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Scoring of Interviews


Guest thelaze

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Guest thelaze

Hey, do any of the Queen's mods know how our interviews are evaluated? I'm sure there are a list of criteria that each interviewee gets marked on, but is there anything other scoring method to speak of? I ask because I had what I would consider an atypical interview for Queen's (ie, lots of current events and healthcare questions, not very conversational, not a lot of talk about me) and I'm wondering if maybe there's a way to account for the difference in interview styles in the scoring - like maybe the interviewers rank the people they see in a given day or something.

 

(Yes I'm grasping at straws - this wait is going to kill me)

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Guest peachy

Okay, if the mods aren't allowed to say, I assume I'm allowed to guess as an ignorant interviewee :P

 

I got the distinct sense from a couple of my questions that they were trying to cover a set of criteria. Once they flat-out asked for an example of a criterion (adaptability to change), and then commented that they really already knew of an example of that so we could move on. :) Which, in hindsight, seems a little check-listy.

 

They were sooooooooooooooooo nice!! :)

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Guest Emila

I was expecting more questions about my sketch but got quite a few healthcare related ones. I feel like some questions really count and others don't matter. What can they possibly gain from the type of kitchen appliance you choose to be?

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Guest thelaze

What I think I'm trying to get at is that there are definitely schools who rank applicants' essays, like Mac and U of T (I think) based on a group of 25 or so read by a specific person, so... in light of that is it possible that interviews are also ranked in a similar way?

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Guest Emila

Do the three interviewers come up with a score individually and add it together for a composite score (like the PIF)? Or do they discuss you right after the interview and come up with a score together?

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Guest Oregano112

I got questions about the last three books I read and what my favorite food was. I don't really understand why they ask those things (especially the food one).

 

Does it tell them anything about me that I can list the last three books that I read? They've probably never heard of any of them anyway so what's the point?

 

~R~

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Guest cgb2006

Let me first say that I am not an interviewer. I have however had many experiences being interviewed and as an interviewer (in other realms).

 

After having experienced the admissions process here at Queen's, and other schools for that matter, I really and truly believe that the purpose of the interview at Queen's is to evaluate the candidate's ability to convey a message clearly, articulately, and confidently. The ability to do this is essential for any physician who on a daily basis must communicate effectively with colleagues, patients, and families. Certainly the content of one's answers is important when evaluating a person's knowledge about a specific topic, but in a setting such as a medical school interview, it is often the method of delivery that becomes more important that the message that is delivered. Having said this, I think the content of your answer can definitely help you and can also hurt you. I guess what I'm trying to say is that despite what seem like some simple, easy going, non-intellectually demanding questions, the delivery of your answers really does show a lot.

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Guest strider2004

Wow, some people sound bitter! Now instead of ridiculing the process, THINK about why they would ask you such questions. Why would an interviewer want to know what kitchen appliance you'd be?

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Guest BCgirl

Strider,

 

I don't think anybody sounded like they were ridiculing the interview process at Queen's. They were just asking about some seemingly odd questions...

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Guest thelaze

I agree, I think the general sentiment is a bit of confusion over what seem like arbitrary questions. If there's no format that the interviewers stick to, and interviewees have different experiences depending on who they're interviewed by, then what I'm interested in is how do they interpret and score the results of these very different interviews?

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Guest RAK2005

While I can't speak to all of the comments (for obvious reasons), there is a standardized way of making each interview team equivalent through a statistical manipulation (I can't even begin to explain Z-scores to myself, let alone anyone else!). Thus, don't be discouraged if your interview seemed a little different then everyone else's. Who knows how the rest of your interview team scored the 5 other applicants that day !

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Guest strider2004

Heh, I guess 'ridicule' is a strong word. Sorry for jumping all over you guys.

Let me assure you that although these questions sound quite random, they do serve a purpose. The general goal for all interviewers is to get a good understanding of:

1) whether or not medicine would be right for them

2) whether or not they are better qualified than the next person in admittance to the next class

 

Each team is supposed to have a standardized approach to that. Now there are many ways to get from point A to point B so not everybody's interview will be the same. However, there should be consistency within that team.

 

Now again, if you don't understand how a certain question could be relevant, think more laterally. How did you answer that question? What would be a bad answer for that question? Is this a question geared towards putting you above other applicants or more towards screening out the negative answers? Geez I sound cryptic.

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Yep, that _does_ sound cryptic - maybe it'll make more sense next year...

 

Just goes to show, no matter if you're looking at it from inside or outside, med admissions is always a bit of a black box. =)

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personally i think questions like, if you were a fruit what would you be or the kitchen appliance one are quite odd and don't add much to the interview. i think they are added to decrease stress, have some fun or something along those lines. personally, i wouldn't and never have asked these questions.

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Guest Koggetsu

I think the important thing when answering those questions is not "what" but "why". U must saying something to support the answer u just gave.

Am i right strider2004?

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Guest peachy

lol jeff! do you really think that crazy questions DECREASE stress? I luckily didn't get any of thsoe in my queen's interview, but they definitely would have stressed me out even more. :)

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Guest strider2004

Alright alright. I'll give you an example. I went to UWO for my undergrad. The nominated student council presidents would come to the different residences and give their speeches plus a q&a. I'd always try to finish off with this kind of question "do you consider yourselves to be intelligent or not? Either way, how would you use your intelligence or lack of to help us students? Or...do you consider yourselves to be moral or not, etc etc."

 

Each time, one contestant gave this answer "Well obviously to be here we would have to have some sort of intelligence. I don't see how that question is relevant<end of answer>" or "We are obviously moral and are trying to help the students. I have nothing more to add<end of answer>"

 

The answer I liked was along the lines of "well you have to different between being knowledgeable and smart. I have enough credits for a physics degree and could walk into the physics office right now and pick it up. However, that's not why I consider myself to be intelligent. I grew up in a neighbourhood where everybody was doing pot and coke and I was able to stay away from drugs. That's what I consider to be intelligence."

 

Good answer!

 

I was trying to have some fun and some people didn't play along like everybody else. I didn't vote for them.

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