveling for it difficult, though I did complete my USMLEs. I was wondering if anyone has any information on whether I would need to complete the ABR to work in the states, or is there some form of reciprocal license for the Canadian Royal College FRCPC in certain states? If I do have to write the ABR, would it be both the Core and the Certifying, or could the FRCPC be used as credit for either part of the ABR? Any links to current information would be greatly appreciated!
 
I apologize if this is the incorrect place to post this, but I can't seem to find any current information on this topic. Thanks in advance!

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  • 8 months later...
On 7/11/2021 at 6:33 PM, RadX said:

I am a recently RC certified radiologist and was thinking about maybe moving to the states in the future. However, I didn't write my ABR due to all the COVID restrictions this past year making scheduling/traveling for it difficult, though I did complete my USMLEs. I was wondering if anyone has any information on whether I would need to complete the ABR to work in the states, or is there some form of reciprocal license for the Canadian Royal College FRCPC in certain states? If I do have to write the ABR, would it be both the Core and the Certifying, or could the FRCPC be used as credit for either part of the ABR? Any links to current information would be greatly appreciated!
 
I apologize if this is the incorrect place to post this, but I can't seem to find any current information on this topic. Thanks in advance!

just wanted to bump this in case anyone has any info!

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  • 2 months later...

Hi there; 

I'm a FRCPC, US fellowship-trained, and recently wrote the ABRs.  (FYI, the exams were moved to an online platform during the current pandemic, so you complete them at home.)  I've been in touch with a few US centres who are looking for radiologists, and some do require completion of the ABR exams (it seems to be state dependent).  Yes, both the Core and Certifying exams are required.  FYI, the Core is easy compared to the Canadian Royal College exams.  ...and the Certifying exam, I've heard, is even easier.

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1 hour ago, HounsfieldUnit said:

Hi there; 

I'm a FRCPC, US fellowship-trained, and recently wrote the ABRs.  (FYI, the exams were moved to an online platform during the current pandemic, so you complete them at home.)  I've been in touch with a few US centres who are looking for radiologists, and some do require completion of the ABR exams (it seems to be state dependent).  Yes, both the Core and Certifying exams are required.  FYI, the Core is easy compared to the Canadian Royal College exams.  ...and the Certifying exam, I've heard, is even easier.

Are radiologists considering moving to the US due to lower cost of living and taxes?

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On 6/18/2022 at 11:41 AM, ArchEnemy said:

Are radiologists considering moving to the US due to lower cost of living and taxes?

There are myriad reasons to practice in the US.  Lower taxes can be one (depending on the state).  I know some radiologists who have moved to California or Arizona for the weather.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/27/2022 at 3:32 AM, HounsfieldUnit said:

No.  The USMLEs are not required to work in CA.

Wouldn't you still need to complete the USMLE exams for visa purposes (unless you are a US citizen)? A lot of states don't require you to write them for licensing; most Canadians only really write them for immigration purposes.

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21 hours ago, sdfsdfgsdrfa said:

Wouldn't you still need to complete the USMLE exams for visa purposes (unless you are a US citizen)? A lot of states don't require you to write them for licensing; most Canadians only really write them for immigration purposes.

No, not necessarily, but this is also state-dependent.  I have not written the USMLEs and currently hold a California state medical license.  I worked in the US on a J-1 visa and, again, did not need the USMLEs to obtain this.

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On 7/8/2022 at 8:12 AM, HounsfieldUnit said:

No, not necessarily, but this is also state-dependent.  I have not written the USMLEs and currently hold a California state medical license.  I worked in the US on a J-1 visa and, again, did not need the USMLEs to obtain this.

You do need the USMLEs to get an H1B Visa... When you say you 'worked' on a J-1 Visa, you must mean fellowship, as J-1 visas are exchange visitor visas (for educational purposes), not an actual work visa. 

The whole working in the US thing comes up pretty frequently on the forums these days, and the barebones summary of the components you need to work in the states are the following:

1. Board Certification/Board Eligibility - Governed by each respective specialties' board (ex. American Board of Radiology) 

  • Requirement 1: Take and pass the boards of your field
  • Requirement 2: Equivalent length of training (Not a problem for most fields except some surgical subspecs)

2. State Medical License - Governed by each State's medical authority 

  • Requirement 1: USMLE or equivalent (most states take the LMCC as an equivalent)

3. H1B Visa - Governed Federally 

  • Requirement 1: USMLEs (This is why you need them to work in the states, not for the state license)
  • Requirement 2: Sponsored by employer (ie Hospital, academic centre, private practice, etc)

If you have 1, 2. and 3, you are good to go. There are some minor exceptions and minute details I have not mentioned, but the above is what will apply to most people. I also have not mentioned all the requirements for each component, just the most limiting requirement for a Canadian.

 

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On 7/9/2022 at 2:25 PM, inquirer007 said:

You do need the USMLEs to get an H1B Visa... When you say you 'worked' on a J-1 Visa, you must mean fellowship, as J-1 visas are exchange visitor visas (for educational purposes), not an actual work visa. 

3. H1B Visa - Governed Federally 

  • Requirement 1: USMLEs (This is why you need them to work in the states, not for the state license)
  • Requirement 2: Sponsored by employer (ie Hospital, academic centre, private practice, etc)

If you have 1, 2. and 3, you are good to go. There are some minor exceptions and minute details I have not mentioned, but the above is what will apply to most people. I also have not mentioned all the requirements for each component, just the most limiting requirement for a Canadian.

 

The other visa option is the O-1 non-immigrant visa (which is what I may end up with), and which can lead to obtaining a green card.  The USMLEs are not required for this, although other components are (research productivity, teaching, etc.).

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9 hours ago, HounsfieldUnit said:

The other visa option is the O-1 non-immigrant visa (which is what I may end up with), and which can lead to obtaining a green card.  The USMLEs are not required for this, although other components are (research productivity, teaching, etc.).

That is true, but it's important to mention that is not the main Visa used, and is not a guarantee. Otherwise readers might think you can just roll up to the states for independent practice with no USMLEs, which is not true ( barring the exception that you are a unique and talented applicant that can get an O Visa)

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  • 2 months later...
On 7/11/2022 at 2:50 AM, HounsfieldUnit said:

The other visa option is the O-1 non-immigrant visa (which is what I may end up with), and which can lead to obtaining a green card.  The USMLEs are not required for this, although other components are (research productivity, teaching, etc.).

Just a caveat for those considering the O1 visa: if you are using it to avoid the J1 2 yr home residency requirement, the O1 does not provide a pathway to a green card. (But it will let you work in the US immediately after a J1 fellowship, without returning to your home country for 2 years.) 

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