Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)


Recommended Posts

Rejected

 

IP

oGPA - 86.22

aGPA - 86.55

AG - 25.58

NAQ - 29.00

TFR - 54.58

MCAT - 512, 129 CARS

Interview - below average

 

Absolutely devastated. This is my 5th time applying to UBC, 2nd time interviewing, but I've had about 9 interviews over the last 4 years. I seem to be terrible at interviewing but I really thought this year was different. I practiced a lot, and I walked out of this year's UBC interview thinking I had nailed a lot of the stations, and done decently well at the others. Didn't feel like I bombed any, so at this point I don't even know how to improve it. Pretty much lost all hope now, feeling completely defeated

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 792
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Result: Accepted (VFMP) off the Wait-list 6/8/2020 Geography: IP Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Timestamp: 3:45 PM PST  aGPA: 85.1% ~22.5 AQMCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB): 513 (128/

After 6 years of applying to UBC Medicine... going through all the possibilities (regrets before interview, to regrets after interview, to regrets after waitlist, to being ineligible for 2 whole years

Felt I should add my stats in here because I’m super stoked and would want someone like me who was applying to see this... 2013 was my first application to medical schools in Canada, 2019 was my

I know how you feel, I've been in the same boat for many years. This is my 5th time applying, 3rd time interviewing. I have had close to 10 interviews over the last 5 cycles and was rejected post interview at every single one of them. I also had below average interview score at UBC the last 2 times I was rejected. I only have the old MCAT score and I felt like giving up after this year, but it somehow worked out. Please don't give up because you never know what could happen next year. What is one more year in a 40 year long career for something you love to do for the rest of your life.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Accepted: VFMP  


Time stamp: May 12th, 2017 


GPA:  91 


MCAT: 512 


NAQ: various long term commitments related to my hobbies, leadership, volunteering & research 


Interview: after being waitlisted (interview score: average), I realized I wasn't giving it all to prepare. This time, I prepared thoroughly, but I still walked out of the interview feeling very unsure.  


Feel free to PM me if you have any questions! I remember how stressful it was to be on the waitlist. This process has so much to do with luck, so keep pushing forward. 


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rejected

 

IP

oGPA - 86.22

aGPA - 86.55

AG - 25.58

NAQ - 29.00

TFR - 54.58

MCAT - 512, 129 CARS

Interview - below average

 

Absolutely devastated. This is my 5th time applying to UBC, 2nd time interviewing, but I've had about 9 interviews over the last 4 years. I seem to be terrible at interviewing but I really thought this year was different. I practiced a lot, and I walked out of this year's UBC interview thinking I had nailed a lot of the stations, and done decently well at the others. Didn't feel like I bombed any, so at this point I don't even know how to improve it. Pretty much lost all hope now, feeling completely defeated

I can only imagine how frustrating and hopeless you must be feeling, but don't give up if this is what you really want! I don't know if I have the answers to anything, but if you wanted to talk about the interview process feel free to PM me. I used to host mock MMIs for pharmacy applicants so I can try my best to help, or you can get my contact and we can talk closer to the next interview date?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Incredibly privileged to have gotten into both UBC and UofT. I'm honestly on the fence so any input from current students would be much appreciated!

 

 

 

 

I may or may not take this offer. Will have a very difficult time deciding on UBC (a new adventure, an amazing school and city) vs U of T (close to home, always been a dream). Any insight would help!

 

 

 

Now for the tough decision of whether to head out east, or stay in Vancouver...

 

 

Long time lurker, but I can actually give some insight here.

 

For those debating between UBC and heading to UofT, I figured I'd throw in my two cents (having lived in both cities (but only studied at UofT)).

 

A little about me: I grew up in BC so I lived there quite a substantial portion of my life. I am currently doing Grad School at UofT and have lived here for a few years now.

 

The main reason I chose UofT for my grad studies is the opportunities that living in Toronto/studying at UofT provides (especially if you're interested in research). It's ranked as one of the top schools in the world, both medical and in general. In addition, there's at least 3 Hospitals within arms reach from Campus, which all have doctors that specialize in  different things, so it's really easy to find your niche. Through my time here I've found it incredibly easy to meet with physicians and this is HUGE for networking and getting placements.

 

In addition, Toronto's a big city - there's always stuff to do. The city is starting to grow on me a lot (yes, this is coming from a Vancouverite, which shocks me too). #westcoastbestcoast But in all seriousness, there's lot of opportunities here not only for medical school but also for involvement in the community and for having fun. It's really difficult to get bored here.

 

As for UBC, I don't know much about the studying in BC. I can say from my time there, Vancouver/BC is lovely if you enjoy the outdoors but there's nowhere near as many things to do there as Toronto. As for the Hospitals in BC, I believe they're a bit more spread out, so you might not have as much expertise directly accessible to you.

 

Overall, I'd say it's really up to you. Vancouver/BC is a great place to live and there's a lot of outdoorsy things to do. The Medical School is good too and they do provide resources spread through all 4 campuses and seem encourage students to get involved. On the other hand, UofT is situated in the center of Canada's biggest city, with a plethora of opportunities to get involved and hospitals within an arms reach. As for the city itself, I truly do enjoy it - There's always something going on, which is why I think I've come to enjoy living here so much, even though I might miss nature and the vibe from BC once in a while.

 

Whatever you decide, good luck! I'm sure you'll make the right choice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone, just wanted to post about my journey to give others going through a similar situation some hope. 

 

Stats:

Accepted (IP): VFMP 

AGPA: ~83

MCAT: 512

completed undergrad and masters

 

This is my 4th time applying to UBC and second time interviewing. I've had 3 other interviews in other provinces previously, got rejected twice, and waitlisted once. I've been trying to get into med consistently for 5 years straight. As much as I hate saying 'I understand', I actually understand how it feels to be rejected every year and at the verge of losing hope each time. It still stings to remember the rejection emails that I received. Somehow, the stars aligned for me when I felt that I had little chance each year as the application pools get more competitive. All I will say is that if you truly believe that this is the career path for you, and nothing else, then keep on persevering. Your calls will be answered in due time. Please don't give up.

 

With that said, heres what I did to improve my application: 

Academics: When I finished my undergrad at UBC, my average was garbage because I just didn't study in the first two years. It becomes really hard to pull yourself out of the hole when that happens, but I worked my butt off in the last two years and did very well. I moved to another province to work, and became IP and applied to med school, and also applied to a masters program. I got interviews from med school that year, and I also got an offer to do a masters. I accepted the offer to do masters and just decided to apply to med in the meantime. I worked my ass off and did very well in my course based masters. I applied a couple more times and got rejected, one year with no interviews at all. So I moved back home to BC and applied to UBC. I got an interview last year, then got rejected. Applied again for this cycle and the stars aligned. The moral is, if your academics aren't stellar, don't just study anything to boost your GPA. Study something that you can put to good use as a career itself, as I will explain how my masters helped me improve my non-academics below. 

 

Non-academics: I started out with a couple of the usual pre-med starter pack set of volunteering activities, like volunteering at hospitals, community centres, etc. What really transformed my application I think, are the things I did with my masters. I did international work and involved myself in research. I joined non-governmental organizations and worked with them along side finishing my internship for my masters program. The result is that I got involved in multiple activities, with amazing networking opportunities through each. I capitalized on those networks and continued to build on these activities. At the end I had published papers, and gave presentations at multiple conferences internationally. I also started a couple companies based on my hobbies. My application transformed from the pre-med starter pack set of activities to things I was truly passionate about, and I'd like to think it showed. Even though I had medicine in the back of my mind, everything I did in the moment was to set myself up to be in a better position WITHOUT medicine, not just for it. So if I were to give anyone advice, it would be: do the things that you are passionate about and that put you in a better position to live life as if medicine will not happen. Please don't live your life JUST to improve your medical applications because it may be a waste of time. 

 

Interviews: I was always average-above average. I just practiced with student groups and by myself. MMI interviews at some schools, such as UBC, are transforming so that their questions aren't ones you can prepare for. Don't expect ethical type questions to come up frequently because they know that you can read a book and answer those questions. They want the real, raw, you, not someone who got coached to answer every question with the same framework. With that said, I found it helpful to read around general topics like health care (duh!), and contemporary issues in society. Ultimately, its your experience in life that will shape you and the way you answer your questions. 

 

ps. I dont profess that this is the only way or best way to get accepted, but this is what worked for me. To those who got accepted, huge congratulations and I look forward to meeting you! To those who weren't lucky this time, please don't give up. Keep working hard and things will work out for you in the end.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone, just wanted to post about my journey to give others going through a similar situation some hope. 

 

Stats:

Accepted (IP): VFMP 

AGPA: ~83

AQ: ~21 (last year)

NAQ: ~34 (last year)

MCAT: 512 (wrote old MCAT twice as well)

completed undergrad and MPH

 

This is my 4th time applying to UBC and second time interviewing. I've had 3 other interviews in Alberta previously, got rejected twice, and waitlisted once. I've been trying to get into med consistently for 5 years straight. As much as I hate saying 'I understand', I actually understand how it feels to be rejected every year and at the verge of losing hope each time. It still stings to remember the rejection emails that I received. Somehow, the stars aligned for me when I felt that I had little chance each year as the application pools get more competitive. All I will say is that if you truly believe that this is the career path for you, and nothing else, then keep on persevering. Your calls will be answered in due time. Please don't give up.

 

With that said, heres what I did to improve my application: 

Academics: When I finished my undergrad at UBC, my average was garbage because I just didn't study in the first two years. It becomes really hard to pull yourself out of the hole when that happens, but I worked my butt off in the last two years and did very well. I moved to Alberta to work, and became IP and applied for both medical schools, and also applied to the public health program because I was very interested in a degree in public health, whether before or after med. I got interviews from both schools in Alberta that year, and got waitlisted at U of C. I also got an offer to study public health at U of A. I accepted the offer to study public health and just decided to apply to med in the meantime. I worked my ass off and did very well in my course based masters. I applied a couple more times and got rejected, one year with no interviews at all. So I moved back home to BC and applied to UBC. I got an interview last year, then got rejected. Applied again for this cycle and the stars aligned. The moral is, if your academics aren't stellar, don't just study anything to boost your GPA. Study something that you can put to good use as a career itself, as I will explain how my masters helped me improve my non-academics below. 

 

Non-academics: I started out with a couple of the usual pre-med starter pack set of volunteering activities, like volunteering at hospitals, community centres, etc. What really transformed my application I think, are the things I did with my masters. I did international public health work and involved myself in research. I joined non-governmental organizations and worked with them along side finishing my internship for my masters program. The result is that I got involved in multiple activities, with amazing networking opportunities through each. I capitalized on those networks and continued to build on these activities. At the end I had published papers, and gave presentations at multiple conferences internationally. I also started a couple companies based on my hobbies. My application transformed from the pre-med starter pack set of activities to things I was truly passionate about, and I'd like to think it showed. Even though I had medicine in the back of my mind, everything I did in the moment was to set myself up to be in a better position WITHOUT medicine, not just for it. So if I were to give anyone advice, it would be: do the things that you are passionate about and that put you in a better position to live life as if medicine will not happen. Please don't live your life JUST to improve your medical applications because it may be a waste of time. 

 

Interviews: I was always average-above average. I just practiced with student groups and by myself. MMI interviews at some schools, such as UBC, are transforming so that their questions aren't ones you can prepare for. Don't expect ethical type questions to come up frequently because they know that you can read a book and answer those questions. They want the real, raw, you, not sometime who got coached to answer every question with the same framework. With that said, I found it helpful to read around general topics like health care (duh!), and contemporary issues in society. Ultimately, its your experience in life that will shape you and the way you answer your questions. 

 

ps. I dont profess that this is the only way or best way to get accepted, but this is what worked for me. To those who got accepted, huge congratulations and I look forward to meeting you! To those who weren't lucky this time, please don't give up. Keep working hard and things will work out for you in the end.

 

You, your stats and your story are what I needed to see.

Thank you and congrats :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also a longtime lurker here. 


 


Accepted: VFMP  


Time stamp: May 12th, 2017 


AGPA:  ~86


MCAT: 33 (old MCAT)


NAQ: Research experience, no pubs, long-term mental health volunteering, various clubs, varsity sport, hobbies.


Interview: First-time interviewee at any med school, thought it went pretty badly. I was not happy with at least 3 stations but all I can say is be genuine, be yourself and that will come through. People often put a lot of pressure on themselves to be perfect - but the interview will not be perfect no matter how hard you try.. just be honest, genuine, and take the time to think of your answers and that will come through. 


 


Also feel free to PM me with any questions - I can't promise that I'll have all the answers but I can try to help at least a little :) 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Long-time lurker, thanks for the support

 

Accepted (IP): SMP

Time stamp: May 12th, 4:10pm

OGPA: ~93

MCAT: 521 (129/129/132/131)
ECs: multiple roles at a summer camp, university-related (orientation leader, course union work), hospital + nursing home, research lab, music. Do things you're interested in, and show commitment to those things!

Interview: This was my first MMI and I felt decent about most of it (with the exception of a few stations). The important MMI tips I picked out from my google spree boiled down to: give well-structured answers, consider multiple perspectives, get your pace and timing right (i.e. long enough to be a complete response, but leave time for follow-up questions), be very aware of assumptions and stereotypes you make during the first reading of the prompt. Broadly, be ready for anything that gets thrown at you, and even if you have no idea what to do with a prompt, show that you can attempt to analyze what's there and give a coherent response. 

 

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions, I'd love to help in any way I can.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Result: Accepted - VFMP

My stats from last year:

oGPA: 82.15

pGPA: 82.41

aGPA: 88.90

AQ: 30.03

NAQ: 25.27

TFR: 55.30

MCAT: 513 (127 127 127 132)

Interview: Above Average, felt great after.

 

My second year applying, non-trad. Annnnnnnd I realized through this cycle that I completely screwed up last year, forgetting to upload my passport as proof of citizenship. So this year I was super nervous wondering if maybe I would have gotten in last year or if I'd get rejected again.

 

So happy to get in, it's incredible. 5 years ago I was 26, a college drop-out, a washed up athlete. The company I was working for in Vancouver went under and I had no savings, no education and nowhere to go. I was walking down the sea wall with a friend and he asked me what I'd do if I could do anything and I thought about it and said "be a doctor". He said "so do it". Had to do my grade 11 and 12 chem/biology at an elementary school to get my courses to even start my science pre-req's, opening at Starbucks and closing the bar as a bartender to make ends meet. The acceptance letter on Friday felt like an impossibility back then. I can't wait to start in August.

 

Guys if you didn't make it this year, keep going. Try not to let it define you, because this road is not for the faint of heart. Live life, work hard and do things you're passionate about. I'm happy to chat via PM if anyone has any questions or needs support!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Accepted to Kelowna

 

Result: rejected (2014), rejected (2015), rejected (2016), Accepted into SMP (2017)

GPA: ~90% overall, adjusted, and old pre-req's.

AQ: ~32-33 (2014-2016)

NAQ: 33 (2016)

TFR: 64.5 (2014), 61.5 (2015), 65.6 (2016)

MCAT: 26 (2014-2017) and had to do it 3 times before getting above 6 on verbal (I got an 8 on my third attempt). ***Then I thought the verbal was holding me back so I spent all summer only studying that section, and bought a prep course, and ended up doing worse with a 5! (What a waste of time, money and emotional stress!)***

Interview: below average (2014-2016) and assuming average or above this time around (or maybe they were just tired of reviewing my application?!).

 

Completed undergrad and a masters.

 

After being rejected with a 'below average' interview three years in a row, I pretty much gave up and assumed something was wrong with me that I was completely unaware of. I'm sorry for those who received regrets this time around, and for those who are waiting on the waitlist. Any words of advice I can give would just be a repeat from others. Do what you love, live your life, and be the best you can be in whatever you are passionate about and you will get in somewhere eventually. I know people wonder how to get a high NAQ and from my experience I have been consistently high with minimal volunteering. My experience ranges from a lot of diverse paid work experience, and high level athletics (international competitions for 8 years). If anyone wants specific advice feel free to message me. 

 

Good luck to the waitlisters I hope it moves fast for you! And good luck to those who continue to re-apply. The longer you wait the sweeter it will feel ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Stats: accepted to VFMP

Location: OOP

MCAT: 525

GPA: around 95% (4.00)

ECs: I did a lot of things that I enjoy! Such as learning a new language, yoga, volunteering regarding the social determinants of health, and student leadership. Most of my commitments were fairly long term (3+ years).

Interview: I had a great time at the interview. I felt it was more of a conversation than a traditional MMI format. I went in and presented the most authentic version of myself that I could.

 

Super psyched to be accepted at UBC!! However, I'm not sure if I'll be accepting yet because I'm still waiting on results from one more school. Good luck to everyone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Accepted: VFMP

Time stamp: May 12th, 3:39PM PST

IP graduated BSc 2014

AGPA: 83.6%

MCAT: 10/7/10 (wrote the MCAT 3 times)

Interview: Felt much better about this year's MMI interview than the last 2 years. Had a good idea of what kind of topics they ask and so I was able to prepare accordingly. Practiced a few hours each week with family and friends since I was working full-time, but at the end of the day, it's quality practice over quantity practice. 

ECs: sports, music, research, volunteering, school clubs, worked 6 different jobs since I was 16. I don’t have anything special, just long-term commitments that I enjoyed doing.

I am a 5 time applicant (2012/2013, 2013/2014, 2014/2015, 2015/2016, 2016/2017), and interviewed in the past 3 times: 2014/2015 (below average), 2015/2016 (average) and 2016/2017.

This is my first time posting since before, I was so ashamed of putting my rejection results. Each rejection stung deeply yet was also a source of motivation - I worked on improving my GPA (it was 80.1% in 2012/2013 cycle, rewrote the MCAT (it was 9/7/8 for the 2013/2014 cycle), reworded my extracurriculars on my NAQ (increased it to a score of 38 for the 2014/2015 cycle), and changed my interview approach after each unsuccessful interview cycle. I know the frustration, depression, sadness, anger and all the emotions that come with this long journey, however I am willing to meet one-on-one with any applicant applying or reapplying to UBC for the 2017/2018 application cycle and help improve your application, especially if it's with increasing the NAQ score or improving the MMI interview. Having participated in 3 MMI cycles at UBC, I have a good idea on the kind of questions UBC asks. My NAQ scores also have been consistently between 30-38, increasing in each year of application so I also have a good feel on what UBC is looking for. 

DISCLAIMER: I will NOT be disclosing any MMI questions due to the confidentiality agreement however I am willing to work with you and give you NAQ writing/interview strategies and tricks to make your application stronger. Note also though that my approach is NOT the “only right” strategy or way to get in, however having gone through the UBC application 5 times, and each time getting a bit closer to being accepted, I would say I have some knowledge of what’s going on.

PM for more details!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Result: Waitlisted
 

aGPA:~88
AQ: N/A
NAQ: N/A
TFR: N/A
MCAT: 31 
Interview: First time interviewing - felt pretty good coming out but started to doubt my answers afterwards. 

 

Now the wait begins....I know there is speculation that there are roughly 70-90 ppl on the wait list. Is there anybody who has more information on this?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Result: Waitlisted

 

aGPA:~88

AQ: N/A

NAQ: N/A

TFR: N/A

MCAT: 31 

Interview: First time interviewing - felt pretty good coming out but started to doubt my answers afterwards. 

 

Now the wait begins....I know there is speculation that there are roughly 70-90 ppl on the wait list. Is there anybody who has more information on this?

Only that every year approximately 35-40 people get in off the wait list. No idea how anyone can speculate how many people are on it to begin with. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven`t really posted on these forums but reading posts throughout the application process reminded me that I wasn`t alone. I don't log on very often but I will check my messages more frequently for the next few weeks if anyone has any questions :)


 


Result: rejected (2016), Accepted into VFMP (2017)


GPA: 88.86%


AQ: 29.96


NAQ: 26.41 


TFR: 56.37


MCAT: 511 (2015), 512 (2016 - 128/125/128/131) - Improving my MCAT by a single point in CARS on my second attempt was pretty rough considering the hard work I put in the second time round. Much of this work was undermined by the fact that I didn't sleep a single minute the night before the exam. If you're considering rewriting the MCAT, no matter what the result, acknowledge the significance of choosing to sacrifice an entire summer to study for the MCAT lol.... you know you actually want to pursue med school at that point


Interview: below average (2016) 


 


After the interview I felt pretty good. Some of the questions were pretty tough, but I just acknowledged that during the stations and had fun with it (maybe a little bit too much fun - but I will not disclose details as much as I'd like to lol). I walked out of there happy that I didn't BS or have a nervous breakdown, to me that was something to be happy about because I figured my personality and composure would score me some points.


 


It was a long journey full of doubt but the process was necessary. Getting rejected last year allowed me time away from academics after completing my bachelors to evaluate whether or not this is the correct path for me. I gained extensive clinical experience over the past year which made the wait so much more bearable. 


 


To everyone that got rejected this year, use it as an opportunity to do something your passionate about. Give yourself time to recuperate, but do not let this result define you. Improve your application by doing the things you love, and stay grounded throughout the entire process. I am entering the program with clinical experience and maturity that I would not have had if I had gotten in last year. There is ALWAYS a silver lining - you got this. 


Link to post
Share on other sites

Result:Accepted VFMP

GPA: 94.6%

NAQ: I did things that I truly enjoyed! Some school clubs, lots of employment (research & customer service), two weekly community volunteering (red cross + testing clinic) and random gigs in the summer time.

MCAT:519

Just finished UG3

 

So important to create your own path. I made sure to do activities in all areas (community vs school vs employment) but only doing ones that I truly enjoy. This shows during your interview :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Result: Accepted - VFMP

Time stamp: May 12th, 3:40 PM PST

Geography: IP, 4th year

AGPA: 88.8%

MCAT: 518 (129/128/130/131)

Interview: Honestly, this interview did not go so well for me. Probably did well on 5 of the stations, okay on a few more, and could have done a lot better on the rest.

ECs: a lot of on-campus activities, research, clinical volunteering

 

I'll be declining this offer. Best of luck to those on the waitlist!

Link to post
Share on other sites

A SURVEY is now up for this thread!!!! Instead of scouring all the pages for info on past applications, I made a google form to complete below. It is for previous applicants who have received an interview. Summary data of all the responses will be shared after completing the form, so hopefully this will become an additional resource in addition to this premed101 thread!

 

Link - https://goo.gl/forms/8JHkLqmGu5PnlhED3

 

Hopefully this will help us better understand what competitive applications look like, and how to better improve when applying next year. Unfortunately I was rejected after interview this year, and hopefully others who have also been rejected can contribute to better understand what we can improve. If you have been accepted, congratulations, your response is also needed despite the lack for info for NAQ and interview scores. If you have finally been accepted after multiple attempts (like most people), please enter in your unsuccessful attempts as well since they would be a major help to those who were in the same shoes as a second,third,fourth ...time applicant. If you've been waitlisted then rejected, your information is the most vital of all!!! Since you must have been in the top 60 or so (an estimate, since UBC won't actually release the size of the waitlist) applicants who have concrete data in what makes a great application.

 

Below is my results from my application this year. It can also be found on the survey after you have submitted your response. Hope it helps. To other applicants planning to reapply, hopefully this will allow us to be better next cycle. To those who have gotten in, congratulations, feel free to contribute if you would like to share your app info and lend us a hand.

 

Cycle: 2016/2017

Result: Rejected

Geo: IP

aGPA: 87

AQ: 26.28

NAQ: 29

TFR: 55.28

MCAT: 502 (127/125/126/124 Chem/CARS/Bio/Psych)

Interview: Above Average

ECs: Club work, some clinical research, humanitarian/community projects from end of high school though Uni. 2 entry level jobs stints. ~2 years of ER volunteering

Link to post
Share on other sites

A SURVEY is now up for this thread!!!! Instead of scouring all the pages for info on past applications, I made a google form to complete below. It is for previous applicants who have received an interview. Summary data of all the responses will be shared after completing the form, so hopefully this will become an additional resource in addition to this premed101 thread!

 

Link - https://goo.gl/forms/8JHkLqmGu5PnlhED3

 

Hopefully this will help us better understand what competitive applications look like, and how to better improve when applying next year. Unfortunately I was rejected after interview this year, and hopefully others who have also been rejected can contribute to better understand what we can improve. If you have been accepted, congratulations, your response is also needed despite the lack for info for NAQ and interview scores. If you have finally been accepted after multiple attempts (like most people), please enter in your unsuccessful attempts as well since they would be a major help to those who were in the same shoes as a second,third,fourth ...time applicant. If you've been waitlisted then rejected, your information is the most vital of all!!! Since you must have been in the top 60 or so (an estimate, since UBC won't actually release the size of the waitlist) applicants who have concrete data in what makes a great application.

 

Below is my results from my application this year. It can also be found on the survey after you have submitted your response. Hope it helps. To other applicants planning to reapply, hopefully this will allow us to be better next cycle. To those who have gotten in, congratulations, feel free to contribute if you would like to share your app info and lend us a hand.

 

Cycle: 2016/2017

Result: Rejected

Geo: IP

aGPA: 87

AQ: 26.28

NAQ: 29

TFR: 55.28

MCAT: 502 (127/125/126/124 Chem/CARS/Bio/Psych)

Interview: Above Average

ECs: Club work, some clinical research, humanitarian/community projects from end of high school though Uni. 2 entry level jobs stints. ~2 years of ER volunteering

Your 502 MCAT is more likely than not, your issue.  AQ/NAQ are solid.  interview solid. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey I've never posted on here, just been creeping for years, so I thought I would post my stats in case it helps! 

 

Accepted: VFMP

Time stamp: May 12th, 3:39PM PST

IP - 4th Year Undergrad

GPA - 87.4%

MCAT: 514

Interview: It was my first time applying and interviewing, and my only interview. I felt really good immediately after, and I honestly had a lot of fun during it. I was very relaxed, felt like I was being myself and just having a very casual conversation at most of the stations. I only finished early in one station (about 30 seconds) and didn't feel awful about any of them. Over the weeks that followed I obviously picked apart every single answer and thought it was awful, but my original feelings were probably more accurate since I got accepted.

 

ECs: long term dancer up till high school (5000+ hours), research (2 years), volunteering (all over since grade 10), school clubs (jumped around a bit), a few awards, and long term commitments with a couple of non-profits over the past 4 years. Also wrote about my personal struggles with a serious injury and an eating disorder/mental illness.

 

SO EXCITED! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey I've never posted on here, just been creeping for years, so I thought I would post my stats in case it helps! 

 

Accepted: VFMP

Time stamp: May 12th, 3:39PM PST

IP - 4th Year Undergrad

GPA - 87.4%

MCAT: 514

Interview: It was my first time applying and interviewing, and my only interview. I felt really good immediately after, and I honestly had a lot of fun during it. I was very relaxed, felt like I was being myself and just having a very casual conversation at most of the stations. I only finished early in one station (about 30 seconds) and didn't feel awful about any of them. Over the weeks that followed I obviously picked apart every single answer and thought it was awful, but my original feelings were probably more accurate since I got accepted.

 

ECs: long term dancer up till high school (5000+ hours), research (2 years), volunteering (all over since grade 10), school clubs (jumped around a bit), a few awards, and long term commitments with a couple of non-profits over the past 4 years. Also wrote about my personal struggles with a serious injury and an eating disorder/mental illness.

 

SO EXCITED! 

literally thought I was reading my own post until the dancing part! excited to meet you premed101 doppelganger :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...