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This 3yr Myth (that medical schools ignore your first year of undergrad?)


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What is this myth that medical schools only look at your last 3 years in undergrad? Ignoring your freshman year as an adaptation period? From all I can gather, its a rather popular idea, but seems false?

 

It depends on the school and how they calculate gpa, for example at u of m you can drop a certain amount of classes, but at queens if u dont go over their minimum using all three years they set a higher minimum and look at your last 2 years

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It depends on the school and how they calculate gpa, for example at u of m you can drop a certain amount of classes, but at queens if u dont go over their minimum using all three years they set a higher minimum and look at your last 2 years

 

I did very badly first year. I had 8 total credits, and I did HORRIBLE. Very horrible. I had two W's, but they didn't count since I dropped the course so early that they never went on my transcript. I want to know, if I work hard all of the next 3 years and have barely passed all my courses this year (by mere percentages, really), is that a realistic goal? Assuming I can turn it around, that is.

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I did very badly first year. I had 8 total credits, and I did HORRIBLE. Very horrible. I had two W's, but they didn't count since I dropped the course so early that they never went on my transcript. I want to know, if I work hard all of the next 3 years and have barely passed all my courses this year (by mere percentages, really), is that a realistic goal? Assuming I can turn it around, that is.

 

Yes, if you turn things around, it's not too late because most schools have their own unique way of evaluating you academically...

eg Queens: last 2 yrs

Western: best 2 yrs

Ottawa: last 3 yrs

and so on.

oh and also keep in mind most schools require 5 full-courses/yr in the years they use to calculate your gpa.

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Yes, if you turn things around, it's not too late because most schools have their own unique way of evaluating you academically...

eg Queens: last 2 yrs

Western: best 2 yrs

Ottawa: last 3 yrs

and so on.

oh and also keep in mind most schools require 5 full-courses/yr in the years they use to calculate your gpa.

 

OMG. Thank You very much. I really thought I was done as a premed. I REALLY appreciate it!

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Yes, if you turn things around, it's not too late because most schools have their own unique way of evaluating you academically...

eg Queens: last 2 yrs

Western: best 2 yrs

Ottawa: last 3 yrs

and so on.

oh and also keep in mind most schools require 5 full-courses/yr in the years they use to calculate your gpa.

 

This year, my freshman year, I have 4 full courses this year. Does that mean they won't use this year to calculate my GPA?

 

Thanks.

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This year, my freshman year, I have 4 full courses this year. Does that mean they won't use this year to calculate my GPA?

 

Thanks.

 

every school is different. you'll hear this 100x over again.

 

i can tell you with certainty you won't be eligible for uoft's weighting formula (dropping the 3 lowest courses).

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the only school that requires a full course load is western; the year didn't happen to them if it didn't have 5 credits or the equivalent thereof.

 

queens will consider any year in which you were registered as a full time student (ie in the case of UofT 3.5 credits or more)

 

I believe all the other schools don't officially care... (UofT doesn't give you the weighting formula as was already mentioned)

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This year, my freshman year, I have 4 full courses this year. Does that mean they won't use this year to calculate my GPA?

 

Thanks.

 

Only 4 courses and still doing poorly :eek: time to give your head a shake, get your ass in gear, put your nose to the grindstone, hit the books, stop drinking your face off, and a bunch of other appropriate cliches.

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the only school that requires a full course load is western; the year didn't happen to them if it didn't have 5 credits or the equivalent thereof.

 

queens will consider any year in which you were registered as a full time student (ie in the case of UofT 3.5 credits or more)

 

I believe all the other schools don't officially care... (UofT doesn't give you the weighting formula as was already mentioned)

 

Calgary requires that you have at least 1 year with full courseload (to show that you can handle it).

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Quick thing about Ottawa - yes they look at last 3 years.

 

If you are applying in your 4th year (for admission right after undergrad) your last 3 years are your 3rd, 2nd AND 1st years because those are the "3 year" marks available on your transcript. If you don't want Ottawa to count your first year marks, you must apply the summer/fall AFTER you get your undergrad degree becase then your 4th yr marks will be available (so your 4th, 3rd, and 2nd will be looked at) - in which case you'd better find something to do for a year.

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Quick thing about Ottawa - yes they look at last 3 years.

 

If you are applying in your 4th year (for admission right after undergrad) your last 3 years are your 3rd, 2nd AND 1st years because those are the "3 year" marks available on your transcript. If you don't want Ottawa to count your first year marks, you must apply the summer/fall AFTER you get your undergrad degree becase then your 4th yr marks will be available (so your 4th, 3rd, and 2nd will be looked at) - in which case you'd better find something to do for a year.

 

What if I take more than 4 years to complete a 4 year degree? Will Medical Schools look down at that?

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I thought all of your years had to be full-time (e.g. 5.0 courses) for med school? Can't remember where I read that though, maybe it's not right. Does anyone know for sure?

 

No that's not true.

Some schools will not count a year if it's less than a full course load, but some don't mind.

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Quick thing about Ottawa - yes they look at last 3 years.

 

If you are applying in your 4th year (for admission right after undergrad) your last 3 years are your 3rd, 2nd AND 1st years because those are the "3 year" marks available on your transcript. If you don't want Ottawa to count your first year marks, you must apply the summer/fall AFTER you get your undergrad degree becase then your 4th yr marks will be available (so your 4th, 3rd, and 2nd will be looked at) - in which case you'd better find something to do for a year.

 

I assume this is true for Western's best two years option as well? So if you're applying your 4th year, you must have had a 3.7 in both your 3rd and 2nd year to be considered for an interview?

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I assume this is true for Western's best two years option as well? So if you're applying your 4th year, you must have had a 3.7 in both your 3rd and 2nd year to be considered for an interview?

 

Western is BEST TWO years: you must have at least 3.7 in any combination of two out of three years of undergrad...1st/3rd, 2nd/3rd, 1st/2nd, etc. So if your first year is crappy, your 2nd and 3rd should be over 3.7.

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I assume this is true for Western's best two years option as well? So if you're applying your 4th year, you must have had a 3.7 in both your 3rd and 2nd year to be considered for an interview?

 

Western grants interviews based on your ONE best year being over their cut-off (and meeting the MCAT cut-offs as well). Offers are conditional upon having TWO years over their cut-offs. That means that if you apply in your 4th year, you only need to have had one year above 3.7 (or whatever the cut-off is for that year), provided that you obtain the cut-off during your last year. Both years must be full time (5.0 courses, excluding any repeated courses).

 

Elaine

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What if I take more than 4 years to complete a 4 year degree? Will Medical Schools look down at that?

 

Many people complete their degree in 5 years, usually to take prerequisite courses or to boost their GPA. I think this is an acceptable route to take if you need to improve your marks. But again remember that these need to be full course years (so you can't just take it easy in undergrad for a longer period of time).

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