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Differences between medical schools


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I know at this stage, our biggest concern is GETTING IN TO MEDICAL SCHOOL. But does anyone know more about the different medical school programs and the pros and cons of going to each one??

 

One thing I noticed is that McMaster and Calgary both offer 3 year programs, so we'll be able to get onto the rest of our lives sooner.

 

And apparently McMaster is one of the most popular med programs in the country. any idea why?

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I know at this stage, our biggest concern is GETTING IN TO MEDICAL SCHOOL. But does anyone know more about the different medical school programs and the pros and cons of going to each one??

 

One thing I noticed is that McMaster and Calgary both offer 3 year programs, so we'll be able to get onto the rest of our lives sooner.

 

And apparently McMaster is one of the most popular med programs in the country. any idea why?

 

You need to browse through each school's forums and do some research. Go to each medical school's website and look through their curriculum.

 

1. Yes, you can get on with your life sooner with McMaster and Calgary if time is an issue.

 

2. McMaster does not require the MCAT, nor has any requirements.

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I know some stuff about a few med schools, mainly the ones i had interviews at. yes mcmaster is only 3 years but u dont have a summer and you do ur electives in the summers so you may have to do an elective in an area u may be intersted in before learning anything about it. as well mac is mainly problem based learning wiht only 2 lectures a week.

i also belive that there arent really exams at mcmaster

queens is a good school but you dont start clerkship till the middle of your third year whih is a lot later than another 4 year programs, meaning you wont have had as much experience before you make ur decisions for the match as u would at one of the other schools

and u of m has a 4 year program with 2 years clerckship and 2 years clerckship. as well the program is a mixture of lectures, PBL , tutorials, work with cadavors ( you acutally get to cut them at u of m which you dont do at mcmaster), and other stuff as well.

just htought id give you some of the info i know!

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Hey! Thanks so much for your thorough analysis of U of A. And the clerkship does seem quite frightening. I've heard many negative things about the experience. I don't get it. Sleep deprivation and ill treatment from others amongst the health care team. Is it part of the training on stress tolerance?? I'm thinking about applying to U of C, McMaster and UBC, hopefully the residency experience there would be better.

Do you know anything about U of C??

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I think there's a considerable overlap in the qualified students that apply to several schools. So many students do get to choose, although most of us would be happy to get into any school in Canada :) You can see that this is the case by the fairly significant movement in the waitlist of the schools. This is particularly true of the Ontario schools because almost all the Ontario students apply to more than one Ontario schools. Students with a good GPA, MCAT, EC's, and interview skills will likely get into more than one school. Similar situation with Alberta where students may get into both UofC and UofA. My impression is that the waitlist tends to move a little bit less in the other schools (eg. Saskatchewan, UBC, etc.) where there is only one in-province school and generally students will accept the offer.

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After interviewing at a few different schools, I would say that the students at almost every school have pretty positive things to say about their experiences. My impression is that their isn't really a "best" school within Canada per say. The most important thing is really which school is the best fit for you as an individual. This might mean: location (eg. close to home), learning style (eg. PBL vs. traditional), particular career interests (eg. research, rural medicine), learning environment (eg. small classes), or non-medical personal factors (eg. family, spouse).

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