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VR - Examkrackers or Kaplan or Princeton?


sdkram

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Hi there,

 

I was reading the reviews and suggestions you guys made about which review program to take in general when some questions rose up in my mind. I took the evil test last year and, to my disgust, I had failed my verbal...getting a mark of 7 :mad: Now, previously I studied Kaplan and I didn't think their (mapping) strategies for verbal helped me that much. One of you informed me from your posts that EXAMKRACKERS has a different strategy from both Kaplan and Princeton, does Princeton's VR methods differ from Kaplan as well? Basically, when I used Kaplan my scores never improved (stayed b/w 7 and 8), now I wonder is it just me not getting it or does anyone think that Kaplan's strategies were not so useful? Which one in your opinion is the best method for studying the VR? Or what are their general strengths and weaknesses if it really depends on the person? Thanks a bunch guys.

 

-Mark

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Honestly...EKs strategy to me just reflects reading the passage and trying your best to understand it. MCAT VR questions are patterned...finding that pattern is hard and most people don't (including myself). You may ask how do I then know there is a pattern...because they have a certain number of types of questions and they just get repeated over and over.

 

Anyways, a friend suggested a technique to me that helped improve her score. It helped me get from 9 to around 10/11 as well in EK/AAMC tests. She suggested going through an entire EK101 test without actually reading the passages - just do the questions and try to answer all the questions based on the way the questions are asked, the answers available, and the other questions. This is to help give you an idea of what a "good" or "bad" VR answer is. Generally "bad" answers are too extreme or just don't answer the question even if it is a true statement. After you do this, go back to taking tests with reading the passages and using some of the tricks you picked up from tackling questions. See what happens. My improvement was almost instant...I got pretty good at eliminating the two ridiculous answers that pretty much present in every single question.

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My improvement was almost instant...I got pretty good at eliminating the two ridiculous answers that pretty much present in every single question.

I personally find eliminating the 2 ridiculous answers to be pretty easy, it's the picking between the other 2 that are nearly equal that's hard...all of my mistakes end up being explained as "this answer is technically correct, but it's not the BEST..." talk about frustrating.:rolleyes:

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ya...those are good too. However, it is still good to do as many different types as you can get your hands on. So, that means practicing your stamina maybe with Kaplan and your reading speed (if that can be improved) with Princeton or vice versa...whatever works.

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Thanx for the prompt feedback! I just read most of the SDN forum as well regarding topics about the VR strategies. I found out that for EK people either really recommend it or say that it's a complete scam, while almost nobody recommended the Kaplan strategies, but for TPR nobody really said anything much about it, aside from the fact that TPR resembles AAMC tests the most.

 

For EK, that leads me to another question, if you have previously taken time to eliminate your ans before reading the texts, would there be adequate time? For me everytime I do verbal it leaves me with virtually no time at all to review.

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For EK, that leads me to another question, if you have previously taken time to eliminate your ans before reading the texts, would there be adequate time? For me everytime I do verbal it leaves me with virtually no time at all to review.

 

 

I think Kuantum was suggesting that exercise simply as a means to help you recognize false answers. Then you could go back to readnig passage... then answering, and you'd see eliminating wrong answers to be easier.

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I think Kuantum was suggesting that exercise simply as a means to help you recognize false answers. Then you could go back to readnig passage... then answering, and you'd see eliminating wrong answers to be easier.

 

Ya...it is just an exercise to help you improve your ability to recognize bad answers. If anything, it will help you cut down on time, but use any extra time to better analyze the questions - after all, you don't get marks for reading the passage, just picking the right answer.

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I am now practicing for verbal and I am using Princeton review, Kaplan and EK material and I find that EK is insanely hard. Is it representative of the actual MCAT? I am usually good at Verbal, ie I got a 10 on my diagnostic Kaplan test.

I scored same on EK and the AAMC practice verbal tests...I didn't notice a dramatic difference in difficulty. I didn't think Kaplan was that different either, to be honest.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is somewhere in the MCAT thread. AAMC says the time has been reduced by 30% but the number of questions has been reduced by 33%. However, it still works out that you have less time per passage.

 

The post I put up showing the numbers: http://www.premed101.com/forums/showpost.php?p=156727&postcount=26

 

The entire thread: http://www.premed101.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19146&highlight=verbal+CBT+less+time

 

The link where it mentions the 30%/33% thing: http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/cbt.htm

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