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First year, a total disaster, please advice


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Really, it's always the same deal....analyze why you did so badly. Poor time management? Skipping class too much? Confused with the material, but didn't take advantage of the tutors/TAs or groupwork? Didn't submit assignments on time and lost a few points for nothing?

 

Then after you figure out the problem, try and find a way to fix it to guarantee an improvement in your performance for the years to come.

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thanks a lot man

Like your advice, I don't know, maybe its habitual for people to skip classes in first year:p, but yea that could be one of the reasons for my shocking performance.

Also, I have heard people discouraging med school aspirants who do not perform really well in the first year, saying it's not their cup of tea.

How true is it, that people who get f****d in their first yr stand no chance for med school?

 

thanks again

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thanks a lot man

Like your advice, I don't know, maybe its habitual for people to skip classes in first year:p, but yea that could be one of the reasons for my shocking performance.

Also, I have heard people discouraging med school aspirants who do not perform really well in the first year, saying it's not their cup of tea.

How true is it, that people who get f****d in their first yr stand no chance for med school?

 

thanks again

 

not true at all...you may not be one of those who are competitive enough to get in after 3rd year of undergrad, but so what? if you do well from now on, you have as good a chance as anyone...failure (and I'm not saying that's what yours is) in first year shouldn't discourage anyone...just as doing well in first year shouldn't make you over-confident...it's a long road ahead with many opportunities for improvement if you're willing to work for it...your focus now should be how to prevent this experience from repeating itself in the future. good luck.:)

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not true at all...you may not be one of those who are competitive enough to get in after 3rd year of undergrad, but so what? if you do well from now on, you have as good a chance as anyone...failure (and I'm not saying that's what yours is) in first year shouldn't discourage anyone...just as doing well in first year shouldn't make you over-confident...it's a long road ahead with many opportunities for improvement if you're willing to work for it...your focus now should be how to prevent this experience from repeating itself in the future. good luck.:)

 

what a motivational speaker avenir is... LoveBigHeart.jpg

 

*the saga continues*

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not true at all...you may not be one of those who are competitive enough to get in after 3rd year of undergrad, but so what? if you do well from now on, you have as good a chance as anyone...failure (and I'm not saying that's what yours is) in first year shouldn't discourage anyone...just as doing well in first year shouldn't make you over-confident...it's a long road ahead with many opportunities for improvement if you're willing to work for it...your focus now should be how to prevent this experience from repeating itself in the future. good luck.:)

 

hey

thanks for the motivation

But the only thing bugging me is that I really wanna go in for UofT's med school(thinking that I still have chance for Queen or Western, cuz they look at your best 2 years, hopefully) and the gpa I got in first year(2.7..wtf) will certainly hinder my possibilities of getting into UofT.

 

That's the reason I am getting really frustrated.

 

Can someone still advice me on this?

 

thanks

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hey

thanks for the motivation

But the only thing bugging me is that I really wanna go in for UofT's med school(thinking that I still have chance for Queen or Western, cuz they look at your best 2 years, hopefully) and the gpa I got in first year(2.7..wtf) will certainly hinder my possibilities of getting into UofT.

 

That's the reason I am getting really frustrated.

 

Can someone still advice me on this?

 

thanks

 

Were you full-time this year? (10 courses) If so, keep going full time for the remaining 3 years and you will qualify for U of T's weighting formula. That will let you drop all the bad marks you got this year and thus make you competitive (granted, of course, that your subsequent 3 years will all be 3.7 or above, because there are only so many courses you can drop with the weighting formula.

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Were you full-time this year? (10 courses) If so, keep going full time for the remaining 3 years and you will qualify for U of T's weighting formula. That will let you drop all the bad marks you got this year and thus make you competitive (granted, of course, that your subsequent 3 years will all be 3.7 or above, because there are only so many courses you can drop with the weighting formula.

 

yea, I took 10 courses this year, but I am repeating one in summer(if.. that matters).

Jus wanna ask how many courses does UofT drop in all, like I go to Mac, so how will they drop my courses...just curious..LOL

 

thanks, I appreciate your advice

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If you have studied over 3+ years full-time (ie. 3rd years don't apply), then you get to take off the lowest full-year grade for each year you've been in school. For example, I'm currently in fourth-year and have finished 3 years of full-time classes. I can take off 3 full-year (or 6 half-year) courses in my GPA weighting calculation. This can be courses from any year (eg. they could all be from first-year).

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Hi

 

I am in the first year and my grades are a total mess:o , and I hope to get into med school in the years to come.

Please give me any advice, how to deal with this situation, its killing me cuz I know getting a gpa of 2.7 won't lead my anywhere.

 

thanks

 

Find a mentor or a very successful student in your uni and try doing what they do ;)

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I also saw many, many people (mostly in residence) mess up their first year of university by skipping classes, partying too much, not realizing that the information comes really fast and that you're expected to learn a lot in a short period of time (relative to high school). Many do shape up after their first year. But not that many go from a 2.0 GPA to a 3.9 GPA, so I would be lying to you if I said it was easy. You really need to access your year and figure out what you need to change - whether it's skipping classes or partying too much or it's poor study habits (or most likely a combination of all of the above).

 

As for getting into UofT specifically...I would worry about getting your marks up first, knowing that you have a chance at various med schools still. And then worry about the specific schools a little bit later when you're closer to applying.

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Thanks a lot everyone for the advice and motivation, making me feel...it ain

t too late ...I CAN DO IT!!!:D

 

I m planning to major in Bio(core) next year.

Does anyone think that life science is a better option, cuz majority of the ppl at my school(med school aspirants) are taking that

 

thanks

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Thanks a lot everyone for the advice and motivation, making me feel...it ain

t too late ...I CAN DO IT!!!:D

 

I m planning to major in Bio(core) next year.

Does anyone think that life science is a better option, cuz majority of the ppl at my school(med school aspirants) are taking that

 

thanks

 

Hey, I would take the major that fits well with you (ie. you're interested in it and you're good at it and maybe what you would make the most sense from the point of view of a backup plan should you not get into med) rather than what everyone else is taking. It doesn't really make sense to follow the crowd if it doesn't work for you. In general, med schools don't discriminate what your undergrad program is. It's more important that you do well in whatever program you do choose.

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Hey, I would take the major that fits well with you (ie. you're interested in it and you're good at it and maybe what you would make the most sense from the point of view of a backup plan should you not get into med) rather than what everyone else is taking. It doesn't really make sense to follow the crowd if it doesn't work for you. In general, med schools don't discriminate what your undergrad program is. It's more important that you do well in whatever program you do choose.

 

Well, its kinda weird. I adore bio, but I m performing really bad in it, and I still wanna take it cuz i really love it and is also helpful for MCAT.

Hearsay- Not a lot of opportunities for students taking Bio(core) as an undergrad. True?

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Hey, I would take the major that fits well with you (ie. you're interested in it and you're good at it and maybe what you would make the most sense from the point of view of a backup plan should you not get into med) rather than what everyone else is taking. It doesn't really make sense to follow the crowd if it doesn't work for you. In general, med schools don't discriminate what your undergrad program is. It's more important that you do well in whatever program you do choose.

 

Yeah, I'd also suggest exploring the post-grad opportunities your major will offer to you, in case you don't get in. If you are equally good at Business and Medieval Studies, Business would obviously be a wiser choice, as you'd be more likely to land a decent-paying job right after graduation.

 

In my April 12th MCAT writer group, 5 out of 6 people were non-trads - already out of school. So the possibility of not getting in right away is quite real, and you need to have at least some sort of general idea of how you might be spending that time - choosing a major that provides you with a back-up plan is one way.

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@AJ

 

like what many people have said, do whatever you like so you can be happy about getting out of bed every morning. if you want to go medicine or bust....

 

you said you really want to go to UofT Med....but if you go to Mac, maybe it would be possible for you to switch into their Health Sci program. that way, youd be at least be pretty much guaranteed a spot for their med school. i dont know how switching into HSci works for Mac, since i dont go there but i know it is possible (i think its a B+ requirement to switch). so you may want to look into it.

 

oh, and the reason i said pretty much guranteed to get into Mac med is because over 70% of the BHSci grads get into med, and the way i look at it, thats unsual, and numbers dont lie. (http://www.fhs.mcmaster.ca/bhsc/postgrad/graduates.htm)

 

people will argue that having a 93% average means youre real smart and deserving to go into a program where youre killing time before going to med school. but seriously, by the time you get to fourth year, the average student of every science program is comparable in terms of aptitude or "smarts".

 

so AJ, look into BHSci if possible. good luck!

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@AJ

 

like what many people have said, do whatever you like so you can be happy about getting out of bed every morning. if you want to go medicine or bust....

 

you said you really want to go to UofT Med....but if you go to Mac, maybe it would be possible for you to switch into their Health Sci program. that way, youd be at least be pretty much guaranteed a spot for their med school. i dont know how switching into HSci works for Mac, since i dont go there but i know it is possible (i think its a B+ requirement to switch). so you may want to look into it.

 

oh, and the reason i said pretty much guranteed to get into Mac med is because over 70% of the BHSci grads get into med, and the way i look at it, thats unsual, and numbers dont lie. (http://www.fhs.mcmaster.ca/bhsc/postgrad/graduates.htm)

 

people will argue that having a 93% average means youre real smart and deserving to go into a program where youre killing time before going to med school. but seriously, by the time you get to fourth year, the average student of every science program is comparable in terms of aptitude or "smarts".

 

so AJ, look into BHSci if possible. good luck!

 

yea bane, thanks a lot for the suggestion

 

But I am screwed, my gpa in first year is barely touching 3.0:o

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you said you really want to go to UofT Med....but if you go to Mac, maybe it would be possible for you to switch into their Health Sci program. that way, youd be at least be pretty much guaranteed a spot for their med school. i dont know how switching into HSci works for Mac, since i dont go there but i know it is possible (i think its a B+ requirement to switch). so you may want to look into it.

 

oh, and the reason i said pretty much guranteed to get into Mac med is because over 70% of the BHSci grads get into med, and the way i look at it, thats unsual, and numbers dont lie. (http://www.fhs.mcmaster.ca/bhsc/postgrad/graduates.htm)

 

people will argue that having a 93% average means youre real smart and deserving to go into a program where youre killing time before going to med school. but seriously, by the time you get to fourth year, the average student of every science program is comparable in terms of aptitude or "smarts".

 

The numbers don't lie, but you're spinning them around. The people that get into BHSci are hard-working and really motivated to begin with; it's likely that if those same people had chosen to major in something else, they still would have made it to med school. It's been discussed ad nauseam that your major doesn't matter.

 

Also, I'm confused as to what you're trying to say in that last paragraph. Do you seriously believe that Health Sci kids are just ****ing around during their undergrad? They have to go through the same crap that everyone goes through.

 

Anyways, back on topic. To the OP, you need to figure out what you're doing wrong and fix it for the upcoming years. Usually these "disasters" are due to a lack of work ethic. It sounds like you're motivated at least, so you should be able to fix things up.

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The main reason people from certain programs are more likely to make med are two-fold: (1) the people in those programs are more likely to want to go into medicine, and (2) the people who enter those programs are harder worker or "smarter" to beginning with.

 

If you look at the numbers, the people in health sciences or life sciences programs are much much more likely to get into medicine than say students in engineering physics. It's not because students in engineering physics are dumb or incapable of getting into med - it's because they don't want to.

 

If you do well in your program, then it doesn't matter what program you take (provided you have the pre-req's, of course).

 

It's interesting that you enjoy biology but aren't doing well in it. Usually people do well in what they're interested in. Maybe you should think about why that's the case. Also, ask yourself would you do any better in a life sciences program?

 

As for post-grad options...typically, there aren't that many things you can do with just a biology BSc, although it's up to you to be creative with selling your degree. But there aren't that many things you can do with just a BSc in biochemistry or health sciences either. Most jobs now require some kind of grad work (eg. Masters) or some technical training.

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Hello!

 

I haven't read through the thread yet and I'm sure someone has already said this but incase they haven't here it goes.

 

Most schools don't look at all your years of undergrad when they calculate your GPA. The only school that does use them all (that I know of for sure) is MAC. Just learn try to figure out how to improve your marks for the upcoming years (I am speaking from experience).

 

Good luck!

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thanks a lot man

Like your advice, I don't know, maybe its habitual for people to skip classes in first year:p, but yea that could be one of the reasons for my shocking performance.

Also, I have heard people discouraging med school aspirants who do not perform really well in the first year, saying it's not their cup of tea.

How true is it, that people who get f****d in their first yr stand no chance for med school?

 

thanks again

 

While, in most regards I do believe that saying one that has a single bad year cannot go on to medschool later is bs. But it does raise a heck a lot of eyebrows in my opinion. That said, you can surely come back from this. You only have one year under your belt, you still have 2 years of catch up time. There are a few serious negatives though, namely you probably cut yourself out of Queens and UofT, I don't see how you can reasonably bring your 2.7 up to a 3.7+ by the end of your third year. That said, do well in your next two years and you have a shot at mac, western and OttawaU if you do extremely well.

 

Don't forget that there is always the states, australia, ireland etc if you find yourself a bit short.

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There are a few serious negatives though, namely you probably cut yourself out of Queens and UofT, I don't see how you can reasonably bring your 2.7 up to a 3.7+ by the end of your third year. That said, do well in your next two years and you have a shot at mac, western and OttawaU if you do extremely well.

 

Isn't Queens still a possibility with their "GPA for the most recent 2 Years" option? Or is it just generally super difficult to get into Queens? I'm in a similar situation as the OP, except I've blundered 2nd year as well. I'm hoping to really pick it up next year though, and Queens was giving me some hope.

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Isn't Queens still a possibility with their "GPA for the most recent 2 Years" option? Or is it just generally super difficult to get into Queens? I'm in a similar situation as the OP, except I've blundered 2nd year as well. I'm hoping to really pick it up next year though, and Queens was giving me some hope.

 

 

OP wants to go to UofT.

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Sorry, I perhaps worded that incorrectly. I was just wondering why Queens would no longer be an option.

 

No the OP was wrong, Queens would still be an option, if he manages to have either:

1) Cumulative GPA of 3.68

or 2) GPA for the most recent 2 Years = 3.78

 

* and of course the MCAT...

 

Same holds true for U of T... if they can bring the average up and keeps a full course load, few (6 i believe 1/2 year courses) are dropped.

 

so still hope ... dont give up

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